Jump to content

Ripping CDs


Recommended Posts

After several years of false starts and kicks down the road, Ive decided to rip my entire CD collection. Is there a recommended external CD ripper? The drive in my computer would take years to get the job done.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I converted hundred's of CD's with dBpoweramp. I can't imagine anything else that could be as painless and accurate. You might want to purchase an external USB optical drive if the one in your computer is pretty old.

 

God bless you and your precious family - Langston

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, YK Thom said:

Are the actual physical external CD burners similar in quality?

 

Online reviews tend to all be "oh, this is great" about everything, so I went with a Blu-Ray drive from a trustworthy company (Samsung, model SE-506) and it worked very well - also useful for movies once in a while. This was several years ago and it's still working perfectly, but I'm sure this model has been superseded.

 

Edit: just found this - OWC (the seller) is a long-time favorite of mine and this is what I'd buy for CD ripping if I were looking at a pile of 'em.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/21/2021 at 10:37 AM, YK Thom said:

Is there a recommended external CD ripper? The drive in my computer would take years to get the job done.

 

I've had very good luck ripping 1000s of CDs, DVDs and Blu-Rays with a Pioneer BDR-XD05S. I'm sure there is a replacement out by now if this is not the current, latest and greatest. It won't do HDR Blu-Rays, not many do. It rips CD very quickly.

 

https://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PUSA/Computer/Computer+Drives/BDR-XD05

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

YK Thom,

Ripping your CDs is step 1.

How are you planning on organizing your CD library?

Then, how are you going to play them ?

 

You are going down a rabbit hole here with a lot of options and pit falls. You need to plan ahead.

 

Like quite a few members here I went with the Squeezebox server and players, they have kept up and now support most of the streaming services as well as local libraries. A lot of options out there, good luck.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/26/2021 at 1:03 PM, rplace said:

 

I've had very good luck ripping 1000s of CDs, DVDs and Blu-Rays with a Pioneer BDR-XD05S. I'm sure there is a replacement out by now if this is not the current, latest and greatest. It won't do HDR Blu-Rays, not many do. It rips CD very quickly.

 

https://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PUSA/Computer/Computer+Drives/BDR-XD05

 

 

This is the sort of thing I need.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/26/2021 at 4:18 PM, Wirrunna said:

YK Thom,

Ripping your CDs is step 1.

How are you planning on organizing your CD library?

Then, how are you going to play them ?

 

You are going down a rabbit hole here with a lot of options and pit falls. You need to plan ahead.

 

Like quite a few members here I went with the Squeezebox server and players, they have kept up and now support most of the streaming services as well as local libraries. A lot of options out there, good luck.

Very good point. I am on the precipice. Once I have the hardware to rip efficiently being able to store and access will be the priority.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A newer computer with a good dvd drive. If your old computer is that slow maybe its time to replace

EAC to do the rip. Takes longer but worth it

JRiver Media Center to organize

A good NAS to backup and provide tunes to the house

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@YK Thom, ah ha, now we are at the crux of the matter... collecting and ripping is just the tip of the ice berg.

 

when I considered the whole job, I decided to buy a complete one piece solution... a Bluesound Vault 2. As a music server it manages all the ripping, storage, human interface, playback, Internet access for streaming, Bluetooth etc. I could have built a PC or Raspberry, managed the operating system, ripper, storage, human interface, playback, streaming software ... but I’m lazy and retired so a commercial product got me into my listening chair faster.  There are lots of choices you’ll have to consider in all the software and hardware categories and getting them to work together and remain compatible through various release points... my only real suggestion is to think about and research the whole job before going too far on any one step.  Once you have a solution it really is wonderful... although I still prefer my old TT and a good LP with a scotch!

 

EDIT: oh, I forgot to add the thorny issue of a DAC for playback... almost as deep a subject as choice of capacitor for a crossover update!

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been coaching some old timers on another music forum. Here is a copy and paste from a recent thread I posted in trying to help them out a bit. I've done this a lot. I would never use an all in one system for the ripping portion of it.

 

A bit late to the party but for those of you have not already jumped in the world of digitizing your collection(s) I'll throw out a few lessons learned. I've been doing this and re-doing it for about 15 years. The first few were very painful learning form experience by trial and error. Lots of good info online now as well.

 

Hard Drive (HDD) Space is cheap your time is worth something. Buy bigger than you think you need. Once you have 1TB or so and you max out a drive and need to copy it over it takes forever. I think right now 4TB USB 3.0 drives are the sweet spot. For about $100 give or take 20 you can get something that will fit most peoples needs. For an idea of space I keep all my music divided into two buckets. Standard Resolution 44.1Hz 16bit (CD quality) and High Resolution (anything higher than CD quality). My system which happens to be Roon reports that I have 2001 Artist, 7198 Albums and 93,944 tracks. When I look at how that is divided up my Standard drive has 69,892 files taking up only 1.98TB while my HighRez drive is just over 30,000 files but takes up 3.98TB. Also note that a 2TB drive when formatted won't give you 2TB of storage, so my 1.98TB of standard music won't fit on a 2TB dirve. I have a 4TB drive for standard music and 5TB drive for the HighRez stuff.

 

If you are just starting out ripping your CDs rip them to FLAC, onto a computer HDD, independent of some all in one box. Even if right now you want more portable files for your phone/tablet/traveling and think a 320 .MP3 will suffice there will come a day when you want lossless files for optimum fidelity. You won't want to re-rip all those MP3s to FLAC. It is very painful. There are lots of utilities that once you have FLAC files you convert to .MP3 (and other formats). FLAC works pretty much everywhere. Even if you are a 100% Mac person or 100% XYZ don't rip them to a priority format. Don't rip them into a system/box you buy to curate them. For example Roon sells a Nucleus that you can rip your CDs directly into their system. It does not put them into a very useful format (Artist/Album/File Name) should that crap out on you or should you want to move them somewhere else. Take the time to Rip them to FLAC, tag them properly and organize them in a way that makes sense to you. I'd suggest a folder structure like:
Artist
...Album
.....tracks 01 to NN

 

EAC - Exact Audio Copy is a great free utility for ripping CD. It is old and clunky but does a fantastic job of getting things bit perfect. It has a way to check against an online database of other rips of the same album to insure you got an accurate rip. There are plenty of others out there that do a good job too.

FlacSquisher will turn FLAC files into any size MP3 you want.

 

BACKUP everything. Since HDDs are so cheap you want to make sure your music that is on your home network is backed up, preferably off site. This can be as simple as getting a 2nd 4TB USB drive that has a copy of your music at home and leave it at a friends house, safety deposit box, work desk drawer, etc. If you lose your music after ripping it all you will be heartbroken.

 

There are tons of ways to get your newly ripped music to a player, computer, DAC, etc. One of the simplest. Is just to plug your USB drive into the USB port of your home Router/Switch...most these days have them. If not they are cheap. A networked USB drive will show up as storage and you can point your computer/player/streamer at it.

 

Quick summary:
Buy two 4TB USB drives
Rip all your CDs to FLAC
Copy all your music to both HDDs
Put one drive on your network
Put one drive at your friends house
Put all the CDs into storage and forget about them

 

It can be much, much more complex, fun, frustrating and time consuming if you want it to be. I've spent 10s of thousands of dollars on music and gear in 40+ years of being a hard core music lover. At 55 years old the best audio purchase I've ever made is Roon. That includes every speaker, every amp, every-every-thing. If you can snap together Legos you can make a simple networked Roon system. I've had and still have Sonos at my house, that is a very nice solution if you don't have a huge library of music. You are however somewhat locked into their equipment and ecosystem. Roon plays very nicely with Sonos, Chromecast, Airplay and a host of other endpoints.

 

If you are a movie lover and have tons of DVDs and Blu-Rays you can do almost the same things with a Shield from Nvidia as the hardware and PLEX as the software.

Hit me up if you have any questions.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm an old timer (70) and that seems a little too complicated and expensive for me.

I have a modest collection of only 550 albums so it's probably not a fair comparison but this method could be scaled up. I simply used dBpoweramp, ripped them all to flac, dumped them into a single directory on a 200gb SD card, stuck that card into a slot in my wireless router and was done with it. I point Volumio to that single directory and it sorts it all out.

The SD card was 25.00 and RT2600ac router was 200.00.

I'm a cheap and lazy bastard.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

so, I'm not familiar with dBpoweramp, but I have used Audacity, and have gotten acceptable results ripping from CD. but trying to "digitize" from vinyl is a whole diff story.

 

I've tried a number of times, trying to remember what I've tried before, make a tweak or 2, retry - but SQ really sucks.

it sounds like a really bad vinyl or cassette playback. SQ is really bad.

 

any suggestions from the group?

does dBpoweramp allow input via USB feed from turntable?

I looked thru what documentation I could find for a few min but did not see that called out anywhere.

thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...