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Lascala AL5 Review From Soundstage.


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Yep, it was a good review , but he was just stating the obvious, if he  had written a bad review on the Klipsch , it would have implied  that there are better  more capable speakers out there , but I can’t really think of any speaker  that  compares  to the Lascala, there really in a class of there own . 🤓

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I noticed that the reviewer commented on the Lascalas not imaging well like many modern speakers do. Not the first time I have heard this, why would this be the case? Is it the wide baffle? I've read that the wide baffle Orangutans and the other apes series from Devore image well. The horns themselves or are they just incorrect?

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1 hour ago, YK Thom said:

I noticed that the reviewer commented on the Lascalas not imaging well like many modern speakers do. Not the first time I have heard this, why would this be the case? Is it the wide baffle? I've read that the wide baffle Orangutans and the other apes series from Devore image well. The horns themselves or are they just incorrect?

Imaging can be greatly affected by wall proximity , distance between speakers and acoustics . I noticed that the reviewers room had the speakers tight to both side and back walls ( back walls being highly reflective) and too far apart for best imaging . Reflections from nearby walls tend to interact with the speakers direct sound which confuses our sense of distance and therefore the placement of instruments . I would think that a horns controlled directivity would actually be a plus to imaging. Personally I wouldn’t put to much emphasis on the reviewers comments on this because imaging results are likely to vary greatly from one room to another.

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I get what he’s saying. Some speakers, especially monitors or slim towers can have pinpoint imaging. But who’s to say if that’s better? I will take realism that horns can create over exact imaging any day. I’ve had speakers with a deeper soundstage and more defined imaging. But LaScalas are some of the best Heritage speakers at that to me. It’s just not what they are best at.

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Pin point... or thin.

 

the horn profile of a Klipsch heritage has a wide dispersion... WIDE sound stage.

 

it's a matter of taste... I prefer enveloping and wide over thin.

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Hi I live in south Jersey, I considering purchasing a pair of Scala's AL5 but cannot find a local dealer who has them to demo. I called world wide stereo, they did not have this model in their showrooms - I guess they are too big for most showrooms . They said they would try to get a demo pair in and call me in. But that was awhile ago, and they did not leave me with any confidence by suggesting I read reviews and purchase them on their website.  "you will not be disappointed these are fine speakers".  I refuse to buy speakers of this price, without at least hearing them first! Did anyone purchase their units based solely on Internet reviews/ research? I know high-end, audio stories are rare these days. Years ago a co-worker, who is much older than I am, he was RCA electrical engineer and helped develop color television. He had a pair of these and I do remember how clear and lively there were with a 1 watt SET amp, he developed himself. I was impressed back then with the Scala's, but could not afford a pair at the time,. I have always wanted to own a pair but not sure how newer AL5 version compares.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Tony Anthony said:

Hi I live in south Jersey, I considering purchasing a pair of Scala's AL5 but cannot find a local dealer who has them to demo. I called world wide stereo, they did not have this model in their showrooms - I guess they are too big for most showrooms . They said they would try to get a demo pair in and call me in. But that was awhile ago, and they did not leave me with any confidence by suggesting I read reviews and purchase them on their website.  "you will not be disappointed these are fine speakers".  I refuse to buy speakers of this price, without at least hearing them first! Did anyone purchase their units based solely on Internet reviews/ research? I know high-end, audio stories are rare these days. Years ago a co-worker, who is much older than I am, he was RCA electrical engineer and helped develop color television. He had a pair of these and I do remember how clear and lively there were with a 1 watt SET amp, he developed himself. I was impressed back then with the Scala's, but could not afford a pair at the time,. I have always wanted to own a pair but not sure how newer AL5 version compares.

 

 

Hi, yes I bought mine used in Montreal without listening to them, have never regretted it…..Regards, Rod

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I’ve got a pair of 1974 La Scalas, plus a pair of 2007 La Scala IIs, which are very similar to the AL5s, apart from the tweeters and crossovers.  The La Scala IIs sound noticeably better than the original La Scalas, and from all reports, the AL5s sound better than the LS2s.

 

The Klipsch engineers aren’t just sitting around.  The speakers are being steadily improved, so the newest ones are the best sounding.  However, if you can hear the AL5s before you buy, you’ll be able to shop confidently, always a good thing.  It might be a good idea to expand your search radius.  If you have to drive a few hours to find a pair of new La Scala AL5s to audition, it would be worth it, if only for your piece of mind before plunking down an admittedly tall pile of cash.

 

Why do they cost so much?  When you look at them, they are nice, but that nice?  Well, the cost doesn’t come from just what you see, but from the engineering that made them possible.  Also, the new tweeters are saiid to be quite an upgrade.  They’re made by Celestion to Klipsch specs, and are a big improvement over the earlier models.  Another factor is the reason that model line is called the Heritage Series.  Two reasons, actually.  First, the speakers in that line were designed and engineered by Paul Klipsch himself, so they have the benefit of his genius in them.  The second reason they carry the name Heritage is that they have a very long life.  Unlike the foam-surrounded woofers used in most speakers today, the AL5s still use paper cones with doped-paper surrounds, which means that they last indefinitely.  My La Scalas were 32 years old when I bought them, and they tested just fine, with smooth, if limited, bass response.  Now they’re 48 years old, and they still sound great.

 

These can be your end-game speakers, the ones you enjoy now and for the rest of your life, and then put in your will, so they’ll continue to be enjoyed after you’re gone.  They, and you, will not be forgotten.

 

I did mention the limited bass response.  How can a 15-inch woofer not have amazing bass?  Well, it does, but it doesn’t go as deep as you might expect.  This is because these are horn-loaded speakers, which makes possible their ultra efficiency and ability to resolve fine details in music.  However, physics requires really big horns to produce deep bass.  The La Scala AL5s, the La Scala IIs, all the way back to the original La Scalas, are “portable size”.  Seriously.  Would you want them to be any bigger?  I wouldn’t.  Accordingly, the best way to extend their bass response all the way down into the basement is simply to add a subwoofer or two.

 

The very deep bass response may or may not be a factor for you, depending on the music you usually listen to, and your personal listening preferences.  Many owners are totally pleased with them as they are.  Once you get your speakers home and set up, listen to them for a month or two (it may take you that long to go through your whole music collection, to hear how your songs should sound), and then you’ll know whether or not a subwoofer would enhance your listening experience.

 

Good luck on your quest for great sound, Tony, and welcome to the Forum!

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Hard to believe there is no dealer close to you in South Jersey or a pair of any used Heritage horn loaded speakers one could demo.  It would be very tough to ante up for a pair of LaScala AL5 without a demo, but then again their finer points will be hard to assess in a short demo.

 

I demoed a pair of LaScala AL5 a few weeks ago and was very impressed, they did not sound anything like the LaScalas I bought new in 1981 and played for 35 years.

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Thanks all for the reply. Even though headphones I can hear the musical presence and live sound of the LaScala’s.   I do not believe I could say this about any other speaker. Most high-end speakers you listen to on the Internet sound ok but you don’t get enough distinction to say for sure. So I’m think it over tonight and MIGHT go for it (purchase)  tomorrow after noon. This will either be the stupidest thing I ever did or the best gut feeling purchase I have ever made. If it turn out to be the first then I’m done with hi-fi forever. 

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