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DizRotus

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Posts posted by DizRotus


  1. Heresys, preferably Is, bought well from eBay or elsewhere plus a used HK 430 are the best bang for the buck in audio IMHO.

    My son uses his HK 430 to power '82 Heresys (HK 430 and Heresys all for less than $400 from eBay). With efficient Klipsch speakers the power to size ratio is counter intuitive. We hooked the HK 430 up to Cornwalls and they played louder than the Hereseys at the same position on the volume control. Your fine HK 430 would produce a prodigious amount of low distortion volume from any Klipsch Heritage speaker and most other Klipsch speakers.


  2. The original post regarding these Cornwall IIs is at the link below.

    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

    http://forums.klipsch.com/idealbb/view.asp?topicID=63579&sessionID={7C53B274-BA67-42A6-8C17-4FA84BB647A6}

    download.asp?mode=download&fileID=36087&

    Since creating that post, Ive exchanged emails with Grant Okamura. The Cornwalls are recessed into the acoustical tile. Look closely at the gap in the tile around the riser on the left. It is easier to cut acoustical tile than to saw plywood. What you see through the ports is the unfinished wood.

    Ive attached part of the response from Dr. Okamura (typos intact). He explains how they came to be wall mounted, why it was a mistake and how much better they are when used properly.

    The Klipsch Cornwalls don't sound very good in that configuration. Our AV guy just went in and placed them up there and I wished he had consulted with me before doing it. I've spent years as an audio consultant and have designed speakers and used to do modifications to amps and stuff. Have not done the amps stuff recently and advances in amp design has left me behind. I love tube amps and there are only a few transistor amps that I think are ok. But I still do a lot of audio work. The Cornwalls don't work very well in its present location. The tweeter and midrange fire way over the heads of the students and they sound their best standing in the percussion section. They are spaced too far apart for good imaging. Because its on the balcony face the surface area does not give enough reinforcement to the bass and they sounds really thin. On my equipment it has a roll off around 110 so it sounds more like a midrange speaker. I sometimes bring it a subwoofer that I designed and it sounds much better. We have another set of Cornwalls in a different room and it sounds very good there. It has a very exciting sound with a bit of resonances here and there but they seem pretty controlled.



    The solid surface to which the speakers are attached is several inches behind the surface of the acoustical tile, i.e., the need to cut openings in the tile the shape of the speakers. The tile would never support the weight of the Cornwalls.


  3. Since creating this post, Ive exchanged emails with Grant Okamura. The Cornwalls are recessed into the acoustical tile. Look closely at the gap in the tile around the riser on the left. It is easier to cut acoustical tile than to saw plywood. What you see through the ports is the unfinished wood. The view through the ports of my Cornwalls is the same, and I assure you that they have not been sawed rip-style.

    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

    Ive attached part of the response from Dr. Okamura (typos intact). It should be interesting and it might help to persuade you that no one was stupid enough to cut the speakers rather than cut the tile to fit the speakers.

    The Klipsch Cornwalls don't sound very good in that configuration. Our AV guy just went in and placed them up there and I wished he had consulted with me before doing it. I've spent years as an audio consultant and have designed speakers and used to do modifications to amps and stuff. Have not done the amps stuff recently and advances in amp design has left me behind. I love tube amps and there are only a few transistor amps that I think are ok. But I still do a lot of audio work. The Cornwalls don't work very well in its present location. The tweeter and midrange fire way over the heads of the students and they sound their best standing in the percussion section. They are spaced too far apart for good imaging. Because its on the balcony face the surface area does not give enough reinforcement to the bass and they sounds really thin. On my equipment it has a roll off around 110 so it sounds more like a midrange speaker. I sometimes bring it a subwoofer that I designed and it sounds much better. We have another set of Cornwalls in a different room and it sounds very good there. It has a very exciting sound with a bit of resonances here and there but they seem pretty controlled.

    The solid surface to which the speakers are attached is several inches behind the surface of the acoustical tile, i.e., the need to cut openings in the tile the shape of the speakers. The tile would never support the weight of the Cornwalls.


  4. It was gratifying to see that the Director of Bands, Grant Okamura, chose speakers that are twenty years old and out of production for the band practice room. Obviously, he chose them because of their ability to accurately reproduce the recordings of their practices. A single microphone hangs from the ceiling approximately 10 feet in front of each speaker. Unfortunately, I was unable to find out about the rest of the sytem, or to hear them in operation. Grant is a trumpeter, so we know he likes horns.


  5. It's difficult to see from the photo, but they are IIs from 85 or later. They do not have the metal EV tweeters. The plastic horns are flush mounted on the motorboard. They are recessed into the acoustical tile, i.e, they appear to be thinner.


  6. Craig. We should share a ride to one of these some time. I could be standing at the side of I-69 as you head toward Chicago; we could then collect Audio Flynn as we left Metro-Detroit.

    I'd go to this one, but I'll be in Honolulu chaperoning a high school band trip. It's dirty work, but someone's got to do it.


  7. Tweeter diaphragm replacement is easy. I did it many times without a problem.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

    I know this is heretical, but in the mid 70s I used four Speakerlab SK-Horns powered by a Dynaco ST-400 for a mobile DJ business. Tweeters were regular victims of 600 watts (300/side into 4 ohm load). I had an open account with EV. Id call them on a Friday and have new diaphragms by the following Tuesday. As Chris Robinson recommended, I always kept spares on hand.

    Since switching to more realistic power and decibel levels, Ive never blown a tweeter in my Hereseys or Cornwalls.


  8. Permanently attached false corners worked for me.

    I know this is heretical, but in the mid 70s I used four Speakerlab SK-Horns powered by a Dynaco ST-400 for a mobile DJ business. Knowing the speakers would be moved often and that real corners would not always be availableread NEVERI used the plywood shipping crates to make false corners attached to each speaker.

    I never measured the difference in bass response between placements in real corners and freestanding with the false corners, but there appeared to be no difference. In either configuration the bass was prodigious and tight. One customer who called to schedule a return engagement asked if the price quoted included the drummer. It was all I could do to convince her that there had not been a drummer at the earlier engagement.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

    The one time I met PWK he was surprisingly diplomatic about my confessed use of the Speakerlab copies. He allowed that it was better to subject the impostors, rather than real Khorns, to the abuse of 600 watts of SS power, junior high students and frequent assaults by hand-truck.

    Actually, they were perfect for the task. Unloading four black plywood obelisks never failed to impressneither did the sound. Invariably, as the first speaker was unloaded, someone would ask, Is that the speaker? to which I would reply, Yes. There are three more.

    The size made it impossible for someone to walk off with one of the speakers when my back was turned. I did have to put hardware cloth (wire mesh) over the mouths of the squawker horns and over the backs, to prevent mischief. Once a napkin had been stuffed into a squawker horn and another time a kid unscrewed an Atlas squawker driver. I got it back after the principal of the school announced that there would be no more dances until it was returned.

    If I ever supplement my <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Cornwalls and Hereseys with Khorns, I will again go the affixed false corner route.


  9. Check out the description (revised) of some Hereseys on eBay. One can only wonder in what way it was revised.

    "UP FOR AUTION IS A PAIR OF HERESY KLIPSCH,TYPE H-OL.THEY HAVE CONSECUTIVE SERIAL NUMBERS 148X735 AND 148X736.INSPECTED BY JUDY PURTLE AND TESTED BY RICKY CLARK.THEY WERE MADE IN 1982.PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL COMPONETS ARE ORIGINAL.THESE SPEAKERS ARE IN VERY GOOD CONDITION.THEY DO HAVE SOME MOUNTING HOLES IN THEM BECAUSE THE WERE HUNG IN MY LIVING ROOM FROM DAY ONE.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

    "THE ONLY REASON WHY I'M SELLING THESE BABIES IS BECAUSE THE WIFE WENT OUT AND PURCHASE A BOSE LIFESTYLE SYSTEM.SHE CLAIMS SHE WANTED SOMETHING NEWER LOOKING.TRUST ME SOMETIMES I LOOK AT HER A FEEL THE SAME WAY ABOUT HER.THE HERESY SOUNDS SO MUCH BETTER,BUT YOU CAN'T ARGUE WITH THE WIFE.IF IT COMES BETWEEN MY LA SCALAS AND MY WIFE THATS EASY(SHE'S GONE)

    "IF YOU LOOKING AT THIS YOU KNOW THE SPECS ON THESE."

    If you want see the entire listing go to:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=47094&item=7307959381&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW


  10. Does the Dearborn Almas store stock Heritage? The <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Almas in Birmingham doesn't. They have performed expert work on a Dynaco tube amp at a reasonable rate. They seem knowledgeable and aren't pushy, but, like most places these days, they emphasize HT over 2 channel.

    I assume from your avatar that you're a Spartan fan. If you ever spent time in East Lansing did you visit the Stereo Shoppe? They were (are?) a Klipsch dealer. In the late 70's I attended an event put on by The Stereo Shoppe that featured PWK and his three channel setup. He and the setup were most impressive.

    I hope the Spartans play better against Old Dominion than they did against Iowa.

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