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SONY Playstation 3 with true 1080p Blue-Ray Technology


aviserated
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Actually, the X-box 360's external HD-DVD player WILL output a 1080P over VGA cable for HD-DVD's, upscaled DVD's, and video games that are programmed for 1080P ( and will upscale them if they aren't ). It will also allow a 1080P upscalled video game ( up to 720P upscalled dvd's ) over component video.

I have seen both the Xbox 360 and PS3 side by side on identical Samsung 52" 1080P DLP tv's ( I work at a Best Buy, and when doing our overnight reset and putting the PS3 demo out, we goofed off and put it on the big tv for about an hour ), both with Maden 07 ( PS3 demo version, retail on 360 ) and there was NO graphical difference between the games. The 360 was hooked up the standard way with component video cables ( no hd-dvd drives yet ) and the PS3 was hooked up HDMI to the tv set. Did not do a movie comparison because we did not have enough time, nor would it be fare to play a blue-ray vs a standard dvd.

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Hence, Sony's marketing machine is full of crap once again.

It is not only SONY. Look at all the other big companies that have jumped on Blu-Ray technology.

1.3

Who developed Blu-ray?

The Blu-ray Disc format was developed by the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA), a group of leading consumer electronics, personal computer and media manufacturers, with more than 170 member companies from all over the world. The Board of Directors currently consists of:

Apple Computer, Inc.

Dell Inc.

Hewlett Packard Company

Hitachi, Ltd.

LG Electronics Inc.

Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.

Mitsubishi Electric Corporation

Pioneer Corporation

Royal Philips Electronics

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.

Sharp Corporation

Sony Corporation

Sun Microsystems, Inc.

TDK Corporation

Thomson Multimedia

Twentieth Century Fox

Walt Disney Pictures

Warner Bros. Entertainment

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In any case I feel it is too early to jump on the 1080p bandwagon. First till a clear format is closen. Second 1080p are very expensive vs 1080i. And lastly for tv viewing there is still very little hd(1080i) progamming. Imagine how long it will be until 1080p programming is available. Yes I am sure there is a small improvement in picture quality, if you pic the right source material. But the improvement is like the difference between hd and standard digital cable. But for now there is not nearly enough material available for 1080p. I would rather wait until the technology improves and a clear format is chosen for the hd dvd's

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Display Infocus 7210 DLP Projector

Native Aspect Ratio:

16x9

Supported Aspect Ratio:

4:3, 16:9

Brightness: (Video Optimized Lumens)

Whisper: 950 max ANSI lumens
High Bright: 1100 max ANSI lumens

Contrast Ratio:

2800 : 1 Full On/Full Off

Display Technology:

720p+ DarkChip3 DMD DLP by Texas Instruments

Data Compatibility:

640 x 480, 800 x 600, 1024 x 768, 1280 x 1024, 1280x720

Video Compatibility:

Full NTSC, PAL, SECAM, 480i, 480p, 576i, 576p, 720p, 1035i, 1080i, 1080p/24, 1080p/30

Color Wheel (DLP Only):

7-segment, 5-speed

Native Resolution:

1280x720

Projector Placement:

Ceiling Projection, Rear Projection, Front Projection

SMPTE Brightness:

Up to 132"/3.35m wide, 16:9 screen

Lamp Wattage:

Whisper: 220 Watts
High Bright: 250 Watts

Lamp Life:

Whisper: 3000 Hours
High Bright: 2000 Hours

Minimum Image Size:

-1 ft (-0.3 m)

Maximum Image Size:

-1 ft (-0.3 m)

Standard Lens Zoom:

1.3 : 1

Standard Lens Throw Ratio:

1.67 - 2.08:1 (Distance/Width)

Standard Lens Image Offset Ratio:

116% (16:9)

Standard Lens Projection Distance:

5 - 32 ft (1.52 - 9.75 m)

Digital Keystone Correction (Vertical):

+/- 20°

Digital Keystone Correction (Horizontal):

+/- 9°

Lens Shift:

Not Available


Inputs and Outputs

DVI:

Number of Inputs: 0
Requires M1 to DVI cable

M1:

Number of Inputs: 1
Accepts VGA and DVI with M1 cable

HDMI:

Number of Inputs: 0
Requires M1 to HDMI adapter

BNC:

Not Available

Component (RCA):

Number of Inputs: 2
Gold RCA

VESA (HD15):

Number of Inputs: 1
15-pin analog

S-Video:

Number of Inputs: 2
4-pin DIN, no progressive support

Composite (RCA):

Number of Inputs: 1

Standard Definition TV:

Inputs: Composite RCA, S-Video, Component RCA, D5

Enhanced Definition TV:

Inputs: Component RCA, M1-DA, VESA, D5

High Definition TV:

Inputs: Component RCA, M1-DA, VESA, D5

Computer:

Inputs: M1-DA, VESA

HDCP Support:

Yes

Stereo RCA Jacks Inputs:

No

Stereo 3.5 mm Mini-jack Inputs:

No

12v trigger for motorized screens (3.5 mm mini-jack):

Yes

Projector Control:

Remote, Projector Keypad, RS-232

Speakers:

Not Available

Monitor Output:

No

Audio Output:

Not Available


Compatibility

Data Compatibility:

640 x 480, 800 x 600, 1024 x 768, 1280 x 1024, 1280x720

H-Sync Range:

21 - 91kHz

V-Sync Range:

50 - 85Hz

Video Compatibility:

Full NTSC, PAL, SECAM, 480i, 480p, 576i, 576p, 720p, 1035i, 1080i, 1080p/24, 1080p/30


General

Audible Noise:

Not Available

Actual Dimensions:

Height: 4.3 in (10.92 cm)
Length: 12.8 in (32.51 cm)
Width: 13.8 in (35.05 cm)

Actual Weight:

9.5 lbs (4.31 kg)

Shipping Dimensions:

Not Available

Shipping Weight:

Not Available

Projector Warranty:

2 Year

Lamp Warranty:

90 Days

Accessories Warranty:

90 Days

Operating temperature:
(at sea level)

50 - 104° F (10 - 40° C)

Maximum Altitude Supported:

10000 ft (3048 m)

Typical Power Consumption:

220 Watts

Maximum Power Consumption:

250 Watts

Power Supply:

100 - 240 Volts at 50 - 60 Hz

Menu Languages:

French, English, Italian, German, Korean, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Norwegian, Russian

Approvals:

UL, c-Ul,TUV GS, GOST, C-Tick, NOM, IRAM, FCC B, CISPR22/EN55022, EN 55024/CISPR 24, CB certified according to IEC60950/EN60950; 1997, P(SE), MIC

OK, so this is my projector. I use the Denon 2910 DVD player and upscale it to 1080i.

I also set my Comcast hd box to send it at 1080i as well.

Both look incredible, breath taking like clear, but now this thread has me confused.

Are you suggesting I have it all wrong here and go re set it to 720p?

Will a 1080p dvd player look as great or better on this too? The Denon 2910 is amazing!

If so, why? BTW, Sunfire Theater Grand IV pre amp too.

Your thoughts?

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Wait guys. You aren't even discussing all the relevant numbers here. 1080p at 24hz (or 48 or 72 or 96) is indeed superior to films shown at 1080i 60hz because it eliminates the judder created by 3:2 pulldown.

Now of course there aren't that many displays that currently can accept and display such outputs, but if the OP wants to plan a HT for the future to put together, he is thinking in the right direction.

For everyone else, whether or not 1080p 60hz is better than 1080i 60hz depends on whether or not the 3:2 pulldown performed by the player is better than that your display can perform (which in new displays should be minimal).

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"Are you suggesting I have it all wrong here and go re set it to 720p?"

Yes, the Infocus 7210 native resolution is 720p.

You set your DVD player to 1080i output and in effect it deinterlaces the source of 480i scales and reinterlaces the signal to 1080i. When your projector receives the 1080i it deinterlaces again (possibly just a 'bob' to 540p) and then scales to the native resolution of 720p.

You set your DVD player to 720p and the player deinterlaces to 480p then scales to 720p. Your projector should accept the 720p directly and project it without additional scaling. End result is less video processing and jumping around with the signal. That is assuming the 7210 doesn't do some sort of overscan scaling or anything like that when fed native rate 720p.

Shawn

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"I will stand by my observations that the difference in video quality between a 720P set and a 1080P set is staggering. "

No one is claiming otherwise.

You started off the discussion talking about staggering differences between 1080p and 1080i which is a different discussion then the difference between 1080p and 720p.

Shawn

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Infocus 7210

Display Technology:

720p+ DarkChip3 DMD DLP by Texas Instruments

Data Compatibility:

640 x 480, 800 x 600, 1024 x 768, 1280 x 1024, 1280x720

Video Compatibility:

Full NTSC, PAL, SECAM, 480i, 480p, 576i, 576p, 720p, 1035i, 1080i, 1080p/24, 1080p/30

Color Wheel (DLP Only):

7-segment, 5-speed

Native Resolution:

1280x720

So your saying the cable box and DVD player even if it upconverts it more should be set at 720p? Because the native, is in fact, a 720p resolution... even with 1080i or 1080p upconverts in the HD box or DVD players and is availiable?

I can try that and see. I know some arguments are that 720p is better than 1080i anyhow.. I will say at times... going back n forth, 1080i is better. I can't prove it, and have not seen a full 1080P through my Infocus 7210, but I guess your saying even if I did have a blue ray player at 1080P, it would in fact, downconvert it to 720p, based on my projector right...? The few 1080i signals on HD TV are fantastic...

I can experiement back n forth if this is the case.

I think your saying Roger, your maximum best picture native is 720p so send it a 720p signal and it will look better? Is that your thought?

I will tell you it is STUNNING in 1080i now.. what will I notice or not notice? hmmmmmm

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"Because the native, is in fact, a 720p resolution... even with 1080i or 1080p upconverts in the HD box or DVD players and is availiable?"

Your Infocus will just turn around and scale them to 720p, its native resolution.

"I know some arguments are that 720p is better than 1080i anyhow.."

That has to do with video sources material with lots of motion. 1080i video deinterlacing could show deinterlacing motion artifacts while the 720p material is already progressive so no deinterlacing artifacts. Also that is talking about material that originates in those two formats, not different resolution material that is scaled to those resolutions.

"I guess your saying even if I did have a blue ray player at 1080P, it would in fact, downconvert it to 720p, based on my projector right...?"

Yes, it would.

"your maximum best picture native is 720p so send it a 720p signal and it will look better? "

For upsampled DVDs yes.

For HD content if it originates as 720p leave it as 720p to the projector and you avoid any unneeded scaling/deinterlacing which just causes artifacts. For 1080i *source* material (not upsampled lower resolution material) you should try it as 1080i out of the source and 720p out of the source. If the source has a better 1080i deinterlacer then the projector it will look better feeding 720p to the projector. If the projector has the better 1080i deinterlacing the picture will look better feeding it 1080i from a 1080i source.

Shawn

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Here is screenshots of scaling artifacts.

This is projected by an AE900 also a native 720p projector.

Using test patterns from my scaler. The test pattern is verticle lines one pixel apart. In other words one line of one pixel width on, one pixel width line off and so on all across the screen.

In this case the scaler is feeding 720p (native rate) to the projector and the projector has OVERSCAN OFF to have 1:1 pixel mapping.

post-12845-1381931458909_thumb.jpg

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Here is another picture of the exact same test pattern (1 on 1 off) fed to the projector at 720p however in this case the projector has overscan on. This rescales the picture to slightly enlarge it for overscanning.

Notice how the test pattern is distorted. That is basically distortion from the extra scaling....

post-12845-1381931458961_thumb.jpg

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I can't recall if this one is the scaler putting out 1080i or 480p( I might have the order backwards) with the 1 on 1 off pattern. Because this is not native rate to the projector the projector is rescaling the signal to 720p. Overscan is off in this picture.

post-12845-138193145906_thumb.jpg

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Moral of the story..... avoid scaling more often then needed.

If the source material (before processing) is at the native rate of a

digital projector one should feed that material at its native rate.

For source material at a non-native rate if you are going to scale in

the source scale directly to the native rate of the display to avoid

having the display turn around and rescale the material another time.

If the display has a better deinterlacer or scaler then the source

device feed the material to the projector at whatever the actual source

resolution is and let the display handle any needed

deinterlacing/scaling to its native rate.

If the source device has the better deinterlacing/scaling then the

display for non native rate material use the source device to do the

deinterlacing/scaling to the native rate of the display.

Shawn

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