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Have I just broken my K-77?


13Hertz
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Bored and curious this morning, I removed the 4 screws from one of my K-77 Heresy Tweeters and wanted to see how it came apart - but I think in doing so, I've broken the electrical connections probably - wanting to see if anyone who knows about these drivers can confirm?  Right now, I don't want to believe it, but I think I know the answer. 

 

If I have in fact broken it, of course the next question is:  can it be repaired?  Or will I need to purchase a new diaphragm? The wires coming off the diaphragm are smaller than sewing thread....can't see how they can be reconnected (by me).

 

Thanks.

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Might as well ask this question as well:  The reason I was taking this apart, was to see how the lens connected and how it separates from the magnet and diaphragm.  I've been looking at the aftermarket lenses that replace the existing lens and mount flush to the front of the motorboard.  

 

How does the lens come off of the K-77?

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@13HertzYes, you pulled it apart in reverse order. You have to hold the rear of the assembly together and wiggle off the horn. 

 

There is a DIY fix that is tricky and very time consuming. It is easier to replace the diaphragms (in both). 
 

Use someone that uses the Klipsch part and will use a signal generator to make sure the diaphragms are properly seated after the repair. 
 

https://reconingspeakers.com/products-page/klipsch-k77f-127126-diaphragm/

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Reminds me of the veddy, veddy British manual for the SME tone arm in about 1969, in which they cautioned, "Do not take it to pieces."

 

I can't decide whether that is my favorite, or Luxman's use of just the right amount of feedback to "avoid evil effect."

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16 hours ago, 13Hertz said:

can it be repaired?    

 

 the chances are  very slim   but  it's not impossible  , it can only be repaired if  there is a  section  leftover of the old leads  , and   , the tweeter VC  windings must not be damaged . 

 

you would need a large magnifying glass to check the damage , 1st remove the diaphragm , flip it over , remove the gasket 

do you see any leads coming out of the voice coil on both polarities ?  yes , you can repair it  , no , it's toast 

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You Klipschians are SO AWESOME, I swear to God.

 

Thanks for all the responses and info.

 

Considering purchasing 2 new aftermarket diaphragms from Simply Speakers for about $22 each to replace both.  Pretty sure they will do the trick, but can anyone comment as to whether or not the horns will sound the same?  Worse?  Better?  Any other sources for these diaphragms?

 

@ Mark 1101:  I'm also going to check out your drivers for sale - thanks for bringing that to my attention.

 

 

Screen Shot 2022-10-10 at 1.16.51 PM.png

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@13Hertz Yes please, don't buy the cheap diaphragms. I bought them last year thinking they were high quality. But they are the cheapest from China. Follow Dean's advice and buy reasonably good spares from his recommended source. My garage measured my old diaphrgms and they refused to fit my cheap new ones. They were really right. Unlike the Atlas diaphragms after 50 years, the K77 ones are still very good.

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Heresys, or any other Klipsch Heritage Series speakers, are premium products and should never be repaired with cheap parts.  Klipsch parts will maintain their high performance, while 2nd-grade parts will compromise it.  Even if the cheaper parts are much cheaper, they're false economy, since they'll downgrade your fine speakers.

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20 hours ago, OO1 said:

 the chances are  very slim   but  it's not impossible  , it can only be repaired if  there is a  section  leftover of the old leads  , and   , the tweeter VC  windings must not be damaged . 

 

you would need a large magnifying glass to check the damage , 1st remove the diaphragm , flip it over , remove the gasket 

do you see any leads coming out of the voice coil on both polarities ?  yes , you can repair it  , no , it's toast 

 

You should be able to take a multi strand speaker wire, unwind it and use one or two of the thin wires to repair this is you are very good at soldering.

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If this tweeter is to be repaired, the first thing to do is to carefully detach the diaphragm from the wrong side. The diaphragm must be placed with the dome facing forwards on the plastic part where the fine wires must be soldered on.. It sticks to the magnet, wrong side, but before soldering the connections it has to be detached from the magnet and only at the very end of the repair the magnet is carefully guided through the 4 screws to reassemble it. In this way, it is safely immersed in the sensitive voice coil.

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2 hours ago, tigerwoodKhorns said:

You should be able to take a multi strand speaker wire, unwind it and use one or two of the thin wires to repair this is you are very good at soldering.


You also have to desolder the old lead. All of this has to be done without melting the plastic housing. 

 

Good DIY project for someone with good skills. 

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12 hours ago, Islander said:

Heresys, or any other Klipsch Heritage Series speakers, are premium products and should never be repaired with cheap parts.  Klipsch parts will maintain their high performance, while 2nd-grade parts will compromise it.  Even if the cheaper parts are much cheaper, they're false economy, since they'll downgrade your fine speakers.

100% agree - and it's only the Cheapskate within me that would lead me to even considering "economy" solutions for my Heresy's.

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as OO1 suggested, I looked closely at the diaphragm that I stupidly damaged by disassembling the K-77 the wrong way and I see that there is copper wire still connected to both POS and NEG sides of the unit (about 1/4" of super fine wire).

 

Also, on my K-77, there's no plastic parts - it's all metal.  The diaphragm sits down into a metal dish and the diaphragm seems to have a cardboard gasket attached to the back of it (maybe fused to it over time?).  Not sure. 

 

It can't hurt for me to try and repair this diaphragm using the method suggested by tigerwoodKhorns - sounds......possible.....but, I doubt my chances are very good at success due to my less than expert soldering "skills".  I'll let you guys know how it turns out. 

 

Also, since there is wire still connected to the diaphragm, I was able to get my meter on it and confirm that it has continuity.  That's good news.

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12 hours ago, KT88 said:

If this tweeter is to be repaired, the first thing to do is to carefully detach the diaphragm from the wrong side. The diaphragm must be placed with the dome facing forwards on the plastic part where the fine wires must be soldered on.. It sticks to the magnet, wrong side, but before soldering the connections it has to be detached from the magnet and only at the very end of the repair the magnet is carefully guided through the 4 screws to reassemble it. In this way, it is safely immersed in the sensitive voice coil.

Understood - thank you.

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