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Cornwall IV question


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I’ve had my Cornwall IVs for some time now.  I like them a lot, they are outstanding with some types of music (classic rock, jazz, large scale classical music etc.).
 

One thing that’s disturbing me is the noise my AV receiver is introducing as soon as a source is active, that’s hopefully fixed by replacing the Marantz with another solution. The receiver is only used as a HDMI switch and pre-amp for digital sources, feeding a power amp via a pre-amp in HT pass through. 
 

Now, what’s really bothering me is the sibilant pitch I hear on a few recordings (mainly piano and female vocals, Norah Jones live cover of Black Hole Sun is one example). This is regardless of source/amp, it’s there on vinyl when the receiver is out of the loop and it’s there when using Spotify on the Apple TV. I can hear this also when watching movies, during some dialogue parts or when high frequency sounds are present. Has anyone else noticed this and what can I do to resolve the problem? Would a decent tube amp solve the problem, or perhaps a class A solid state amp? In addition to the Marantz receiver, I’m still using Mark Levinson 326S as pre and a No 432 power amp. 

 

I should say that when using headphones on another setup (or speakers) I can hear the same pitch but it’s not as evident or annoying  as it is over the Cornwall IVs.
 

 

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39 minutes ago, John Ek said:

Has anyone else noticed this and what can I do to resolve the problem?

Try this: https://community.klipsch.com/index.php?/topic/155096-the-missing-octaves-audacity-remastering-to-restore-tracks/

 

The sibilence is likely in the recording, perhaps emphasized by the SPL response of the Cornwall IVs in-room.  In the case of the Nora Jones Black Hole Sun recording (live at Detroit), it's around 2-3 kHz, which is lower frequency sibilance (it's usually at higher frequency--around 5-7 kHz).  You can see it in the recording itself.

 

42 minutes ago, John Ek said:

Would a decent tube amp solve the problem, or perhaps a class A solid state amp?

You can better employ "room correction software" (i.e., flatten the in-room SPL and phase response).

 

I don't recommend using amplifiers with high output impedance (i.e., SETs without global feedback) unless you re-EQ your loudspeakers to flat response.

 

Chris

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I have the Cornwall IV with about 150 hours on them.  Haven’t noticed any sibilance.  Just gave that Norah Jones track a listen and I’m hearing absolutely stunning vocals with a great 3D presence and very delicate mic pick up of her breath and vocal imperfections.  

 

Listened via Apple Music 24/96 via a Cambridge Audio CXN to PrimaLuna Dialogue HP integrated.  

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Brought back my Genelec 8050’s just to see if they are different. Not so, they were just as bad, actually even worse. I guess the problem is in my ears. Never experienced this before. Pretty sure it’s the sound pressure levels at live hockey games that’s caused some damage. 
 

 

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I'm going to give this song a listen when I get home, the track is on Tidal? I'm curious because my room is imperfect and I'm also using a cheaper A/V receiver to power my CWIVs. 

 

Is there a specific point in the track here you hear this anomaly? 

Now that I've read your last reply I see that you've come to the conclusion that it's your ears...I'll still give it a listen when I get home though. 

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21 minutes ago, CoryGillmore said:

I'm going to give this song a listen when I get home, the track is on Tidal? I'm curious because my room is imperfect and I'm also using a cheaper A/V receiver to power my CWIVs. 

 

Is there a specific point in the track here you hear this anomaly? 

Now that I've read your last reply I see that you've come to the conclusion that it's your ears...I'll still give it a listen when I get home though. 

As soon as the piano starts playing. It’s not really sibilance, some frequencies seem to cause a ringing in my ears (fairly one-note).

 

Not sure what to make of it but if I cup my hands behind the ears, the problem is less pronounced. I guess that by doing so I might alter the frequency balance and also probably  get rid of some reflections off the back wall? 

 

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