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Forte original version questions


aviavi123

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Hi. I have an opportunity to buy a pair of original model Forte loudspeakers. The crossovers have been replaced with Crites, and the titanium diaphragms have been replaced. 

 

1. What are the differences between the original and subsequent Forte versions?

2. Did the originals have a good reputation?

3. Does the crossover replacement and diaphragm replacement seem advantageous? 

Thanks. 

Edited by aviavi123
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I can vouch for #2.

The others, not so much.

Had a pair hooked up to my Welborne Labs Laurel ll 300b mono blocks.

They sound amazing with tubes.

I lost them in a divorce along with a bunch of my other audio gear. 😭

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The original Forte had a fantastic reputation.  There were the first Klipsch model that I owned where I was "satisfied" with the sound (after trading up from kg2 and kg4).  They were my main speakers for 15 years.  Julian Hirsch's review in the July 1896 issue of Stereo Review magazine was wildly positive (https://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-HiFI-Stereo/80s/HiFi-Stereo-Review-1986-07.pdf, page 48).  Here's a quote:

 

"It is not easy to be dispassionate about the Klipsch Forte. Its distortion and sensitivity measurements are so outstanding that comparison with most other speakers is impossible. In addition, these speakers just plain sound so good that we will hate to pack them up and send them back to Hope, Arkansas! In absolute terms, and especially at its price, the Forte would be hard to match, let alone surpass."

 

I find the "other brand" titanium tweeter diaphragms to be an improvement over the stock phenolic ones.  I replaced all the tweeters in my KLF-20/30 with them (originals were poly).  Whether the crossovers are an improvement will depend on if the capacitors in the originals were going bad.  This is sometimes a controversial topic.  However, neither replacement should be detrimental in any way.

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23 hours ago, aviavi123 said:

Hi. I have an opportunity to buy a pair of original model Forte loudspeakers. The crossovers have been replaced with Crites, and the titanium diaphragms have been replaced. 

 

1. What are the differences between the original and subsequent Forte versions?

2. Did the originals have a good reputation?

3. Does the crossover replacement and diaphragm replacement seem advantageous? 

Thanks. 

If it is a good deal just buy them.  It is that easy. 

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On 3/3/2023 at 5:12 PM, aviavi123 said:

  

 Does the crossover replacement and diaphragm replacement seem advantageous? 

 

  Forte III are now selling at  low prices  ,  the replacement aftermarkets parts for a  Forte speaker offer ......0 advantage over the factory parts ,

 can you post pictures of the speakers , let's see what they look like  

 

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18 hours ago, MMurg said:

The original Forte had a fantastic reputation.  There were the first Klipsch model that I owned where I was "satisfied" with the sound (after trading up from kg2 and kg4).  They were my main speakers for 15 years.  Julian Hirsch's review in the July 1896 issue of Stereo Review magazine was wildly positive (https://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-HiFI-Stereo/80s/HiFi-Stereo-Review-1986-07.pdf, page 48).  Here's a quote:

 

"It is not easy to be dispassionate about the Klipsch Forte. Its distortion and sensitivity measurements are so outstanding that comparison with most other speakers is impossible. In addition, these speakers just plain sound so good that we will hate to pack them up and send them back to Hope, Arkansas! In absolute terms, and especially at its price, the Forte would be hard to match, let alone surpass."

 

I find the "other brand" titanium tweeter diaphragms to be an improvement over the stock phenolic ones.  I replaced all the tweeters in my KLF-20/30 with them (originals were poly).  Whether the crossovers are an improvement will depend on if the capacitors in the originals were going bad.  This is sometimes a controversial topic.  However, neither replacement should be detrimental in any way.

Thanks for posting this, an amazing review and the magazine as whole is a great time capsule. The 80s really don't seem that long ago to me but I guess that says more about my age.

Within the review itself something in particular caught my eye:

 

The Forte's bass response was not as surprising-it is hard to imagine a Klipsch speaker being bass shy!
Nonetheless,the bass seemed to reach downward beyond what we have usually experienced with other speakers.

 

I have been of the opinion for many years that we live in an age of unrealistic bass and bass expectations. Our speakers seemed fine back in the day as did our generally lower powered amps/receivers. I attribute this to both certain forms of studio engineered popular music ( hip hop and such),as well as the influence of home theatre which mainstreamed sub woofers. Something I never saw in the 70s or 80s.

 

 

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On 3/5/2023 at 8:26 AM, Southern said:

Forte 1's were built with plywood, not MDF.

 

My pair of original Forte were from the first batch the dealer ever got when they were introduced.  The instruction sheet included with the speakers (below) said cabinets were made of lumber core panels.

 

Forte sheet (Large).jpg

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3 hours ago, MMurg said:

 

My pair of original Forte were from the first batch the dealer ever got when they were introduced.  The instruction sheet included with the speakers (below) said cabinets were made of lumber core panels.

 

Forte sheet (Large).jpg

I'm not a wood expert but not sure what a "solid lumber core panel" is, I noticed that my Forte 1's have 5 ply's by looking at the edge when I had my midrange out recently.

After having my Forte's for a number of years, I would never recommend 1/2" to 1" rear spacing, nor would I recommend tow-in of the speakers.  I get better imaging with them facing straight forward.

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19 minutes ago, Southern said:

I'm not a wood expert but not sure what a "solid lumber core panel" is, I noticed that my Forte 1's have 5 ply's by looking at the edge when I had my midrange out recently.

After having my Forte's for a number of years, I would never recommend 1/2" to 1" rear spacing, nor would I recommend tow-in of the speakers.  I get better imaging with them facing straight forward.

 

Lumber core is a type of plywood where there is a thick "core" of lumber sandwiched between one or more outer plys.  The '81 Belle that I'm using as a center speaker is also made of lumber core panels.  The pic below is the back edge of bass bin top panel.  In this case there is only one ply on either side of the lumber core.  It's a painted edge and I've cropped this out a larger pic (since I don't feel like moving it to get a better closeup), so it may be hard to see.  My original Forte were the same.  I guess Klipsch used both types of plywood during that period.  Maybe price and availability drove what was used at any given time.  If any Klipsch employees from the period have an insight, that would be appreciated.

 

image.png.8438399d574b4b5ced2598decff0f096.png

 

The small rear spacing on that sheet was just a minimum recommendation, basically a warning not to put them up against the wall.

 

PWK would likely disagree with you about the toe in: http://assets.klipsch.com/files/Dope_750801_v15n2.pdf.  If you have imaging problems when toeing in, usually there are reflecting surfaces between the speakers causing it.

 

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41 minutes ago, MMurg said:

 

Lumber core is a type of plywood where there is a thick "core" of lumber sandwiched between one or more outer plys.  The '81 Belle that I'm using as a center speaker is also made of lumber core panels.  The pic below is the back edge of bass bin top panel.  In this case there is only one ply on either side of the lumber core.  It's a painted edge and I've cropped this out a larger pic (since I don't feel like moving it to get a better closeup), so it may be hard to see.  My original Forte were the same.  I guess Klipsch used both types of plywood during that period.  Maybe price and availability drove what was used at any given time.  If any Klipsch employees from the period have an insight, that would be appreciated.

 

image.png.8438399d574b4b5ced2598decff0f096.png

 

The small rear spacing on that sheet was just a minimum recommendation, basically a warning not to put them up against the wall.

 

PWK would likely disagree with you about the toe in: http://assets.klipsch.com/files/Dope_750801_v15n2.pdf.  If you have imaging problems when toeing in, usually there are reflecting surfaces between the speakers causing it.

 

Thanks for the explaination of lumber core.

I don't have any imaging problems, my Forte's are only 6' apart and I find that they image better when facing forward.  My RF7's on the other hand are towed in.

At least I don't have Klipschorns over 2' from the rear wall like a local Klipsch dealer, PWK would definately disagree (as well as Roy).

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