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WMcD

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About WMcD

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  1. WMcD

    Wife's Mom passed away

    Prayers for all involved. WMcD
  2. I posted an article regarding reforming electrolytic caps in this thread. But there is no mention of other types. WMcD
  3. Quartets are the baby bear of the Chorus, Forte, Quartet family. There were Chorus iI and Forte II but no Quartet II. So there is no reason to ask if they are a (I) or II. The Quartet is similar to the II versions of the Forte and Chorus. They all have the tractrix (magic!) midrange and bass is augmented by a drone (passive) woofer. I like the bass response on my Quartet and specs show it's better (deeper) than the Heresy series. One issue is that they are short. I have mine on risers. WMcD
  4. Interesting to see that it explains, quite well, how PP can be Class A or B or AB. There has often been the explanation that PP is inherently Class B. Of course Nelson Pass presents PP Class A transistor amps. WMcD
  5. Oh, you mean for music. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_Datasette
  6. I did the split pipe insulation on my buddy's SKs. I put rectangular insulation on the edges and then the split pipe insulation over that. I also used a few triangular nips out of the split pipe to get it to go around corners. It worked well. WMcD
  7. I suspect that most rooms are bigger than we think. There is usually a door or opening to a hallway, or passthrough to a kitchen. WMcD
  8. I think the muddy effect is because there are no horns. A Klipsch product with no horns. What a shame. WMcD
  9. WMcD

    Super MWM

    I used these years ago on a project. Maybe they're the tee nut with two ears? I used them in blind holes where there was no access to the back. In any event. I found that sometime they will get canted and difficult to keep perpendicular while installing. I put them on a machine screw with a jam nut up against the brass insert to allow them to be held perpendicular while driving Better is a bolt with jam nut up against the insert and with some jam nuts near the hex head to allow use of a socket wrench. And being over cautions, used epoxy too. https://www.lowes.com/pd/Hillman-3-8-in-Brass-Standard-SAE-Wood-Insert-Lock-Nut/3012578?cm_mmc=search_google-_-Tools%20and%20Hardware-_-Dsa_tah_126_fastening%20&%20Repair-_-&k_clickID=_k_CjwKCAjwycfkBRAFEiwAnLX5IWapLO3h1wO7lg8q11dSNfnmUTs6RPJCgBx9ZvwLrUv9jq3TaIUfLBoCbsYQAvD_BwE_k_&gclid=CjwKCAjwycfkBRAFEiwAnLX5IWapLO3h1wO7lg8q11dSNfnmUTs6RPJCgBx9ZvwLrUv9jq3TaIUfLBoCbsYQAvD_BwE
  10. I have the little cousin to the Chorus, i.e., the Quartet. I replaced a tweeter diaphragm which requires unscrewing the horn.. The front panel is definitely MDF. I reinforced the screw holes with superglue because they get crumbly. I expect the back is MDF too though that is conjecture. The spec sheet for the Chorus says the riser is wood but is otherwise silent on the issues. I'm sure someone here will have first hand information. WMcD
  11. It may be that the black is lacquer. If it is typical stuff it might very well soften and dissolve with nail polish remover (acetone type). Try an inconspicuous spot with with a wad of paper towel or a cotton ball wet with the nail polish remover (or acetone from HD). If that works you can remove all the drivers, anything plastic, etc. and scrub it with a buff puff wet with the nail polish remover / acetone. Acetone and any chemical stripper might attack the glue but I'm not certain. WMcD
  12. There is an advertisement showing PWK and Heresy speakers each in 1956 and 1986. They both aged well. The 1956 Heresy shows what I believe is the cut out for a K-1000 midrange.
  13. Everytime I type I take the risk that I've grossly misunderstood what it going on. It seems to me the crossover is for 1000 Hz. Therefore we might be looking at a K-1000 midrange which later in production was replaced with the K-700. WMcD
  14. My preliminary analysis is that I've made a fool of myself by typing without knowing all the facts. More later. WMcD
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