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ARX

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  1. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    In this thread some topics were touched on, that may not be clear and obvious to everybody. This easy to understand AES paper deals with some important issues related to horns, waveguides and drivers. Here's part 2.
  2. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    I came to the same conclusion through different reasoning and sources, as I don't have first hand experience with K510 or K402. OS disciples are plentiful....that is: among the DIY crowd. To my knowledge OS waveguides were used in only a few professional products from the 1990's. It's rather old news by now. With the advent of advanced modeling and simulation techniques, only fundamental theories remain functional. This is not to dismiss OS waveguides completely, but to put things in perspective.
  3. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    That's an interesting observation on the throat. I've looked closely at images of the K510 MK1 & 2 as well as the K402. Specifically the throat area, because it's this part of any horn that affects the aforementioned higher frequencies. It appears there's (possibly) a very clever solution incorporated in the Klipsch throats. This is the throat area of the K510 with mumps: What can be seen in this image? This clearly isn't the typical round to rectangular (duct) transition as present in the ZXPC horns. The left and right side of the throat comprise a kind of slot, before the mumped section. Even more interesting are the corners of the throat entrance, which are identical in the K402 (but correct me if I am wrong). "Segmented triangles" are visible, which may (or may not) function as a kind of mini-waveguide inside the actual horn.
  4. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    Chris, agreed with all your points. One little caveat with regards to my observations of the BlueHorn. With "high frequencies" I meant the upper midrange (2 to 4 kHz) and above.
  5. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    I like the zebrawood. What driver do you use with the ZXPC horn? Is the horn used as center?
  6. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    Back on topic, more or less. A comparison between a MeyerSound Archeron horn (> predecessor of the BlueHorn) and the ZXPC 10x18. Thanks to @Chris A for the data on the ZXPC horn. CAD Drawing of the MeyerSound Archeron: Low frequency driver: 15 inch cone driver Enclosure dimensions: width (w) = 31 inches height (h) = 35 inches depth (h) = 21 inches Horn locating dimensions: x = 15.5 inches y = 9.38 inches Horn axis to driver center spacing: s = 14.37 inches The Waveguide: Horizontal: Vertical: Improved vertical beamwidth which includes a signal processing circuit including cross-over circuit portions, and demonstrating extended beamwidth control from 500 to 800 Hz: ZXPC 10x18 Inch Drawing: Horizontal: Vertical:
  7. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    I am familiar with (the sound) of older MeyerSound stuff, mainly their line arrays, and some of their cinema speakers. In the past I had some conversations with the local distributor. Meyersound line array products face fierce competition from brands such as: l'Acoustics, Adamson and not in the least d&b Audiotechnik. Based on (listening) experience, I would personally choose l'Acoustics and d&b over MeyerSound as far as line arrays are concerned, but that's not to say MeyerSound is bad. Not at all. MeyerSound PA has been referred to as clinical and sometimes harsh sounding, which should come as no surprise once you dive deeper into their technology and considering their background in studio monitoring/mastering. In PA, the cleanest, most linear, FIR compensated or otherwise pre-processed signal doesn't always translate to the best (most enjoyable) front-end experience, especially with less talented people behind the desk. Cinema installs are less prone to cluttering, which should work to MeyerSound's advantage.
  8. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    I bet it is expensive, and of high quality. Obviously, MeyerSound horns are at least a little better than a white label horn. Presumably BEM/FEM optimized for the dedicated driver and comparable to the waveguide in JBL's 4367. Upon examination some features stand out. Its depth relative to expansion (curvature). From a wide angle the throat is still visible. This should ensure even off-axis radiation of high frequencies. The vertical walls are asymmetrical > the "ceiling" is more curved towards the mouth. The bottom section is relatively flat, probably to facilitate better integration with the woofer. For the same reason C-C spacing is minimized. It's noteworthy both horn and woofer of the monitor are surface-mounted, whereas the subwoofer sits flush with the baffle. @Khornukopia What's that beautiful veneer?
  9. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    These are major contributors to MeyerSound's performance:
  10. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    Lucas and Meyers' relationship goes way back indeed and it's logical to support each other('s business). Nothing wrong with that. Key factor in Meyersound R&D is its integrated design approach. Subsequently, it's not sensible and often nearly impossible to use their products outside of their ecosystem. With the older products, especially the 650-P Subs you mentioned, it was less problematic to use these seperately. From a premium brand with corresponding pricing you'd expect top-notch performance and Meyersound delivers... most of the time. However, after reading the marketing blah-blah on their latest BlueHorn System and looking at the horn in question, I wonder what kind of voodoo takes place in that black hole between the driver exit and the horn entrance. It's should give rise to performance levels way beyond anything this cheap ebay horn could ever deliver.
  11. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    I wonder if this decision was marketing related, induced by technological progress, or both. Meyersound delivers turn key products with SOTA active amplification + DSP. However, I doubt the raw drivers will better the TADs. The Archeron horns from the EXP series are nice, but way too small for large theatres. In reference to what @Chief bonehead said about the requirement of active crossovers for the K402's, the same goes for the Meyersound Archerons. So they either use the side channels for infill, custom large format horns or line arrays.
  12. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    Probably something like this: And for mains:
  13. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    Yes, and this was installed in the main theater: During that period, Klipsch obtained a large share of the Commercial Cinema market.
  14. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    HP9040 at home: EV's HP9040 and 6040 are (still) very impressive with regards to coverage/directivity, which is controlled from 400 Hz upwards, both vertically and horizontally.
  15. ARX

    Klipsch K402 like horn?

    Without details available it's conjecture, but bearing in mind the THX certificate, I guess it's safe to assume these are constant coverage horns. Speaking of which, apart from the mouth, the KPT-941-T-HF doesn't seem to deviate all that much from the JBL 2360. Another reference would be the Electro-Voice HP9040.
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