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Tasdom

KP-450B

13 posts in this topic

I picked up a pair of these over the weekend (both the HF and the LF cabs) and will be setting them up in my garage. I bought some last year but never got to use them as another forum member bought them from me.

My question is, what is the recommended hook up on these. It appears the HF section has the crossover panel but not sure whats in the LF section. Both have XLR terminals and binding post with dual sets of binding post on the LF section.

Do these connect together somehow to maintain the proper crossover network and time align?

Thanks in advance for any help and suggestions....

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literature attached. I've always thought these were very cool looking cabinets, nicely portable. XLR for a speaker input, ok whatever Klipsch. At least it's locking and heavy duty. Personally I'd retrofit those the NL4's usually theyre the same panel mount size. From the reading on the spec sheet sound like the network is set up at 650 Hz (probably just first or second order - 6 or 12 db/octave slope). Most likely one of the plugs on the network should be marked INPUT, which is from your amp, probably the top one. The other should be the crossed-over output to the LF cabinet.

Remember that this passive network isn't a terribly steep slope and won't protect the HF driver (or sound very good) at high output levels. If you're using them in the shop, fine. But if you take them out to an a band through them, I'd highly recommend bi-amping them with an electronic crossover. This would require four channels of amplification, two for LF and two for HF.

I'll post the network schematic next if I have it.

KP-450.pdf

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LF section, I'm not sure, maybe this is inside the woofer cabinet and the two jacks on the HF network are just in parallel. Ok, looking at this it's a choke and a cap, that's a Low Pass Filter for the woofers, 12/db octave slope. Simple, so this chases the high notes away from the woofers. If you plan on using in high-power bi-amp applications, I'd consider bypassing this.

KP 450 LF.pdf

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HF section crossover - reviewing, this is a High-pass filter for the horn section, and it has a little notch filter involved as well (to tame out some nasties). This is for the horn only, so my best guess is that if there are two jacks on the input cup of the HF section, they are just in parallel. Hook your input to EITHER of these, and hook a jumper cable from the other one to the bass bin. Each cabinet has it's own part of the network. In multiple cabinet stacks, this would make wiring significantly easier.

KP 450 HF.pdf

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"and it has a little notch filter involved as well (to tame out some nasties). "

It's mainly impedance correction, it does cause broad attenuation of the midrange in conjunction with the 25Ω series resistor.

These sound OK in the VHF (and the bass), I think they need a cone-driven mid horn if you really want to use them for PA.

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Thank you both! That's exactly what I needed!

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HF section crossover - reviewing, this is a High-pass filter for the horn section, and it has a little notch filter involved as well (to tame out some nasties). This is for the horn only, so my best guess is that if there are two jacks on the input cup of the HF section, they are just in parallel. Hook your input to EITHER of these, and hook a jumper cable from the other one to the bass bin. Each cabinet has it's own part of the network. In multiple cabinet stacks, this would make wiring significantly easier.

Heres pics of the input panels. Only one set of jacks on the HF section.

Posted Image

Posted Image

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same rules apply, each cabinet has the network for it's own drivers and does not affect the other. I just guessed it'd go into HF section first. Plug into either plug on LF box, jumper to HF box. Easy beasy. Of course you've got a three pin connector there and have to figure out which is + and - and make sure the phase is right between the two boxes and stereo pairs. Best to inspect each jack cup from inside if there's no markings or diagram. How else will you make up speaker cables? But I'd really go to NL4 locking connectors. They're the modern standard for pro sound gear. Get them from Parts Expess NL4FX is the cable end plug, there are a few different styles of the socket, it'll be NL4MP for Male, Panel mount. Parts with an R have the larger round mounting flange, which you probably don't want.

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Thanks for the suggestions. I made the connections from LF to HF with 12 ga and banana plugs and input the amp to the other LF input. Very pleased with the sound and still in awe at the output of these speakers........Thanks again!

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I've had success with removing the jack cup, taking the offending (XLR in this case ) plug out, clamping firmly to block of wood ( so you can find a center point) drilling out the plastic jack cup (takes a 15/16 for NL4) - and reinstalling professional NL4 twistlock connections.

post-10755-1381986110086_thumb.jpg

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LF section, I'm not sure, maybe this is inside the woofer cabinet and the two jacks on the HF network are just in parallel. Ok, looking at this it's a choke and a cap, that's a Low Pass Filter for the woofers, 12/db octave slope. Simple, so this chases the high notes away from the woofers. If you plan on using in high-power bi-amp applications, I'd consider bypassing this.

Had to get inside the LF cab thru the driver to fix 2 nuts that came loose to the grills. Here's a pic of the xo for your archives [:)]

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Unless you are going to plug and unplug quite often don't see how changing to nl4's changes anything!

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