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False corners screwed into K horns?


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  • 2 weeks later...

There is 12 feet between them C to C. If these speakers are supposed to be so f****n great, why are they such a PITA every time I turn around. Everyone sais something different about them. They are really BIG and difficult to work with. I am getting real tired of this. (I'm venting) Can someone come to my house (that knows what they are doing) and listen to these for my. I'm in Greenfield, MA....They sound real nice, but I don't think they are the cats ***.

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Oh, and another thing....... Can someone please explain in plain english, How can speakers work that well if they are in corners, wait, with the rear flares (walls) facing directly at each other. What happens to the bass that collides with itself, and/or gets mashed around with all the wires, curtains, and back of the component stack- mess??. Shouldn't that bass get directed (I know- omnidirectional), toward the front?? Sorry for the rant, but I hope someone out there understands where I'm coming from. Thanks

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Mine are along the short wall, only 11 feet corner to corner. I don't have false corners or rotate them away from their 45-degree setting, and most likely (and fortunately) don't know how they would sound if I did. They do sound fine to me. I've always regarded the large, long-length bass waves as being too big to be troubled by wires, bolts, and things, and have assumed that wave fronts join rather than clash, as they head to the front of the speaker along the walls. Tracking down what makes K-horns sound sub-optimal can be a real PITA. The usual suspects are sound sources and electronics, as you know. They sure can be finicky. Good luck!

EDIT: Woops, forgot another big suspect, the room (and the crossovers if yours weren't so new). Lots of threads on the forum on room acoustics. My relatively untutored view: I prefer sound absorbing furniture and, personally, carpet, and I don't like bare or nearly bare rooms.

Larry

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Larry, how large is your room overall? I found a huge difference in sonic quality moving the Khorns from one room to another.

As far as the bass waves go ( I think a 30hz sound wave is something like 30 ft. if it was able to be measured ) you probably are getting a lot of cancelation if your room is small. I hate to say this but the Khorn is a very demanding speaker and you will never get 100% out of them unless evreything is right. Now that I said that you can get darn close with good electronics and accoustical treatments.

Does that help you at all? If not I have some info that I could send you that may help.

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----------------

On 4/18/2005 5:13:59 PM Dylanl wrote:

Larry, how large is your room overall? I found a huge difference in sonic quality moving the Khorns from one room to another.

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Mine is 12' by 18', but the only two usable corners are across the one short end, and I don't have any other rooms to move them into in this little 1930's Cape Cod. I agree moving them can make a big difference, but I've concentrated on tailoring electronics and sound sources because I'm limited in room options. Anyway, I was saying that I felt I had good sound in spite of the narrow-end room problem.

Larry

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  • 8 years later...

Let's put it this way.............my walls are very heavily braced, 2x4 studs, standard 16" o.c. spacing with staggerd horizontal 2x4 stops with some staggered vertical studs inbetween, with four 2x12 plates lag bolted into the foundation wall on each side, the studs wedged tightly against the foundation wall, 1/2" solid core marine grade plywood 8' out from the corners, 5/8" Gypsum sheetrock over that, with the Khorn's tailboard secured to a cut down cut-to corner-fit mitered 2"x12" air-tight corner plate with (8) 1/4" lag screws and the corner plate secured to the wall with (10) 1/4" lag screws.

The wall still vibrates. (and so do the dishes in my neighbor's kitchen 40 or 50' away, maybe more) 3.gif

My wall is shorter than Artto's, and it does not vibrate audibly. If you put your hand against it, you can feel the vibration, though. The old wall it replaced danced all over the place. The old one was made of 16" O.C. 2 x 4s with plywood and siding on the outside and sheet rock on the inside. It could not deal with the Klipschorn's assualt. The new wall has closer than 16" O.C, 2 X 6s, 3/4 plywood and exterior siding toward the outside world, and 3/4 plywood screwed and glued covered by 5/8 sheetrock also screwed and glued (with staggered seams) toward the listening area.. As I said, it vibrates, but not audibly. Windows on the other end of the house rattle. A former neighbor said it used to shake her house, but I doubt that. The floor and couch in the listening room move dramatically, even without the sub (the drums on Fanfare for the Common Man will temporarily throw a sturdy table out of square). There is something about the impact that doesn't seem to be explained by the SPL figures.

Listening to Khorns at full orchestra levels (or movie Reference level) is an earthmoving experience.

Edited by Garyrc
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PWK's last home didn't have a proper corner for the right channel because of a window - so I'm pretty sure he did it.

I've seen some threads in the last month or two with Klipschorns in less than ideal placement situations, where the typical false corner solution wouldn't work. My method provides a work around.

The best solution is enclosing the back like the 60th Anniversary Edition. However, I'm not a woodworker, so I came up with this. These solutions allow for some flexibility not afforded by the traditional method, namely, being able to turn the Klipschorns into the listening area, as well as getting them off the walls. This funnels all of the low frequency energy into the room as opposed to losing what seems to be a considerable amount into the walls - especially if one or both are placed using inside walls. The bass becomes more LaScala/Jubilee-like in its behavior. There is no degradation in low frequency response as long as the Klipschorns remain within 12" of their respective corners.

Edited by DeanG
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Dean, I understand your method and that you like the outcome. I'm also not pointing to a right answer, just standard described by Klipsch.

Earlier on in this thread, there was a comment about concrete. If one were to interpret the 48" length in the above manual prescription one could have a decent cinder block false corner, and cheap too.

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