Jump to content
The Klipsch Audio Community
Sign in to follow this  
JamesS

Klipsch La Scala models

Recommended Posts

Pro, LSI models, or "home" versions?  La Scala II came out in 2006.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After some additional research on the LaScala:

 

3. LASCALA:

  • 1963: The La Scala is designed as a portable version of the Klipschorn to be used as a P.A. system for Winthrop Rockefeller's Arkansas gubernatorial campaign. Component designations were: Woofer K-33-J (Jensen), Midrange K-400 horn and K-55-V driver (Atlas), Tweeter K-77 (Electrovoice).
  • 1966: The designation for the Type 1RC crossover network was changed to Type A. 
  • Sept 1967: Transition to the K-33-M. The records are not clear as to the origin of this driver but it is believed to be an Eminence driver with an Alnico magnet.
  • Jan 1968: Transition to The K-33-P Woofer (CTS Paducah KY)
  • 1971: The Type AA crossover network was introduced featuring Sneer diode tweeter protection.
  • 1974: K-56 mid-range driver (Electrovoice 1828) is used for a short period as a temporary replacement as the supply of K-55-V drivers was interrupted.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975? - 1979: K-33-E (Eminence) and the K-33-B were used interchangeably.
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively.
  • 1983: The Type AL crossover network was introduced incorporating steeper filter slopes for enhanced tweeter protection and smoother response in the crossover regions.
  • 1983: The Type AL-2 network was introduced to accommodate the new K-55-M mid-range driver. This Electrovoice sourced driver was essentially the same as the previous K-55-V with a smoother response.
  • 1987: The aluminum K-400 horn was replaced with the K-401 structural foam horn resulting in slightly improved distortion figures.
  • 1989: The AL-3 network was introduced to correct for a shift in the output of the K-55-M mid-range driver.
  • 2000: Electrovoice ceases production of the K-77-M and K-55-M tweeter and mid-range drivers. The search for replacement drivers and the acquisition of the EV tooling is sought. Very limited production of a few pairs occurs at the end of 2000 and the early months of 2001 using existing part stocks
  • May 2001: The Atlas PD-5VH (Current version of the previous K-55-V) is modified slightly and christened the K-55-X. The various components of the K-77-M tweeter are either retooled or sourced from the new owners of the tooling and assembled by a third party. This variant of the tweeter is designated the K-77-F. An entirely new network (AL-4) was created to accommodate these driver changes. Fusing is eliminated in favor of a polyswitch for tweeter protection. The tweeter on the La Scala was flush mounted for the first time using "Z" brackets. A metal input panel with binding posts in a bi-wire configuration replaced the traditional screw type barrier block.
  • Dec 2005: The La Scala II debuted as the first "finished" version of this model featuring a two piece veneered cabinet utilizing 1" MDF instead of the traditional 3/4" plywood. The AL-5 network was introduced to compensate for the improvement in low frequency response resulting from the change in cabinet construction. The HF and LF cabinets stacked together using thick rubber isolating spacers. Finish variants were  reduced from 6 to 3.
  • April 2006: The horn portion of the K-77-F tweeter was re-tooled to include a recessed flange eliminating the need for the separate "Z" bracket and attachment rivets, the new designation is the K-77-D. This also allowed the updating of pre-Z bracket La Scala’s (prior to May 2001) to flush tweeter status without motor board modification.
  • 2008+: There have been a number of new versions produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/18/2019 at 1:55 PM, JohnA said:

Pro, LSI models, or "home" versions?  La Scala II came out in 2006.

Hey JohnA', in your picture, you have the LaScala that I am used to looking at in my downstairs living room. They have a decent history just from the previous owners. I was given rhe set of soeakers by close family friends, Chris & Ardis Bodily. Ardis maiden name is Hewitt, she has(d) a sister, a sister called Janie. Janie's married name was Janie Hewitt Harris, and was married to a man named Gene. When Janie passed away, many years ago now, Ardis was kind enough to have thought about me when deciding what to do with Genes old Speakers. It was no coincidence she thought of me though. I live In Boise Idaho and thats where I went to high school at Borah High. In 2005 I was chosen as the Gene Harris Jazz Festival, festivals honorary lead Trumpet player in the festivals top performers group, which if familiar at all with jazz festivals, you'd know how great of an honor it is to be selected, let alone to having had the chops, atleast that particular week, to impress a group of often times tired, hungry judges, enough so to be honored with the lead Trumpet part in Jazz Police, which screams. Ardis admired my passion for music, but Jazz in particular. Ardis is the one who gave me my username. I'd often overhear her say something like "and then you'd hear some choice 12 lettered's, look over and theres that cat Codacious, you know Shellys boy.." 

 

Anyway, I doubt knowing who owned my speakers before me truly matters all that much if at all. I doubt that I, or even Ardis, could prove the legitimacy of that history. It is how it happened, but that is neither here nor there. 

 

The cabinet in your photo is quite a few shades darker than that of my cabinet. Aside from some decades of having been moved around from a couple place, the shape of my LaScala is top notch, all the wirinig is perfect, no replacement is needed for the forseeable future , none of the metal is tarnished or otherwise oxidized. Its the cabinets which are less than perfect, but in no way shape or form are they in bad shape. A chip or two on either speaker, a few small indentations, and a very small amount of other blemishes that are really all fairly laughable when considering the age of LARGE, HEAVY, WOOD, that moves around with the owners. From the humidity of seas, dryness of deserts, the heat, the cold, the bumpy, the dusty the careless and acts off god and just bout a million other reasons why most things decades old that are large, wooden, heavy and move when the owners move, wouldnt mke it to 2020, let alone make it to 2020 lookin and sounding SEXY AS HELL!

 

Unfortunately, a few things have recently happened in my life causing me to have to sell just about everything that completes me as a human being. My Klipsch LaScala are on that list. If you could potentially help me out with more history regarding my exact Speakers.. like if I send you pics of the stapled on birth certificates on the backs of the speakers, which are also in great shape minus a little fading, maybe you could pull some information for me. I also dont even know where to begin selling a seriously rare, and amazing finds like OG Klipsch speakers, and to be taken seriously. I would like someplace where I foumd only people who are true stereophiles or music listeners, not those who have no clue. If you cant understand why these, or speakers like them, come with such a heavy price tag, then please dont lean on the paint man. I meed a place with only fanatics where I can feel good about knowing Genes speakers are in great hands.

 

Since I was blessed with my speakers, something inside me has always felt like, even though we never met, he is looking down from heaven keeping tabs on his Klipsch speakers nd makimg sure to keep whoever has them in line. Theres a real energy about these particular speakers. As if all the late nights spent entertaining Gene with some crisp clear High Fi audio, or perhaps they took on the role of being the first speakers blessed with projecting his newest tunes, before the album's ever went to the stations or even before being sent out to the record company for their stamps. I could spend days thinking about what it would be like to be Genes main Speakers, and to see what they saw, but Id rather listen to them tell me all about it. And they do. Theres a definite energy with these speakers and its because the beaitiful wood literally absorbed and recorded their history, all those emotions and events hve neen imprinted on Genes speakers and now they have that story to tell. Maybe instead of sell them, ill just marry them.

 

Any info, will help, names, emails, websites, prices, extra history.. or if you need from me,  anything,  codywoody13@gmail.com

 

Thanks

 

Cody

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome Cody.

 

Photos of your speakers, especially the paper tags with serial numbers, will help.  I’ll send you an email with more detailed suggestions and questions.

 

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes.  Please post pictures,  including the back labels.  If they have letter code SNs, The Historian can probably give more specifics, like original dealer.  Another gentleman, wvu80, here tracks sale prices.  The Klipsch Forums has a for sale section.  Ebay will often bring an appropriate price.  Craigslist works, but may not bring the best price.  Reverb is another good selling site.  Condition will set the price, provenance not so much. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...