Jump to content

LaScala for this room


Recommended Posts

BTW here comes one of my first posts at the Klipsch Forums, same speaker in the old appartement, a narrower postion as seen in one of. the photos. The benefit was that the room was longer and a bit higher. At that time I tried with an ALK universal network but now I am happily back to the original AA xover.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, KT88 said:

I had the Lascala in another apartment a little closer together because the room was a bit narrower, as in your photo. Both in the other apartment and now, where the speakers are a further apart, the sound was/is excellent.
I personally do not need a subwoofer. The natural and powerful sound reproduction does not need a sub. Of course, the bass is not very deep, but the Lascala never sound thin or if something would be missing. The tones of a double bass are extremely natural. Voices and the midrange are the absolute strength of the Lascala. The K400 connects seamlessly to the bass...all of a piece.
The low E string of the double bass is not quite reached but it does not harm the wonderful musical enjoyment. Perhaps the secret lies in the fact that although the horn mercilessly stops supporting at higher basses, you can still feel the low notes, albeit more quietly. It is not a brutal cut but a gentle creeping out of the bass because you can sense direct bass through the doghouse. The ear reacts sensitively to abrupt cut offs but it forgives very benevolently a steady drop in sound energy. I would also always leave my Lascala as they are, no calming by bracing the side walls, no sterilization. Wes Montgomery, Chet Baker and Vladimir Horowitz visit you at home. BTW of all things piano, the Lascala is the master of piano reproduction...and I know a great many speakers. I have a pretty good piano in the next room, piano music is via the Lascalas authentic especially in the left hand very real (in the right hand anyway).

 

This photo I took just now.

 

 

D1922AD4-9E8F-4DDF-B3AC-8E457B843469.jpeg


Nice setup.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, KT88 said:

I had the Lascala in another apartment a little closer together because the room was a bit narrower, as in your photo. Both in the other apartment and now, where the speakers are a further apart, the sound was/is excellent.
I personally do not need a subwoofer. The natural and powerful sound reproduction does not need a sub. Of course, the bass is not very deep, but the Lascala never sound thin or if something would be missing. The tones of a double bass are extremely natural. Voices and the midrange are the absolute strength of the Lascala. The K400 connects seamlessly to the bass...all of a piece.
The low E string of the double bass is not quite reached but it does not harm the wonderful musical enjoyment. Perhaps the secret lies in the fact that although the horn mercilessly stops supporting at higher basses, you can still feel the low notes, albeit more quietly. It is not a brutal cut but a gentle creeping out of the bass because you can sense direct bass through the doghouse. The ear reacts sensitively to abrupt cut offs but it forgives very benevolently a steady drop in sound energy. I would also always leave my Lascala as they are, no calming by bracing the side walls, no sterilization. Wes Montgomery, Chet Baker and Vladimir Horowitz visit you at home. BTW of all things piano, the Lascala is the master of piano reproduction...and I know a great many speakers. I have a pretty good piano in the next room, piano music is via the Lascalas authentic especially in the left hand very real (in the right hand anyway).

 

This photo I took just now.

 

 

D1922AD4-9E8F-4DDF-B3AC-8E457B843469.jpeg

Sweet!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, KT88 said:

I had the Lascala in another apartment a little closer together because the room was a bit narrower, as in your photo. Both in the other apartment and now, where the speakers are a further apart, the sound was/is excellent.
I personally do not need a subwoofer. The natural and powerful sound reproduction does not need a sub. Of course, the bass is not very deep, but the Lascala never sound thin or if something would be missing. The tones of a double bass are extremely natural. Voices and the midrange are the absolute strength of the Lascala. The K400 connects seamlessly to the bass...all of a piece.
The low E string of the double bass is not quite reached but it does not harm the wonderful musical enjoyment. Perhaps the secret lies in the fact that although the horn mercilessly stops supporting at higher basses, you can still feel the low notes, albeit more quietly. It is not a brutal cut but a gentle creeping out of the bass because you can sense direct bass through the doghouse. The ear reacts sensitively to abrupt cut offs but it forgives very benevolently a steady drop in sound energy. I would also always leave my Lascala as they are, no calming by bracing the side walls, no sterilization. Wes Montgomery, Chet Baker and Vladimir Horowitz visit you at home. BTW of all things piano, the Lascala is the master of piano reproduction...and I know a great many speakers. I have a pretty good piano in the next room, piano music is via the Lascalas authentic especially in the left hand very real (in the right hand anyway).

 

This photo I took just now.

 

 

D1922AD4-9E8F-4DDF-B3AC-8E457B843469.jpeg

Very well put and I agree completely!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/14/2022 at 8:53 AM, svberger said:

Will this space accommodate LaScala's and is it something I should do if the cost is reasonable?

 

 

You should buy reasonably priced La Scalas if you have the room.  Prices are steadily rising and they are a fun store of value for your spare cash. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, tigerwoodKhorns said:

You should buy reasonably priced La Scalas if you have the room.  Prices are steadily rising and they are a fun store of value for your spare cash. 

There's a local guy with a pair that he say's are nice, late 70's I think all original. I actually tried to trade him the Cornwalls and a restored(by Terry DeWick, no less) McIntosh MC2120 and he said it wasn't enough😅

 

I'm patient, because believe me when I say I'm not suffering with my present set up.

  • Like 2
  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, svberger said:

There's a local guy with a pair that he say's are nice, late 70's I think all original. I actually tried to trade him the Cornwalls and a restored(by Terry DeWick, no less) McIntosh MC2120 and he said it wasn't enough😅

 

I'm patient, because believe me when I say I'm not suffering with my present set up.

No need to change unless you find a really good deal.  The Cornwalls look like they were made for your room. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, svberger said:

There's a local guy with a pair that he say's are nice, late 70's I think all original. I actually tried to trade him the Cornwalls and a restored(by Terry DeWick, no less) McIntosh MC2120 and he said it wasn't enough😅

 

I'm patient, because believe me when I say I'm not suffering with my present set up.

 

If you’re really patient, keep on saving and look for a pair of La Scala IIs.  They have stronger bass, which makes it appear to go lower, although it actually doesn’t.  As well, their crossovers are much more modern and their cabinets are better looking.

 

At first, there were very few on the used market, but now more are appearing all the time, sometimes at quite good prices.  Eventually, their used prices will rise to close to what they originally cost, just like with the original La Scalas, so this is a good time to start looking for a pair.  Or more than a pair, if you like surround sound.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Islander said:

 

If you’re really patient, keep on saving and look for a pair of La Scala IIs.  They have stronger bass, which makes it appear to go lower, although it actually doesn’t.  As well, their crossovers are much more modern and their cabinets are better looking.

 

At first, there were very few on the used market, but now more are appearing all the time, sometimes at quite good prices.  Eventually, their used prices will rise to close to what they originally cost, just like with the original La Scalas, so this is a good time to start looking for a pair.  Or more than a pair, if you like surround sound.

I'm very patient. I have a great system as is, so they'll have to be a good pair locally, at either a decent price or the seller willing to trade. But if the right pair shows up, I'm definitely ready to get them based on all the comments posted here.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, svberger said:

I'm very patient. I have a great system as is, so they'll have to be a good pair locally, at either a decent price or the seller willing to trade. But if the right pair shows up, I'm definitely ready to get them based on all the comments posted here.

If you love your Cornwalls, don't sell them, it's very likely you MAY not love LA scalas. They are a VERY different sound.   I surely didn't love love they gave without subs.   That's me though, know I LOVE electronic music, lots of it.   Weird thing is, I feel confident after owning of course, that I could live with heresy IV solely, without subs.  Dime la diferencia entonces

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Westcoastdrums said:

If you love your Cornwalls, don't sell them, it's very likely you MAY not love LA scalas. They are a VERY different sound.   I surely didn't love love they gave without subs.   That's me though, know I LOVE electronic music, lots of it.   Weird thing is, I feel confident after owning of course, that I could live with heresy IV solely, without subs.  Dime la diferencia entonces

It's an excellent point you  make. I would of course try the Lascala's before the deal was final. I can tell pretty quickly if I'm going to like them or not. I like accurate bass, not over powering bass, so I don't think it would be a  problem. Ultimately, I'd rather trade my Allison One's and move the Cornwall's into a second system where they would be about 10-11 feet apart in dedicated corners. If I love the LaScala's it's also very possible I'd buy them if it was the right price for the right pair, and then figure out what to do with the odd pair out.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When it comes to subwoofers with La Scalas, it depends on what you like to listen to.  In my system, I’ve used a pair of 90-watt 8” subs, a single 10” 400-watt sub, a single 10” 850-watt sub, and a few months after that, l added a second sub, so now the system has a pair of 850-watt subwoofers.

 

I found that even with acoustic music with limited bass, like acoustic guitars and vocals, the 90-watt subs did help.  With full orchestra music or rock music, the 400-watt sub, with its 23 Hz bass cutoff, seemed to be a minimum requirement to hear all the music.  For action movies with the usual collisions and explosions, well, it comes down to how realistic do you want your explosions to be?  While it’s possible to be blasted off the sofa with the right equipment, is that really what most people want? The explosions can be part of the story, but getting the idea of the blast may be all that’s needed to tell the story.  You don’t really need to feel that you’re sitting within the blast radius.  I don’t, anyway.

 

However, when I got the first 850-watt sub, with its 18 Hz bass cutoff, it was immediately obvious that it could present the lowest bass guitar or electronic instrument notes accurately.  I was impressed!  Some people feel that if the lowest note in rock and related genres is the 30 Hz lowest note of a 5-string electric bass guitar, that’s as low as your sub needs to go.  Not quite.  For accurate reproduction of the lowest notes, your sub’s response needs to be nearly flat at that point.  If it’s 3dB down at that point, for example, those lowest notes will be 3 dB lower than the slightly higher notes.  Picky?  Maybe, but we wouldn’t have these high-performance speakers if we weren’t at least a bit picky about what our systems give us.

 

When I got the first 850-watt sub, something new emerged.  There was a severe bass peak 1-1.5 metres/3-5 feet in front of the sofa.  At first, I wondered whether my favourite Net Radio station had really cranked up the bass for some reason, but it was soon obvious that it was limited to a small area.  For curiosity, I got out my SPL meter and found that the peak zone was 20 dB louder than the rest of the room.  Adding the second sub cured that.  It evened out the bass response throughout the room.  As well, since each sub’s driver now moves half as far for the same total volume level, in theory the subs’ distortion is now cut in half.  That has to be a good thing, but to be honest, I can’t tell the difference.

 

So what’s my conclusion?  With La Scalas, the more subs and the better the subs, the better the total sound.  My system has reached a new plateau of satisfaction, and I’m really happy with it.  The levels of the subs were carefully matched to the rest of the system, and it doesn’t sound boomy or bass-heavy, it just sounds realistic.  Mission accomplished!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I heard 70s Lascalas a few years ago without subs and was not very impressed. Now this was in a large room that’s known to have bass issues, so it may not have been an ideal setup. That said, as much as I loved my Cornwall IVs, I’m very glad I bought the LS II, they are indeed an upgrade to my ears.

 

I was very surprised at the amount of bass they have on their own. And it’s certainly a very pitch accurate bass that is easy to follow in the mix. Adding a pair of subs certainly fills in what’s missing and the complete package gives me better performance than khorns did. I second the suggestion to hold out for a pair of the IIs. If I run across a good deal on AL5s, my LS IIs will hit the market….😀

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Klipsch recommends that with Klipschorns, the minimum ceiling height should be 8-1/2 feet, and more is probably better.  Since they’re a tall speaker, with low ceilings the tweeter and squawker can be closer to the ceiling than to the floor, which is not ideal.  As well, do you have corners into which K-horns can fit tightly?

 

Those are the only restrictions that I’m aware of, other than that it takes a certain distance for the sound of the three drivers to integrate, so it’s best if you can sit at least 12-15 feet from them.  They’re definitely not for near-field listening.

 

So if your house satisfies those requirements, you’re all set for K-horns, but those rules can be restrictive enough that some K-horn fans will keep them in mind when looking for a house to buy, since many houses are not “Klipschorn friendly”.

 

That said, if you’re planning to move within a year or two, some K-horn fans would go ahead and buy them, knowing they’ll be in a more suitable room within a reasonable time.

 

Hope this is helpful.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can see by the picture of my room that zi have corners that would seem to work they would be about 12 feet apart and seating position is about that also. I think ceiling height is about 10 feet but can measure. And no move planned for at least several years. Can we talk price on these threads and if so is that price the going price for these?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...