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DIZ ROTUS QUESTION


DRBILL
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DIZ ROTUS wrote:

"Now, if you recall, some time ago you indicated that you would share some non-privileged information regarding your relationship with PWK. While anything you'd be willing to share would be of interest, I'm specifically interested in whether your knowledge and ownership of Klipsch speakers preceded your acquaintance with Paul W. Klipsch."

Sometimes, as a clergyman -even a retired clergyman- it is difficult to know what should be revealed about a former parishioner, even deceased. What would you be willing to reveal about a dinner conversation with a trusted friend? Ethics has recently taken a back seat in modern society. We see this in our government every day. It is a sign of the decay of our civilization.

DizRotus asked a simple question that I can answer without compromise.

The simple answer is "no." I first knew Paul when I was a high school student. I had several jobs --a bench tech at a local Radio/TV shop, and as an apprentice pipe organ builder with a local craftsman.

The latter was my introduction to Paul W. Klipsch. We had several tuning/maintenance contracts at churches in Hope. Every time we were there we made it a point to go out to the plant to see Paul. My employer, B. Lecil Gibson, was interested in becoming a Klipsch dealer. With his broad exposure to area churches, he was interested in selling sound reinforcement equipment to his clients as well as Klipsch upgrades to electronic organ speakers.

I was making 75¢ per hour at the radio shop and 50¢ per hour as an organ builder apprentice. So, no, I owned no Klipsch speakers.

I continued to be an organ builder throughout college and continued to see Paul on a fairly regular basis.

While in seminary, I worked as a DCE in a parish in El Dorado, Arkansas. There were several "boy bands" in the parish. I would often take them to Hope to meet Paul and to try out his speakers. I remember one occasion when a bass player was invited to hook his amp up to a prototype of a La Scala. This unit had a plexiglass window to observe the excursion of the woofer. After two notes, the excursion exceeded anything thought possible. Paul cursed lustily and stormed out of the room. The interview was over and we loaded up and left.

As luck would have it, after ordination, I was assigned to St. Mark's, Hope. At the same time, Paul and Belle were having strong difficulties as Presbyterians over predestination and election. Paul was of the opinion that anyone could lift themselves from the mundane muck of life and achieve wonders. He offered himself as an example. Not pridefully, because Paul was really a very humble man. So, he was quite easy pickings for the Episcopal Church. It was not his first encounter. When he and Belle were fleeing political unrest in South America, they were married by the boat's Captain using the Book of Common Prayer. (Bogart: "African Queen!")?

I ran into Paul at the Diamond Cafe across from St. Mark's one morning. He remembered me. I invited him to church. He and Belle were confirmed the next time the Bishop came. Soon, he was elected to the Vestry. And my preaching had to improve instantly! Seriously! Paul listened with intensity. The BULLSHIT button was proffered regularly at the back door.

When he took a LaScala home to replace the Heresy next to his TV, he sent the Heresy to me. I cobbled together a home made match made from klipsch parts gleaned by my wife through the influence of Belle. So these were the first Klipsch speakers on my lot.

After the 1979 tornado in Wichita Falls, Texas, Paul called me to ask if the Klipsch speakers had survived. The answer was "No." He said, "Send them to me. I want quality controll to see them. I did. A month later a truck pulled up in front of where we were rebuilding our house and unloaded two H's. The note said "Klipsch speakers unconditionally guarranteed." (!). I still have them.

Then, in the course of things, I inherited a pair of 1957 plywood K-Horns from the estate of a brother priest. They were ugly, but my how they sounded! Then I inherited a pair of Cornwalls from a parishioner. Then I bought my modern K-Horns which are in service.

All other equipment was disbursed to my kids, who are more rabid about Klipsch than I could ever be. All of their stuff is Klipsch one way or another.

Well, Diz, is this enough?[:)]

DRBILL

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At the same time, Paul and Belle were having strong difficulties as Presbyterians over predestination and election.

This is certainly off topic, but they certainly weren't the first to have this problem, and the difficulty is still causing problems for many. My rationale was different than that of Paul and Belle, but I moved anyway. [;)]

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Marvel,

I don't want this to become a venue to beat up on Calvinists, BUT I have a joke that needs telling:

Didja hear the one about the old Presbyterian gentleman that fell down a steep flight of stairs? He got up, brushed himself off and exclaimed, "I'm glad that's over with!"

DRBILL

  • Haha 2
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"What became of the '57 Khorns?"

They are in a tin barn in Haltom City, Texas. Tired of getting citations for noise, the Me Thinks band (two years in a row voted #1 hard rock band in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex, by the Fort Worth Weekly) offices there and practices there. My son, Will III, is the drummer and my son-in-law Christopher Lundy, is bassist. With the old K-Horns, they can realy hear what they sound like with instant replay. So there is no excuse. Who am I to say? You can't argue with success. They start their programs by shouting "We're just like all of you, except we are getting bald and have mortgages!"

Would Paul have been at peace having his gear treated thus? You bet your bippy he would! From a tin building to a tin building!

DRBILL

SEE: http://www.me-thinks.com/news.html

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Marvel,

I don't want this to become a venue to beat up on Calvinists, BUT I have a joke that needs telling:

Didja hear the one about the old Presbyterian gentleman that fell down a steep flight of stairs? He got up, brushed himself off and exclaimed, "I'm glad that's over with!"

DRBILL

I haven't laughed that hard in a long time! As a lifelong Episcopalian married to a Presbyterian girl for the last 20 years I am sure you can understand why!

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We are really more in agreement than not. I know of a LOT of that kind of mixed marriage.

Now, I'll get back to audio. Love the long story about Paul and your speakers. That's the kind of stuff that needs to be in a book.

Oh, and I was mostly kidding about the almost getting fired part.... mostly.

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This comparison of Presbyterians to Episcopalians is interesting but somewhat lost on a lapsed Christian Scientist.[1] When I was growing up I thought Presbyterians were about as bland as Protestants could get. After reading How the Scots Invented the Modern World by Arthur Herman I have a whole new understanding of the more complex side of Presbyterianism, but I'm not certain that I get the joke. I assume it has something to do with predestination. Is he commenting upon the fact that it was predestined that he'd experience that fall, so now he's glad it's over? If so, do Presbyterians drive as if everything is predestined and beyond their influence? If so, we need to put stickers on their cars.

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As some might recall, I recently had a bout with a kidney stone. Thats not an experience I would have wanted to endure without modern medicine and serious pain killers.

 

FYI, the landscape is riddled with former Christian Scientists: my three siblings (save our bi-polar sister), Robert Duval, Alan B. Shepard and Ellen Degeneres, to name a few. When Christian Science was founded in 1876 it advised avoiding three things: alcohol, tobacco and doctors. In 1876 all three were good advice. Today its just two out of three, but 2 out 3 will get you inducted at <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Cooperstown.

 

 

 

[1] DISCLAIMER: As someone who was raised by Christian Scientists but escaped, all opinions are my own and are not those of The First Church of Christ Scientist or any other organized (or disorganized) religion, fraternal club or tribe.

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Neil,

You are correct that the joke is about predestination. One can, however, find much in the Catholic Church on predestination as well. A Reformed (Presbyterian) Bible teacher at the college ewhere I work likes to point out that the Reformed Tradition just pushes the thoughts/ideas of predestination farther than most other groups.

There is an odd balance between God's Sovereignty (total control) and Free Will (man's responsibility). At best, our heads can't really grasp how the two can co-exist. If God is in total control, then we become robots. If we have total free will, then God isn't really God. So different denominations are (in this oversimplified explanation) all somewhere along this scale from one extreme to the other.

The Bible prof. I first mentioned likes to point out that in the grand scheme of things, it probably doesn't really matter.

Reading the likes of Augustine, Aquinas, and others of the early Church Fathers can help understand, but sooner or later you just have to let go of what is more peripheral and accept what is the central message of the Gospel. It isn't 'science' as Mary Baker Eddy taught. Most major branches of Christianity will agree on the main points of salvation and a life in Christ, with the final goal of life after death (our earthly death anyway) in Heaven with God - the Beatific Vision.

Wow... all opinions my own (sorta). No offense meant, blah blah blah...

Have a great day!

Bruce

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  • 2 years later...

Fer shure, Arky. I do not recall this thread, but it was about the time I got my 'horns and joined the forum, so I may have missed it. In spite of one of our Forum brother's declaration of "SEE I TOLD YOU I WAS RIGHT," this proves to my own satisfaction that my judgement of these men was the correct one. For men of true honor, there is no question of wondering what is or is not off limits. If there is any question, it is ALL off limits. Gen. Robert E. Lee is my touchstone in such matters.

Rev. Dr., if you are out there I'd like to thank you for great times, sacred and secular, in your ministry as Vicar of the Magnolia parish. Gordon Earl Maroney and I had great times as your entire eccelsastical court for that little group in that tiny, beautiful little church, and the discussions we had helped shape and guide my life, theological and otherwise. The visit you organized with PWK remains the audio equivalent of a personal meeting with the Pope.

Dave

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  • 2 years later...

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