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whtboy

DTS receiver with a real tape loop?

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Hi,

Can anyone recommend a good DTS/Dolby 5.1 receiver that has a real tape loop so I can use my equalizer with it for both analog and digital stereo sources?

Thanks!

-Jacob

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Also, having preamp outs would be a big plus in case I ever get around to triamping my L-R speakers. I've looked on the Onkyo and HK sites and they don't mention anything about tape loops.

Thanks!!!

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what is your budget? and remember any receiver with a vcr input also has an output. So it's still a real tape loop, just labeled vcr.[;)]

check out the Yamahas and Denons

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My current receiver (yamaha rx-v530) has VCR ins/outs but it doesn't function as a traditional tape/effects loop.... meaning, it sends L-R line level outputs to VCR-out and it will play whatever comes in on VCR-in when you select VCR as the input...

... but any modifications made by the VCR or EQ are disregarded. It's not a proper tape loop (on my yamaha anyway).

-j

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Even with a "real Tape Loop" you are only going to EQ you mains. What you want is an external processor loop for all channels. I have not seen a receiver capable of this.

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I'd be ecstatic to be able to EQ my mains if I could do it on all my stereo sources instead of just one. I don't care so much about EQ'ing my center or surround channels.

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just got back from target... $18 bought me a 3 way left/right/video selector box =)

not pretty but it'll get the job done.

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The Denon AVR-4800 and AVR-3300 can do it, but all subsequent units dropped the ability. I still run a DBX array and it is still important to me to have a functional tape loop. I found a dedicated A/V pre/pro that can do it, my NAD T163.

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Can anyone recommend a good DTS/Dolby 5.1 receiver

that has a real tape loop so I can use my equalizer with it for both

analog and digital stereo sources?

If you moved to seperates, then you could just run the analog pre-outs

into your equalizer and then from your equalizer directly into the

amplifier powering your mains.

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hehe, yeah i thought about that too... but that would be way outside my budget

what about just a seperate amp with your receiver as a pre/pro. Some good used amps can be found on audiogon.

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my current receiver doesn't have preamp outs =\

hmm... that's definitely something to keep in mind if i can find a decent used dts receiver.... thanks!!!

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my current receiver doesn't have preamp outs =\

hmm... that's definitely something to keep in mind if i can find a decent used dts receiver.... thanks!!!

check audigon, and Harmon Kardon has an ebay store. www.jr.com always has good prices, especially when they are closing out models. JR also sells factory refurbs sometimes.

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Look for a H/K receiver that is a couple years old like the 510. This series had pre-outs that just jumpered back into the internal amps for all channels. It would be simple to run the pre-outs into an EQ and then back into the internal amps.

Laters,

Jeff

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hehe, yeah i thought about that too... but that would be way outside my budget

Well, what is your budget? And what speakers will you be powering? How

big is the room, how far away do you sit, and how loud do you like it?

And why do you feel you need the equalizer?

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hehe, yeah i thought about that too... but that would be way outside my budget

Well, what is your budget? And what speakers will you be powering? How

big is the room, how far away do you sit, and how loud do you like it?

And why do you feel you need the equalizer?

budget - undecided

speakers -

L/R - cornwalls

center - heresy

rear - cambridge soundworks ensemble

the room is relatively small, maybe 11x14. my head is about 7' back from the mains. i don't listen too loud most of the time unless i'm in another room.

i'm currently using the eq to tone things down around 8-16Khz - my cornwalls seem excessively bright and harsh to me in that range. i also drop 100-160Hz down quite a bit because my room seems to resonate pretty heavily around there. and i also bump it up a little bit around 40Hz just because i like to feel the lows when they hit =)

i've got a persian rug high on the wall behind my listening position and i have a homemade fiberglass (R13) acoustic panel directly behind my head to absorb the mid/hi frequency reflections that would be coming off that wall.

the carpet is very short, almost hard, and there is no treatment at all on the ceiling, but there is a ceiling fan in the center of the ceiling.

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What year cornwalls you running? That harshness you describe is pretty

common amongst the other cornwalls I've heard...and so is the 80-160Hz

problem [;)] The harshness is pretty easy to tame - you're probably due

for a crossover refresher and some rope caulk on the horns (if you have

the older metal horns).

It sounds like you're very happy with your EQ, but there is some

benefit to getting the same results without adding the extra circuitry

in the signal path.

Also, many of the newer quality recievers have built in EQ sections as

well - so if you're in the market for a new receiver, then this might

be an alternative to consider (one that leaves you with a lot more

options).

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What year cornwalls you running? That harshness you describe is pretty

common amongst the other cornwalls I've heard...and so is the 80-160Hz

problem [;)] The harshness is pretty easy to tame - you're probably due

for a crossover refresher and some rope caulk on the horns (if you have

the older metal horns).

It sounds like you're very happy with your EQ, but there is some

benefit to getting the same results without adding the extra circuitry

in the signal path.

Also, many of the newer quality recievers have built in EQ sections as

well - so if you're in the market for a new receiver, then this might

be an alternative to consider (one that leaves you with a lot more

options).

1977. I've already replaced the caps and the tweeter diaphragms too =)

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I just bought a used Marantz SR5400 AV receiver... 6x90 watts. It's got preamp outs on all 6 channels.

I've got all my sources going directly into the receiver, then L/R preamp outs -> EQ -> Sonic Super T-Amp -> Cornwalls. The receiver is directly driving the Heresy center channel & surrounds.

The funny thing about this receiver is that there is no stereo + sub output option. The only way to get a signal going out the LFE-out channel with a stereo source is to use "circle surround 2" in stereo mode, but then that runs the center and surround amps as well which ruins the natural stereo imaging.

My compromise on that is to have 2 seperate inputs to the sub... one coming from the LFE on the receiver (which has a signal when I'm watching dolby or dts movies) and another coming from the low pass crossover that is conveniently built into my EQ, which I switch to when I'm listening to stereo sources.

It's a little ghetto, but it sounds good and whether I'm listening to stereo or dts/dolby stuff the sub volume is tied to the volume on the receiver, so I'm not having to constantly dial in the right amount of bass output.

The T-Amp is obviously not the best piece of gear to be driving the corns with, but it's what I've got onhand and it is will drive them past my normal listening levels.

Thanks for all your input!!!

PS - be careful running pro audio gear with home audio gear. I ruined the LFE circuit that was built into my Yamaha receiver by overdriving one of the analog input circuits by turning the gain up too high on the EQ. =\

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