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Klipsch Heritage "Codes"

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     There has always been a considerable interest in the serial codes, options and the history of the true original Heritage series (Klipschorn, LaScala, Belle, Cornwall and Heresy). The original "Codex" was published on the Forum several years ago, but times have changed, and with the Klipsch transition to the new forum, it appears that the document is either "lost", or deleted, etc.

     To that end, and as a reference source (again... LOL) for the collectors, and those interested in the vintage Heritage "stuff", below is the Codex V4 that covers the Heritage series through ~2008.

     Note: Things have changed, new versions are brought to the consumer, and the aftermarket (legitimate...) folks have done amazing jobs in terms of cabinet replacements, crossovers, aftermarket horns, etc.

     It's the originals for which so many questions are asked! Along with many others with Klipsch and Heritage owners who contributed to the document, here is an up to date version which covers Heritage up through 2008. Attached also is a .pdf file for vintage Heritage owners (and those looking at the older versions) to print and keep as a reference source.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

KLIPSCH HERITAGE SERIES HISTORICAL REFERENCE DATA

(V.4 – 27 January 2016):

 

SECTIONS:

 

  1. GENERAL
  2. READING HERITAGE MODEL & SERIAL LABEL CODES
  3. SPEAKER TYPE CODES
  4. SPEAKER WOOD/FINISH CODES
  5. SERIAL NUMBER CODES
  6. DRIVER CODES
  7. DRIVER TYPES BY APPLICATION (Part-2)
  8. GRILLS TYPES & CLOTH CODES (Part-2)
  9. LOGO DESIGNS (Part-2)
  10. HERITAGE PRODUCTION NOTES & TIME LINES (Part 2

 

I. GENERAL:  

          1. This information generally applies to the historical Klipsch Heritage Series; but also includes some selected information on finishes, grill cloth options and emblems/ logos used on certain later models.

          2. The data is generally correct; the author assumes full responsibility for errors.

          3. Sources include, but are not limited to:

  • Discussions, data reviews, and corrections by Klipsch employees;
  • Discussions and physical data provided by owners of Klipsch speakers; independent technicians and sources specializing in Klipsch;
  • Klipsch forum threads (extensive source material is available);
  • Klipsch reference documents, information sheets, data specs, time line sheets, etc.
  • Direct examination of Heritage series products.
  • Visits and discussion at the the factory in Hope, AR.

          4. Corrections, additions, and in particular photographs, are most welcome, and as Klipsch owners and forum members contribute additional data, the document will be updated.

 

II. READING THE KLIPSCH MODEL & SERIAL LABEL CODES:

          1. All of the "labels" through 1990+ are functionally similar. The Heritage series until 1984 were relatively simple: they were hand written, and first line was the model and wood/finish type, and the second line was the serial number (serials discussed further below).

          2. Starting in 1984 and continuing until approximately 1988, the labels were similar, however used a "stamped" serial number identification below the model & finish code. By 1988-1989, the labels were "computer" generated,  with the model, finish and other coding in a second "line".

 

                    EXAMPLE:

 

KC-BB

15T252 

 

          This tag would be for a Klipschorn, Type-C (non-"collared"), birch, black lacquer finish, serial number: 15T252 (made in 1979)

 

III. HERITAGE SPEAKER TYPE CODES:

** Does not include the "Rebel" or "Shorthorn" series.

  • C = Cornwall
  • CD = Cornwall "decorator" with flush motor board and no grill
  • BK = Belle Klipsch
  • H = Heresy
  • HD = Heresy "decorator" with flush motor board and no grill
  • LS = La Scala
  • KB = Klipschorn - Model Type B, "collared"
  • KC = Klipschorn - Model Type C, no "collar"
  • KD = Klipschorn - designer type (no grill, made through April 1987)

  

IV. HERITAGE SPEAKER WOOD/FINISH CODES:

          1. Until the late 70's-early 80's (and again in 2008 on Heritage models), customers could special order a number of exotic veneers.

          2. It should be noted that until May, 2001 there were almost 100 different finish, grill cloth, and riser 'combinations' or variants that could be ordered for the Heresy’s and up to 75 versions of the Klipschorn.

          3. In the mid-late 90's, Klipsch generally ceased most special order veneers and raw birch was also discontinued on most models, except Heresy-II's.

          4. Material for raw birch is/was Georgia-Pacific cabinet/furniture grade 7 ply (5 inner standard grade plies and the two outer very-fine grade plies).

          5. Risers for the Heritage series were originally optional, and there was a long base for horizontal placement of standard Cornwall's.

          6. Heresy risers were generally "straight" until the late 1980's, and were still an option until the late 90's. In the late 1980's the "slant" style became the general standard. Slant risers appeared in the 1970's on Heresy-Is, but are not seen often. Currently the US version Heresy is shipped with slant riser, elsewhere in the world they can be ordered with or without the riser.

          7. "Oiled" finish refers to the factory application of a high quality furniture grade wood oil that fills the pores of the wood and seals the finish. The type of oil is similar to a Watco "danish" or "rejuvenating" oil. Oiled finishes require a routine "oiling" with a light non-buildup type of furniture grade wood oil.

          8. "Lacquer" refers to the application of one or two thin coats of a clear semi-gloss lacquer sprayed on the cabinet and motor board prior to installation of drivers. That lacquer was obtained from various vendors, and as of 2013, is a #40 sheen, semi-gloss lacquer from Valspar/OPEC. Lacquer finishes only require a routine wiping off with a clean dry cloth to maintain the finish.

          9. For "Black Lacquer" finishes, the factory used a flat black lacquer primer, then #40 sheen black lacquer, with a clear #40 sheen to protect the black finish.

          10. Generally, most veneered Heritage products had the rear panels/ sections sprayed with black lacquer primer. Starting in late 1983 and continuing to this day, the rear panels of the Heritage models are now sprayed with a coat of "textured" semi gloss, and a top coat of semi-gloss black.

          11. An option to have raw birch stained was also used, but not often seen. The stain was usually applied by spraying, and the serial number stickers generally indicated this option. Example: H-WS would have been a Walnut stained Heresy made from "raw-birch". This option was more commonly seen on La Scala's.

 

CODE **                 WOOD                   FINISH          REMARKS

  • AL                Ash                        Lacquer        Uncommon
  • AO               Ash                        Oiled            Uncommon
  • BB                Birch Black              Lacquer        Common
  • BR                Birch                       Raw              Common
  • BL                Birch                       Lacquer        Common
  • BW               Birch White             Lacquer        Rare Spec Order
  • CL                Cherry                    Lacquer        Uncommon **
  • CO               Cherry                    Oiled            Uncommon
  • D-BR            Birch                       Raw              Designer (No Grill)
  • D-BB            Birch Black              Lacquer        Designer (No Grill)
  • FL                Fir                          Lacquer        Rare
  • FO               Fir                          Oiled            Rare
  • FB                Fir Black                 Lacquer        Late Models Only
  • F                  Fir                          Firzite Rare - Marine Grade
  • HL                Hickory                   Lacquer        (reported-unconfirmed)
  • MEL             Macassar Ebony     Lacquer        Rare Spec Order
  • MEO            Macassar Ebony     Oiled            (unconfirmed)
  • MHL             Mahogany               Lacquer        Rare Spec Order
  • MHO            Mahogany               Oiled            Rare Spec Order
  • MHR             Mahogany               Raw              Rare Spec Order
  • ML               Maple                     Lacquer        Rare"Hardrock Maple"
  • MO               Maple                     Oiled            Rare"Hardrock Maple"
  • MO*             Medium Oak           Oiled            Late 90's Models
  • OL                Oak                        Lacquer        Common (Red Oak)
  • OL                Oak                        Oiled            Common (Red Oak)
  • PNL*            Persian Nut             Lacquer        Rare Spec Order
  • RRL*            Rambling Rose        Lacquer        Rare Spec Order
  • PL                Prima Vera             Lacquer        Rare Spec Order
  • PR                Prima Vera             Raw              Rare -Early
  • RL                Rosewood               Lacquer        Brazilian species
  • RO               Rosewood               Oiled            Brazilian species
  • TL                Teak                       Lacquer        Uncommon
  • TO               Teak                       Oiled            Uncommon
  • WL               Walnut                    Lacquer        Common
  • WO              Walnut                    Oiled            Common
  • WS               Birch (stained)         Stain             Walnut on Birch
  • ZL                Zebrawood              Lacquer        Rare Spec Order
  • ZO               Zebrawood              Oiled            Rare Spec Order

 

          * "Persian Nut" and "Rambling Rose" are not an actual wood species; they were made from linear cut birch or walnut wood which was dyed with specific hues/colors, re-glued into alternating color layers and then rotary cut into the respective veneer types to achieve the effect.

          ** Lacquer finish on early production Cherry was uncommon.

 

V. HERITAGE SERIAL NUMBERS:

          1. Based upon additional information related to the use of letters starting in 1955, the 1962-1983 coding has been modified to reflect that information.

          2. The serial number was written on the paper serial tags and die stamped on the back edge of the top panel (inside top portion in LS). This practice was not used on later "MDF" cabinets for Heresy's, etc. Serial numbers can often be found written in pencil on the inside of some of the Heritage series, most notably Klipschorn's and Belle's.

          3. While the 1946-1961 manufacturing dates can only be found in the Engineering Library in Indianapolis,  accurate specific dates for the day of manufacture may also be found by close examination of the interior of the speaker cabinets. As an example there were often small inspection tags stapled inside the cabinets and penciled notations with dates inside the cabinets. An example of the production inspection stickers was the use of "PRIDE" stickers inside some models. These were used in the early through mid-1980's.

          4. Additional letters stamped in the edges of Heritage series made from birch plywood, and on the poplar and ash "lumber core" as the substrate, were "USA" and/or the cabinet builder's and final sander's initial(s). For reasons of protecting their right to privacy, I have not identified the names of those superb craftsmen (and women).

 

          DATES                   DESCRIPTION                  EXAMPLE

          1946-1947    ###                         001-020 (ending at #20)

 

  • 1946 & 1947 Klipschorn serials #002 - #013 were made by Baldwin.
  • Serial numbers #14-20 were made for purchasers in a local cabinet shop before the move to the first factory (now museum). There are no Klipschorn's with a serial number between 21 and 120.

 

          DATES                   DESCRIPTION                  EXAMPLE

          1948-1961    ####                       (starting #0121)

  • From 1948 though 1961, Klipschorn's had the serial number stamped into the tailboard, woofer access door, or inside the woofer chamber.
  • The number of Klipschorns produced and shipped in 1948 and 1949 is not clearly recorded in the early logbook.  In 1948, 24 serial numbers were recorded (#121 - #144).  Fourteen were clearly shipped in 1948, 1 was shipped in 1949, and 1 in 1950.  Eight do not have a clear record of being shipped.  In 1949, 32 serial numbers were recorded (#145 - #176).  Of these, 27 were shipped in 1949 (plus the 1948 unit), and 5 have no clear record of shipping. 

 

          DATES                   DESCRIPTION                  EXAMPLE

          1955-1983              ##letter####                     20Y1234

  • Letters that look like numbers  (e.g. I, O, Q, V) were not used. "S" is frequently misread as a "5" and Y has been confused with an X on occasion.
  • July 29, 1955 was the last day for the four digit serials (i.e. 1811). After that the "number- letter-serial" system went into effect (2 August 1955). The first "number-letter-serial" speaker was produced on the 2nd of August 1955; that serial number was 1A812.
  • In the 1955-1983 serial method the first, or prefix "digit(s)" before the year letter represents the sequence of production for each 1000 units. The suffix digits after the letter code will always be three digits - 001 through 999. For example 1C999 would be the 999th unit built, and 2C999 would be the 1999th built in 1965 C = 1965).
  • These digits before & after the year code apply only to that type of speaker.
  • The year code letter only identifies the year in which that number occurred.
  • As an example, if you have a pair of Klipschorn's and one of the serial numbers is 15T252, then by 1979 there had been 14,151 Klipschorn's made (Klipschorn's made in 1946-1947 were serial numbered from 1 to 20, and in 1948 started with #121, skipping #21 through #120).
  • For a pair of 1979 La Scala's, with serial number 22T403, it means there were 21,403 La Scala's made to that point.
  • Another example: A pair of Belles from 1979 has the serial number 3T242 and 243. This means that in 1979 these Klipsch Belles, the 2,242nd  & 2,243rd, were made.

 

          YEAR OF MANUFACTURE (1955 THROUGH 1983 ONLY)

                    A = 1955-63*           F = 1968       L = 1973       S = 1978

                    B = 1963-64*           G = 1969      M = 1974      T = 1979

                    C = 1965                H = 1970      N = 1975      U = 1980

                    D = 1966                J = 1971       P = 1976       W = 1981

                    E = 1967                 K = 1972       R = 1977      X = 1982

                                                                                Y = 1983

          * Cornwall's & La Scala's used "A" 1963 and "B" for 1964; the first Cornwall to use a letter code was 3A09, shipped in August of 1963.

 

          DATES                   DESCRIPTION                  EXAMPLE

          1984-1989    YYWW####            89261234

  • YY = year (e.g. 89 = 1989)
  • WW = week of the year (e.g. 26= last week in June)
  • The WW can also be a single digit for weeks 01 through 09; e.g. 877#### (mid February 1987)
  • In the early-mid 80's (generally starting in 1984), Klipschorn's had two serial numbers assigned to each speaker; one for the bass bin and one for the top section. The bass bin had an "L/F" at the end of the "type code" (see further below) and the top section had an "H/F" at the end of the type code.
  • This coding was is used on Chorus, Forte & Academy

 

          DATES                   DESCRIPTION                  EXAMPLE

          1990-1997    DOYY2Y1####                  135791234

  • DOY = day of the year (e.g. 135 = 14 May)
  • Y2Y1 = 2nd digit of year, 1st digit of year (e.g. 79 =1997)
  • This coding was is used on Chorus, Forte & Academy

 

          DATES                   DESCRIPTION                  EXAMPLE

          1998- 2016   YY WW ####                    00281234

  • YY = year (e.g. 00 =  2000)
  • WW = week of the year (e.g. 28 = 2nd week in June)
  • This coding was is used on Chorus, Forte & Academy

 

SEE PART 2

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Klipsch Heritage "Codes" Part -2

_____________________________________________________________________________________

VI. HERITAGE DRIVER CODES:

          1. Driver Manufacturing Date Codes: Example: 9429 = 1994, 29th week of the year (1994).

          2. This numbering system is derived from the Electronics Industry Association (EIA) coding. The EIA did not issue Klipsch with an EIA prefix.

          3. For further information on the EIA system, see:

                    http://www.provide.net/~cfh/pots.html

                    Note: This site has additional manufacturers (including non-Klipsch components and an excellent resource for dating non-Klipsch equipment by the EIA "manufacturer & date-code" system.

            4. Klipsch Driver Manufacturer Codes:

                    Example: K-33-E would be the "Klipsch", part type 33 (15") woofer from Eminence. The suffix letter code generally referred to the Klipsch assigned origin/ manufacturer of the driver.

 

  • B = CTS (Chicago Telephone Supply), Brownsville TX
  • P = CTS in Paducah KY (woofers only)
  • R = Rola (an additional "R" either stamped or handwritten also indicated replacement (often seen on K22's and K- 24's)
  • D = K-77-D; From 2006 to the present. Essentially a K-77-F (see below) with an integral recessed mounting flange. Permits flush mounting of the tweeter from the rear, per the “Z” brackets for pre Feb 1983 Klipschorns (KH Update kit: part # 1006969)
  • F = Philippines supplier that purchased the EV tooling (e.g. K-77-F)
  • EV = Electro Voice (early K-33's e.g. "EV-15WK", also EV 1828 was used as the K-56 for Cornwall in 1974)
  • G = Atlas (for K-55-G for Cornwall 1981-1983)
  • J = Jensen (Also used for University drivers in mid- 1950s; e.g. K-5-J - University model 5A HF, and SAHF)
  • H = Heppner (K-52-H in Cornwall-II’s)
  • K = Klipsch (Pyle - Klipsch purchased Pyle.  Drivers formerly assembled in Hope, Arkansas and subsequently in Hot Springs, Arkansas were then moved to Pyle in Huntington, Indiana)
  • E = Eminence (Primarily woofers)
  • V = Atlas (see also notes below)
  • M = Electro Voice (also for the Eminence K-33-M in 1967)
  • X = Atlas (e.g. K-55-X)
  • Ti = Titanium series (new design with titanium diaphragms)

 

          5. The V on the midrange & tweeters can also indicate 'video shielded'

          6. A significant  number of "replacement" drivers, e.g. late model K-53's, K-76's will have no manufacturing code or date code, e.g. "blank" as in nothing at all.

          7. On Heresy drivers, the number K53 indicates the driver/horn combo part number, which is a K52 driver and K701 horn.

          8. Electro Voice also produced the "round magnet" T-35 tweeter, but later versions were simply labeled K-77.  The first shipment of Electrovoice T-35 tweeters designated as the K-77 were received on 26 August 1959. The K-77 is first used in a Klipschorn with the serial number 1445 on 15 October, 1959.

          9. Electro Voice also produced a K-56 (EV-1828) as a temporary replacement for K-55's in 1974. Found on Cornwall's, La Scala’s, and Belle's produced in that year.

          10. Atlas produced the K-55X's (PD-5VH); and the PD-5VH is the K-55V (still available from Atlas and other vendors)

          11. Stephens (P52LX2) woofers were used from 1949 through 1953 on the Klipschorn's. In 1953, the Stephens P103LX2 was used. In 1954 University mid/and high drivers were also used.

          12. From 1950 through 1961, the Stephens woofers were used interchangeably with the Electro Voice EV-15WK woofer and the early Jensen K-33-J's in the Klipschorn's.

          13. These codes also apply to drivers used in Chorus & Forte’s

 

VII. HERITAGE DRIVER TYPES BY APPLICATION (PREFIX IDENTIFIER ONLY - SEE SECTION VI FOR SUFFIX CODES):

1. Tweeter types:

  • K-75 Forte-I, Forte-II
  • K-76 Heresy-II
  • K-77 Heresy-I, Cornwall-I, Belle, La Scala, Klipschorn
  • K-79 Cornwall-II, Chorus-I
  • K-107 Heresy-III, Cornwall-III

 

2. Midrange types:

  • K-51 Cornwall-I (CW 1.5;a hybrid of the Cornwall-I and the Cornwall-II)
  • K-52 Cornwall-I (CW 1.5;a hybrid of the Cornwall-I and the Cornwall-II)
  • K-53 Forte-I, Heresy-I (late models), Heresy-II
  • K-53 Ti – Heresy-III, Cornwall-III
  • K-55 Klipschorn, La Scala, Belle, Cornwall, Heresy-I
  • K-56 Cornwall-I,  La Scala and Belle (1974 only)
  • K-57 Cornwall-II, Chorus-I
  • K-61 Forte-II, Chorus-II

 

          3. Woofer types:

  • K-22 (types E, EF, K, and R) Heresy-I
  • K-23 Forte-I
  • K-24 Heresy-I (late models), Heresy-II
  • K-25 Forte-II
  • K-28 Heresy-III
  • K-33 Klipschorn, Belle, La Scala, Cornwall-I, Cornwall-III
  • K-34 Cornwall-II
  • K-48 Chorus-I, Chorus-II

 

          3. Crossover types (Heritage only, there are others pre-1964):

  • A - Klipschorn, Belle, La Scala
  • B - Cornwall
  • C - Early Heresy
  • E - Heresy (E2 for 1983-1984 Heresy-Is with K-24 & K53/701's)
  • AA - Klipschorn, Belle, (and early to late 70's La Scala)
  • AB - Belle
  • AL - La Scala
  • AK- Klipschorn (latest is AK-5)
  • K series (K1000 early Cornwall's, K500/K5000 early Klipschorn's)
  • 1RC - La Scala & Klipschorn (later re-designated Type-A in October 1966)

         

4. Autotransformer types and values:

  • T2A(3110A)   -3, -6, -9, -12db
  • T3A(3465-M)  -6db
  • T4A(3485)  -4db
  • T5A(3496)  -6db
  • T7A(3504)  -10db
  • T8A(3507)  -8db
  • T9A(3540)  -3db
  • T10A(3542)  -9db
  • T11A  -12db

 

          5. Horn Types

  • K-5 (early Klipschorn)
  • K-400/401 – Klipschorn
  • "01" variant is "plastic" or expanded foam composite version
  • K-500 - Belle and early Klipschorn's (until 1955)
  • K-600/601 – Cornwall, Cornwall-II
  • K-700/701 – Heresy (all models), Cornwall-III
  • K-76 (Tweeter Horn) - Heresy II, Forte-I, early Cornwall-II (1.5)
  • K-79 Tractrix Horn - Heresy-III, Cornwall-III
  • K-1000 Heresy type "H", Cornwall-I (early models)

 

VIII. KLIPSCH GRILLS & CLOTH CODES:

  • #03 = Cane
  • #13 = Heritage brown
  • #15 = White/black coarse weave
  • #17 = Duracrest, black, poly-olefin, stranded, coarse weave (Heritage only)
  • #18 = Duracrest, brown, poly-olefin, stranded, coarse weave (Heritage only)
  • #19 = Duracrest #19, black, poly/ nylon, flat weave (Forte, Chorus, etc.)

 

          1. Early model Cornwall, all Belle and standard Klipschorn grilles are cloth wrapped around the motor board and stapled to the back side of the motor board.

          2. Cornwall Decorator series were later given various grille fittings. The first was a standard sized grille with Velcro tabs that would simply be surface mounted. In later years a trim kit with a grille was developed.

          3. Heritage grill frames for the Cornwall, La Scala, and Heresy were made from (a) "Masonite" fiberboard, or (B) a resin impregnated board (late model Cornwall & Heresy). The frames for the Klipschorn & Belle bass bins are 3/8" or ½" plywood, with a 'cut out' frame, with the cloth glued and stapled.

          4.  Klipschorn side grills are retained with an "L" bracket, studs on the LF section lower panel and wing nuts. In 2005, the angle brackets, hanger bolts and wing nuts used to attach the HF and LF cabinets together on the Klipschorns were replaced with thick rubber spacers, on the LF cabinet, indexed into recesses on the HF cabinet.

          5. Later models (Forte, Chorus, etc.) grill frames are also made from polystyrene plastic, with cloth glued to reverse edges. These models, and KLF's, earlier Reference series, etc have the grills attached by means of plastic "pins" molded to the grill frame and inserts on the motor board.

          6. The new Reference series and all new Heritage series grills (except Klipschorn's) are retained by magnets. 60th Anniversary Klipschorns are also retained by magnets.

          7. Grill "Velcro" varies between either 3/4" round or ½" x 3/4" rectangles. On Cornwall's (and seen on several Heresy's), the "motor board" Velcro pieces are sometimes stapled to the motor board.

 

IX. KLIPSCH LOGO DESIGNS

** Does not include Professional or Cinema

            1. After the very early “cut into the veneer” logos, there were four basic designs:

                    (a) "Pie slice" in black/silver, clear/copper, clear/white (early pies), and copper/black: Sizes and fonts vary slightly as manufacturer/ contractors changed. The most recent (current for the Heritage series) is the copper/black pie slice, sometimes referred to as the small "Jubilee" pie.

                    (B) Copper with PWK logo and black lettering: This design varied slightly with the font & etching varying in distance and size.

                    © Copper/bronze with subdued lettering, and no "PWK" emblem on a background of horizontal stripes: These were generally seen in the mid-70s.

                    (d) In early production years, there was a clear plastic strip with "Klipschorn", and also "Rebel" in white script lettering.

          2. There are also several sizes of copper colored plastic with a raised Klipsch logo on black background used on KG series. The Synergy and Reference series used a black oval logo with raised Klipsch and 'V' of a variety of sizes. This type of logo was a painted Copper electroformed shell on a plastic base with various attachment methods.

          3. In addition, the 'A' line (epic) had a wide 'V' on the bottom with centered Klipsch and small PWK logo in copper or gold color (e.g. Epic series).

          4. The Heritage logos were/are secured to the grills, centered usually within ½" to 3/4" from the top edge of the grill with types b & c, and either on the upper left or upper right for type a (pie slices). The glue used is contact cement. The "d" type for the Klipschorn on the type "B" (collared), was held on the collar with two small pin nails. Current Heritage “pie slice” logos are secured with PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive)

 

 

X. HERITAGE PRODUCTION NOTES & TIME LINES:

1. HERESY:

  • 1957: The Heresy is introduced as a center channel for the Klipschorn. It is the first Klipsch speaker that does not require corner placement. This model utilized the K-1000 midrange horn. These are rare, and one example in the Museum in Hope is the rarest of all the Klipsch Heritage speakers.
  • 1957 - 1959: Both 8" and 12" woofer versions were produced during this period.
  • 1967 - The H-700 is introduced in the now familiar format using a 12" K-22 woofer (There were several variants used E, EF, K) K-700 horn; K-55-V mid-range and the K-77 (T-35 type Alnico magnet) tweeter.
  • From this date through the end of the model run in 1985, various networks were used: Type C, Type E and Type E-2. All were variations on the same design.
  • 1972-1973: The Heresy's name is changed from H-700 to Heresy.
  • 1983-1984: The K-24 woofer is substituted for the K-22, and during the last production of the Heresy-I, the midrange K-53/701 is substituted for the K-55/700.
  • 1985: The Heresy II is introduced using a mid-range and tweeter driver set that, for the first time since the introduction of the H-700 differed from that of the Klipschorn. Component designations were: Woofer K-24-K, Midrange K-701 horn and K-52 driver (the mid range assembly was also stamped K-53 on the driver). The tweeter is K-75-K horn and K-76 driver. This was the first Heresy model to discontinue the use the traditional alpha numeric network designations (Type E-2). All of the drivers in the Heresy II were front mounted to reduce the diffraction effects caused by rear mounting and firing through the motor board.
  • May 2001: Finish, grill and riser variant options are reduced from nearly 100 to 10.
  • Sept 29, 2005: The Heresy III is introduced featuring increased sensitivity (3dB), Titanium mid-range and tweeter diaphragms, Tractrix tweeter horn and bi-wire inputs. Component designations are: Woofer K-28-E, Midrange K-53-Ti (K-701 horn and K-53-Ti driver), Tweeter K-107-Ti (K-79-T horn and K-100-Ti driver). Finish, grille and riser variations are further reduced from 10 to 3.
  • May 2006: The Heresy III midrange compression driver is sourced to a new supplier and the network is revised to compensate for the change.
  • 2008+: There have been a number of improvements produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information.

 

2. CORNWALL:

  • Oct 1959: The Cornwall is introduced as the world's second commercially produced center speaker. A speaker with higher output capability than the Heresy was needed when used in three speaker arrays between Klipschorn’s. Component designations: Woofer EV 15WK, Midrange K-1000 Horn and University SAHF Driver, Tweeter K-77
  • Late 1959: Transition to the K-33-J Woofer (Jensen)
  • 1959 - 1961: Sporadic transition to the K-55-V mid-range driver (Atlas)
  • Jan 1963: The K-1000 diffraction type midrange horn was replaced with the exponential K-600 horn with a lower (600 Hz) cutoff.
  • Sept 1967: Transition to the K-33-M. The records are not clear as to the origin of this driver but it is believed to be an Eminence driver with an Alnico magnet.
  • Jan 1968: Transition to The K-33-P Woofer (CTS Paducah KY)
  • 1974: The horizontal version of the Cornwall is discontinued
  • 1974: K-56 mid-range driver (Electrovoice 1828) is used for a short period as a temporary replacement as the supply of K-55-V drivers was interrupted.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975-1979: K-33-E and the K-33-B were used interchangeably.
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively
  • June 1981: The updated B2 network, with steeper crossover slopes is phased in with no changes to the K-33-E, K-55-V and K-77-M drivers.
  • Oct 1981 - March 1983: The transition between four different iterations of the midrange driver from revolving sources occurs during this period. The original K-55-V was changed to a K-51-V (10/19/81) This marked the first time in the Cornwall's history that it used a driver set that differed from that of the Klipschorn. The K-51-V was then changed to the K-55-G (essentially a ceramic magnet version of the Atlas Alnico K-55-V). The K-55-G was then changed to the Hepner built K-52-H and finally the Klipsch built K-52-K.
  • Mar 1983: The B-3 network and the K-52 midrange driver starts to be used in this model.  Component designations were: Woofer Eminence K-33-E, Midrange K-57-K (K-600 Aluminum horn and K-52-K driver with the threaded snout), Tweeter K-77-M and B-3 network.
  • Jan 1986: The Cornwall II is introduced featuring front mounted drivers to reduce baffle induced diffraction effects. Component designations were: Woofer Eminence K-34-E (K-33-E with a dressy pad ring), Midrange K-57-K (K-601 plastic horn and K-52-K driver), Tweeter K-79-K (K-75-K horn and K-79 driver) and CW II network.
  • 1990: The Cornwall II is discontinued
  • Mar 2006: The Cornwall III is introduced marking the end of the Cornwall's 15 year absence from the market. This version utilizes the Klipschorn woofer, the horn and driver set from the Heresy III (featuring Titanium diaphragms and a Tractrix® tweeter horn) and bi-wire inputs. Component designations are: Woofer K-33-E, Midrange K-53-Ti (K-701 horn and K-53-Ti driver), Tweeter K-107-Ti (K-79-T horn and K-100-Ti driver).
  • 2008+: There have been a number of newer models produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information.

 

3. LASCALA:

  • 1963: The La Scala is designed as a portable version of the Klipschorn to be used as a P.A. system for Winthrop Rockefeller's Arkansas gubernatorial campaign. Component designations were: Woofer K-33-J (Jensen), Midrange K-400 horn and K-55-V driver (Atlas), Tweeter K-77 (Electrovoice).
  • 1966: The designation for the Type 1RC crossover network was changed to Type A. 
  • Sept 1967: Transition to the K-33-M. The records are not clear as to the origin of this driver but it is believed to be an Eminence driver with an Alnico magnet.
  • Jan 1968: Transition to The K-33-P Woofer (CTS Paducah KY)
  • 1971: The Type AA crossover network was introduced featuring Sneer diode tweeter protection.
  • 1974: K-56 mid-range driver (Electrovoice 1828) is used for a short period as a temporary replacement as the supply of K-55-V drivers was interrupted.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975? - 1979: K-33-E (Eminence) and the K-33-B were used interchangeably.
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively.
  • 1983: The Type AL crossover network was introduced incorporating steeper filter slopes for enhanced tweeter protection and smoother response in the crossover regions.
  • 1983: The Type AL-2 network was introduced to accommodate the new K-55-M mid-range driver. This Electrovoice sourced driver was essentially the same as the previous K-55-V with a smoother response.
  • 1987: The aluminum K-400 horn was replaced with the K-401 structural foam horn resulting in slightly improved distortion figures.
  • 1989: The AL-3 network was introduced to correct for a shift in the output of the K-55-M mid-range driver.
  • 2000: Electrovoice ceases production of the K-77-M and K-55-M tweeter and mid-range drivers. The search for replacement drivers and the acquisition of the EV tooling is sought. Very limited production of a few pairs occurs at the end of 2000 and the early months of 2001 using existing part stocks
  • May 2001: The Atlas PD-5VH (Current version of the previous K-55-V) is modified slightly and christened the K-55-X. The various components of the K-77-M tweeter are either retooled or sourced from the new owners of the tooling and assembled by a third party. This variant of the tweeter is designated the K-77-F. An entirely new network (AL-4) was created to accommodate these driver changes. Fusing is eliminated in favor of a polyswitch for tweeter protection. The tweeter on the La Scala was flush mounted for the first time using "Z" brackets. A metal input panel with binding posts in a bi-wire configuration replaced the traditional screw type barrier block.
  • Dec 2005: The La Scala II debuted as the first "finished" version of this model featuring a two piece veneered cabinet utilizing 1" MDF instead of the traditional 3/4" plywood. The AL-5 network was introduced to compensate for the improvement in low frequency response resulting from the change in cabinet construction. The HF and LF cabinets stacked together using thick rubber isolating spacers. Finish variants were  reduced from 6 to 3.
  • April 2006: The horn portion of the K-77-F tweeter was re-tooled to include a recessed flange eliminating the need for the separate "Z" bracket and attachment rivets, the new designation is the K-77-D. This also allowed the updating of pre-Z bracket La Scala’s (prior to May 2001) to flush tweeter status without motor board modification.
  • 2008+: There have been a number of new versions produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information.

 

4. BELLE KLIPSCH:

  • 1971: Belle Klipsch was introduced as a more elegant or finished version of the La Scala. Component designations were: Woofer K-33-P (CTS, Paducah KY), Midrange K-500 horn and K-55-V driver (Atlas), Tweeter K-77 (Electrovoice).
  • July 1971: The Type AA crossover network was introduced featuring Zener diode tweeter protection.
  • 1974: K-56 mid-range driver (Electrovoice 1828) is used for a short period as a temporary replacement as the supply of K-55-V drivers was interrupted.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975? - 1979: K-33-E (Eminence) and the K-33-B were used interchangeably.
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively
  • Feb 1983: The Type-AB crossover network was introduced incorporating steeper filter slopes for enhanced tweeter protection and smoother response in the crossover regions.
  • Oct 1983: The Type AB-2 network was introduced to accommodate the new K-55-M mid-range driver. This Electrovoice sourced driver was essentially the same as the previous K-55-V with a smoother response.
  • 2000: Electrovoice ceases production of the K-77-M and K-55-M tweeter and mid-range drivers. The search for replacement drivers and the acquisition of the EV tooling is sought. Very limited production of a few pairs occurs at the end of 2000 and the early months of 2001 using existing part stocks
  • May 2001: The Atlas PD-5VH (Current version of the previous K-55-V) is modified slightly and christened the K-55-X. The various components of the K-77-M tweeter are either retooled or sourced from the new owners of the tooling and assembled by a third party. This variant of the tweeter is designated the K-77-F. An entirely new network (AB-3) was created to accommodate these driver changes. Fusing is eliminated in favor of a polyswitch for tweeter protection. A metal input panel with binding posts in a bi-wire configuration replaced the traditional screw type barrier block.
  • Late 2005 - Early 2006: The Belle Klipsch is phased out of production as parts are used up.

 

6. KLIPSCHORN:

  • 1930: While working In Chile, S.A. PWK was an amateur radio enthusiast. Comparing various types of radio speakers, he recognized the superior efficiency of horns.
  • 1933: Back in the U.S. at Stanford University, PWK made note of a classmates comment that "speakers sound better in a corner".
  • 1934: Still at Stanford, PWK read the Symposium on Auditory Perspective by Bell Telephone Laboratories.
  • 1939-41: The above mentioned facts were blended into a design philosophy. PWK drew pictures and built paper models that were to become the "Klipschorn".
  • Feb 1940: Paul Klipsch applies for a patent on his first prototype cornerhorn, the X-1.  It was during patent "negotiations" that he first learned of prior art cornerhorns. There were several such designs.
  • 1941: While stationed at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds, PWK reviewed and corrected his first manuscript on corner horns. Note: A second design was prototyped as X-2, but was destroyed by termites before meaningful measurements could be made.
  • May 1942: The first successful prototype (X-3) was built in Paul Klipsch's garage using only hand tools. This basic corner woofer has changed little over the years. This was serial number 1.
  • Oct 1942: Paul Klipsch applied for a patent on X3.
  • Feb 1943: Paul received a patent on his first (unsuccessful) prototype, the X-1.
  • April 1945: A patent was granted for the third prototype (X3) which was to become the Klipschorn.
  • June 1945: Another patent was applied for describing Paul's second high frequency horn (X-5). This later became the K-5-H horn.
  • 1946: Klipsch and Associates was incorporated.
  • Early 1947: The first production run of 12 units, serial numbers 2-13 were built to Paul's specifications by the Baldwin Piano & Organ Company of Cincinnati Ohio.  The high frequency driver in these was the WE713A.  At least one of the woofers was a JBL.
  • Late 1947 - Early 1948: Seven more serial numbers 14-20 were built by hand in a local cabinet shop. Paul Klipsch recalled that no more than two were alike. It was during these "experiments" that the LF horn's "sinus" cavities were added to the woofer's back air chamber to maximize acoustic capacitance. Component Designations: High frequency Western Electric 713A, Woofer unknown.
  • June 1948: The first Klipschorn to be built in the first actual Klipsch factory was S/N 121. The building was formerly the telephone exchange building for the Southwest Proving Grounds and is currently the Klipsch Museum of Audio History. Component Designations: The early production logs (1949) first make reference to the use of the Jensen P-15-LL woofer. The production log makes reference to a total of 26 Klipschorn’s built this year.
  • 1949: The Stephens P52LX2 becomes the primary woofer. This driver is used through August of 1953 when the transition to the Stephens 103LX2 was made. The Stephens P15 High frequency driver starts appearing in the logbook. 
  • Aug 1950: The Electrovoice EV 15WK woofer is first referenced in the production logs and is used interchangeably with both of the Stephens woofers and the early K-33-J woofers until March of 1961
  • 1951: The University SAHF replaces the Stephens P15 as the primary high frequency driver.
  • June 1951: The first three-way Klipschorn incorporated a Jensen RP203 tweeter. This tweeter came from the famous Jensen G-610 Triaxial 15" driver and required considerable negotiations with Jensen. It was not until mid-1952 that all Klipschorn’s were three-way. A two-way Klipschorn with response to 12Khz was generally adequate for program material up to that time. The University MID-T-4401 replaced the Jensen unit as the tweeter of choice later in 1951.
  • July 1952: The original K-5-H high frequency horn of the patent was modified to become the K-5-J. This involved changing the vertical taper so that the dividers ("boats") could be removed. This resulted in a production cost savings, not an acoustical improvement.
  • Sept 1952: A cardboard shipping container was used for the first time. Prior to this all Klipschorn’s® were shipped in wooden crates. The last wood crate was used on S/N 912 on June 13, 1955
  • Aug 1953: The Stephens 103LX2 Woofer starts to be used
  • 1955: K-500 / 5000 network phased out in favor of the 1 RC (Type A network)
  • Nov 1957 - May 5, 1958: This was the transition period between the University 4401 tweeter and the Electrovoice Alnico magnet T-35 (K-77) which yielded substantially flat response to 17Khz
  • Aug 1959: The first shipment of Electrovoice T-35 tweeters designated as K-77 is received. The K-77 is first used in S/N 1445 on Oct 15,1959
  • Nov 1958: Driver polarities were first observed and made consistent. This practice was initiated due to marginal improvements noted during listening tests.
  • Apr 1960: Transition to the K-33-J Woofer (Jensen) from the EV 15WK began. And University SAHF mid-range drivers started to be designated and labeled as K-55
  • May - Sept 1961: This was the transition period between the 6" high woofer horn throat and the current 3" high throat. This boosted output in the 400 - 500 Hz range further smoothing the response. Multi-tapered wedges were also added to the woofer throat (opposite side of the motor board from the driver) to further improve the response in this region. The use of these wedges was soon abandoned but the smaller throat dimensions were retained and are in use today.
  • Nov 1961: The Atlas K-55-V Alnico magnet mid-range driver is introduced. This driver was patterned after the famous Western Electric 555-W.
  • 1963 - May 1964: The K-5-J mid-range horn was replaced with the K-400 resulting in a flatter overall spectral balance, particularly in both crossover regions.
  • Oct. 24, 1966: The designation for the Type 1RC crossover network was changed to Type A. 
  • Sept 1967: Transition to the K-33-M.
  • Jan 1968: Transition to The K-33-P Woofer (CTS Paducah KY)
  • July 1971: The Type AA crossover network was introduced featuring Zener diode tweeter protection.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975-1979: K-33-E (Eminence) and the K-33-B were used interchangeably. The records are not specific about the actual start date for the K-33-E but it is believed to be in the early to mid 1970's
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively
  • Feb 1, 1983: The two piece Type-AK crossover network was introduced incorporating fusing and steeper filter slopes for enhanced tweeter protection and smoother response in the crossover regions. Heavy gauge (10 AWG) internal wiring was used throughout and binding posts replaced the traditional screw type barrier block as input terminals. The tweeter was flush mounted in the baffle using "Z" brackets. Rubber wall gaskets were added to the sides of the tailboard to improve the seal to less than perfect wall surfaces.
  • Oct 1983: The Type AK-2 network was introduced to accommodate the new Ceramic Magnet K-55-M mid-range driver. This Electrovoice sourced driver was essentially the same as the previous K-55-V with a ceramic magnet and a smoother response
  • Apr 1987: The "D" style decorator cabinet (no cosmetic panels or grilles) was discontinued.
  • Nov 1987: The Aluminum K-400 horn was replaced with the K-401 structural foam horn resulting in slightly improved distortion figures.
  • Oct 1989: The AK-3 network was introduced to correct for a shift in the output of the K-55-M mid-range driver.
  • 1995: A limited edition of the Klipschorn is produced to mark the 50th anniversary of the company and the Klipschorn. A total of 150 pairs were offered in three different finishes but less than 50 pairs total were sold. The only changes to this model were cosmetic.
  • Aug 1995: The "C" style cabinet (no intermediate collar or kick plate) was discontinued
  • 2000: Electrovoice ceases production of the K-77-M and K-55-M tweeter and mid-range drivers. The search for replacement drivers and the acquisition of the EV tooling is sought. Very limited production of a few pairs occurs at the end of 2000 and the early months of 2001 using existing part stocks
  • May 2001: The Atlas PD-5VH (Current version of the previous K-55-V) is modified slightly and christened the K-55-X. The various components of the K-77-M tweeter are either retooled or sourced from the new owners of the tooling and assembled by a third party. This variant of the tweeter is designated the K-77-F. An entirely new one piece network, located on the woofer door, (AK-4) was created to accommodate these driver changes. Fusing is eliminated in favor of a Polyswitch for tweeter protection and a trap circuit was added to tame the longstanding response peak in the middle of the woofer's pass band, resulting in an improved spectral balance. The number of variants available was reduced by the elimination of the Brown and Cane grille cloths and oil finishes.
  • Dec 2005: The Type AK-5 network was introduced to compensate for the improvement in low frequency response resulting from the addition of a horizontal wall seal to the top of the low frequency cabinet. The style "B" cabinet was discontinued by the elimination of the inset "intermediate collar" and visible "woofer top" panel in favor of a 3/8" gap between the cabinets. The long standing angle brackets, hanger bolts and wing nuts used to attach the HF and LF cabinets together were replaced with thick rubber spacers, on the LF cabinet, indexed into recesses on the HF cabinet.
  • April 2006: The horn portion of the K-77-F tweeter was re-tooled to include a recessed flange eliminating the need for the separate "Z" bracket and attachment rivets. This also allowed the updating of pre-Z bracket Klipschorn’s (prior to Feb 1,1983) to flush tweeter status without motor board modification. This variant was designated as the K-77-D
  • April 2006: A special limited edition Klipschorn was produced to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the company and the speaker itself. Low frequency response was enhanced with the addition of rear low frequency horn panels. This eliminated the need for a tight fit into the corner and permitted toe-in and toe-out flexibility for the first time. Additional upgrades were made to the binding posts, internal wiring, and network component specifications. Aesthetic enhancements included a Lacewood veneer finish on the LF cabinet and a high gloss Black finish on the HF cabinet. The traditional wood kick plate was replaced with a machined and anodized Aluminum version containing a Silver finish PWK logo containing a real diamond. The rear of the HF cabinet was totally enclosed with finished panels featuring display windows for a commemorative numbered plaque and the HF network. 200 pairs were produced

2008+: There have been a number of “special editions” produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information

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VI. HERITAGE DRIVER CODES:

          1. Driver Manufacturing Date Codes: Example: 9429 = 1994, 29th week of the year (1994).

          2. This numbering system is derived from the Electronics Industry Association (EIA) coding. The EIA did not issue Klipsch with an EIA prefix.

          3. For further information on the EIA system, see:

                    http://www.provide.net/~cfh/pots.html

                    Note: This site has additional manufacturers (including non-Klipsch components and an excellent resource for dating non-Klipsch equipment by the EIA "manufacturer & date-code" system.

            4. Klipsch Driver Manufacturer Codes:

                    Example: K-33-E would be the "Klipsch", part type 33 (15") woofer from Eminence. The suffix letter code generally referred to the Klipsch assigned origin/ manufacturer of the driver.

 

  • B = CTS (Chicago Telephone Supply), Brownsville TX
  • P = CTS in Paducah KY (woofers only)
  • R = Rola (an additional "R" either stamped or handwritten also indicated replacement (often seen on K22's and K- 24's)
  • D = K-77-D; From 2006 to the present. Essentially a K-77-F (see below) with an integral recessed mounting flange. Permits flush mounting of the tweeter from the rear, per the “Z” brackets for pre Feb 1983 Klipschorns (KH Update kit: part # 1006969)
  • F = Philippines supplier that purchased the EV tooling (e.g. K-77-F)
  • EV = Electro Voice (early K-33's e.g. "EV-15WK", also EV 1828 was used as the K-56 for Cornwall in 1974)
  • G = Atlas (for K-55-G for Cornwall 1981-1983)
  • J = Jensen (Also used for University drivers in mid- 1950s; e.g. K-5-J - University model 5A HF, and SAHF)
  • H = Heppner (K-52-H in Cornwall-II’s)
  • K = Klipsch (Pyle - Klipsch purchased Pyle.  Drivers formerly assembled in Hope, Arkansas and subsequently in Hot Springs, Arkansas were then moved to Pyle in Huntington, Indiana)
  • E = Eminence (Primarily woofers)
  • V = Atlas (see also notes below)
  • M = Electro Voice (also for the Eminence K-33-M in 1967)
  • X = Atlas (e.g. K-55-X)
  • Ti = Titanium series (new design with titanium diaphragms)

 

          5. The V on the midrange & tweeters can also indicate 'video shielded'

          6. A significant  number of "replacement" drivers, e.g. late model K-53's, K-76's will have no manufacturing code or date code, e.g. "blank" as in nothing at all.

          7. On Heresy drivers, the number K53 indicates the driver/horn combo part number, which is a K52 driver and K701 horn.

          8. Electro Voice also produced the "round magnet" T-35 tweeter, but later versions were simply labeled K-77.  The first shipment of Electrovoice T-35 tweeters designated as the K-77 were received on 26 August 1959. The K-77 is first used in a Klipschorn with the serial number 1445 on 15 October, 1959.

          9. Electro Voice also produced a K-56 (EV-1828) as a temporary replacement for K-55's in 1974. Found on Cornwall's, La Scala’s, and Belle's produced in that year.

          10. Atlas produced the K-55X's (PD-5VH); and the PD-5VH is the K-55V (still available from Atlas and other vendors)

          11. Stephens (P52LX2) woofers were used from 1949 through 1953 on the Klipschorn's. In 1953, the Stephens P103LX2 was used. In 1954 University mid/and high drivers were also used.

          12. From 1950 through 1961, the Stephens woofers were used interchangeably with the Electro Voice EV-15WK woofer and the early Jensen K-33-J's in the Klipschorn's.

          13. These codes also apply to drivers used in Chorus & Forte’s

 

VII. HERITAGE DRIVER TYPES BY APPLICATION (PREFIX IDENTIFIER ONLY - SEE SECTION VI FOR SUFFIX CODES):

1. Tweeter types:

  • K-75 Forte-I, Forte-II
  • K-76 Heresy-II
  • K-77 Heresy-I, Cornwall-I, Belle, La Scala, Klipschorn
  • K-79 Cornwall-II, Chorus-I
  • K-107 Heresy-III, Cornwall-III

 

2. Midrange types:

  • K-51 Cornwall-I (CW 1.5;a hybrid of the Cornwall-I and the Cornwall-II)
  • K-52 Cornwall-I (CW 1.5;a hybrid of the Cornwall-I and the Cornwall-II)
  • K-53 Forte-I, Heresy-I (late models), Heresy-II
  • K-53 Ti – Heresy-III, Cornwall-III
  • K-55 Klipschorn, La Scala, Belle, Cornwall, Heresy-I
  • K-56 Cornwall-I,  La Scala and Belle (1974 only)
  • K-57 Cornwall-II, Chorus-I
  • K-61 Forte-II, Chorus-II

 

          3. Woofer types:

  • K-22 (types E, EF, K, and R) Heresy-I
  • K-23 Forte-I
  • K-24 Heresy-I (late models), Heresy-II
  • K-25 Forte-II
  • K-28 Heresy-III
  • K-33 Klipschorn, Belle, La Scala, Cornwall-I, Cornwall-III
  • K-34 Cornwall-II
  • K-48 Chorus-I, Chorus-II

 

          3. Crossover types (Heritage only, there are others pre-1964):

  • A - Klipschorn, Belle, La Scala
  • B - Cornwall
  • C - Early Heresy
  • E - Heresy (E2 for 1983-1984 Heresy-Is with K-24 & K53/701's)
  • AA - Klipschorn, Belle, (and early to late 70's La Scala)
  • AB - Belle
  • AL - La Scala
  • AK- Klipschorn (latest is AK-5)
  • K series (K1000 early Cornwall's, K500/K5000 early Klipschorn's)
  • 1RC - La Scala & Klipschorn (later re-designated Type-A in October 1966)

         

4. Autotransformer types and values:

  • T2A(3110A)   -3, -6, -9, -12db
  • T3A(3465-M)  -6db
  • T4A(3485)  -4db
  • T5A(3496)  -6db
  • T7A(3504)  -10db
  • T8A(3507)  -8db
  • T9A(3540)  -3db
  • T10A(3542)  -9db
  • T11A  -12db

 

          5. Horn Types

  • K-5 (early Klipschorn)
  • K-400/401 – Klipschorn
  • "01" variant is "plastic" or expanded foam composite version
  • K-500 - Belle and early Klipschorn's (until 1955)
  • K-600/601 – Cornwall, Cornwall-II
  • K-700/701 – Heresy (all models), Cornwall-III
  • K-76 (Tweeter Horn) - Heresy II, Forte-I, early Cornwall-II (1.5)
  • K-79 Tractrix Horn - Heresy-III, Cornwall-III
  • K-1000 Heresy type "H", Cornwall-I (early models)

 

VIII. KLIPSCH GRILLS & CLOTH CODES:

  • #03 = Cane
  • #13 = Heritage brown
  • #15 = White/black coarse weave
  • #17 = Duracrest, black, poly-olefin, stranded, coarse weave (Heritage only)
  • #18 = Duracrest, brown, poly-olefin, stranded, coarse weave (Heritage only)
  • #19 = Duracrest #19, black, poly/ nylon, flat weave (Forte, Chorus, etc.)

 

          1. Early model Cornwall, all Belle and standard Klipschorn grilles are cloth wrapped around the motor board and stapled to the back side of the motor board.

          2. Cornwall Decorator series were later given various grille fittings. The first was a standard sized grille with Velcro tabs that would simply be surface mounted. In later years a trim kit with a grille was developed.

          3. Heritage grill frames for the Cornwall, La Scala, and Heresy were made from (a) "Masonite" fiberboard, or (B) a resin impregnated board (late model Cornwall & Heresy). The frames for the Klipschorn & Belle bass bins are 3/8" or ½" plywood, with a 'cut out' frame, with the cloth glued and stapled.

          4.  Klipschorn side grills are retained with an "L" bracket, studs on the LF section lower panel and wing nuts. In 2005, the angle brackets, hanger bolts and wing nuts used to attach the HF and LF cabinets together on the Klipschorns were replaced with thick rubber spacers, on the LF cabinet, indexed into recesses on the HF cabinet.

          5. Later models (Forte, Chorus, etc.) grill frames are also made from polystyrene plastic, with cloth glued to reverse edges. These models, and KLF's, earlier Reference series, etc have the grills attached by means of plastic "pins" molded to the grill frame and inserts on the motor board.

          6. The new Reference series and all new Heritage series grills (except Klipschorn's) are retained by magnets. 60th Anniversary Klipschorns are also retained by magnets.

          7. Grill "Velcro" varies between either 3/4" round or ½" x 3/4" rectangles. On Cornwall's (and seen on several Heresy's), the "motor board" Velcro pieces are sometimes stapled to the motor board.

 

IX. KLIPSCH LOGO DESIGNS

** Does not include Professional or Cinema

            1. After the very early “cut into the veneer” logos, there were four basic designs:

                    (a) "Pie slice" in black/silver, clear/copper, clear/white (early pies), and copper/black: Sizes and fonts vary slightly as manufacturer/ contractors changed. The most recent (current for the Heritage series) is the copper/black pie slice, sometimes referred to as the small "Jubilee" pie.

                    (B) Copper with PWK logo and black lettering: This design varied slightly with the font & etching varying in distance and size.

                    © Copper/bronze with subdued lettering, and no "PWK" emblem on a background of horizontal stripes: These were generally seen in the mid-70s.

                    (d) In early production years, there was a clear plastic strip with "Klipschorn", and also "Rebel" in white script lettering.

          2. There are also several sizes of copper colored plastic with a raised Klipsch logo on black background used on KG series. The Synergy and Reference series used a black oval logo with raised Klipsch and 'V' of a variety of sizes. This type of logo was a painted Copper electroformed shell on a plastic base with various attachment methods.

          3. In addition, the 'A' line (epic) had a wide 'V' on the bottom with centered Klipsch and small PWK logo in copper or gold color (e.g. Epic series).

          4. The Heritage logos were/are secured to the grills, centered usually within ½" to 3/4" from the top edge of the grill with types b & c, and either on the upper left or upper right for type a (pie slices). The glue used is contact cement. The "d" type for the Klipschorn on the type "B" (collared), was held on the collar with two small pin nails. Current Heritage “pie slice” logos are secured with PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive)

 

 

X. HERITAGE PRODUCTION NOTES & TIME LINES:

1. HERESY:

  • 1957: The Heresy is introduced as a center channel for the Klipschorn. It is the first Klipsch speaker that does not require corner placement. This model utilized the K-1000 midrange horn. These are rare, and one example in the Museum in Hope is the rarest of all the Klipsch Heritage speakers.
  • 1957 - 1959: Both 8" and 12" woofer versions were produced during this period.
  • 1967 - The H-700 is introduced in the now familiar format using a 12" K-22 woofer (There were several variants used E, EF, K) K-700 horn; K-55-V mid-range and the K-77 (T-35 type Alnico magnet) tweeter.
  • From this date through the end of the model run in 1985, various networks were used: Type C, Type E and Type E-2. All were variations on the same design.
  • 1972-1973: The Heresy's name is changed from H-700 to Heresy.
  • 1983-1984: The K-24 woofer is substituted for the K-22, and during the last production of the Heresy-I, the midrange K-53/701 is substituted for the K-55/700.
  • 1985: The Heresy II is introduced using a mid-range and tweeter driver set that, for the first time since the introduction of the H-700 differed from that of the Klipschorn. Component designations were: Woofer K-24-K, Midrange K-701 horn and K-52 driver (the mid range assembly was also stamped K-53 on the driver). The tweeter is K-75-K horn and K-76 driver. This was the first Heresy model to discontinue the use the traditional alpha numeric network designations (Type E-2). All of the drivers in the Heresy II were front mounted to reduce the diffraction effects caused by rear mounting and firing through the motor board.
  • May 2001: Finish, grill and riser variant options are reduced from nearly 100 to 10.
  • Sept 29, 2005: The Heresy III is introduced featuring increased sensitivity (3dB), Titanium mid-range and tweeter diaphragms, Tractrix tweeter horn and bi-wire inputs. Component designations are: Woofer K-28-E, Midrange K-53-Ti (K-701 horn and K-53-Ti driver), Tweeter K-107-Ti (K-79-T horn and K-100-Ti driver). Finish, grille and riser variations are further reduced from 10 to 3.
  • May 2006: The Heresy III midrange compression driver is sourced to a new supplier and the network is revised to compensate for the change.
  • 2008+: There have been a number of improvements produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information.

 

2. CORNWALL:

  • Oct 1959: The Cornwall is introduced as the world's second commercially produced center speaker. A speaker with higher output capability than the Heresy was needed when used in three speaker arrays between Klipschorn’s. Component designations: Woofer EV 15WK, Midrange K-1000 Horn and University SAHF Driver, Tweeter K-77
  • Late 1959: Transition to the K-33-J Woofer (Jensen)
  • 1959 - 1961: Sporadic transition to the K-55-V mid-range driver (Atlas)
  • Jan 1963: The K-1000 diffraction type midrange horn was replaced with the exponential K-600 horn with a lower (600 Hz) cutoff.
  • Sept 1967: Transition to the K-33-M. The records are not clear as to the origin of this driver but it is believed to be an Eminence driver with an Alnico magnet.
  • Jan 1968: Transition to The K-33-P Woofer (CTS Paducah KY)
  • 1974: The horizontal version of the Cornwall is discontinued
  • 1974: K-56 mid-range driver (Electrovoice 1828) is used for a short period as a temporary replacement as the supply of K-55-V drivers was interrupted.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975-1979: K-33-E and the K-33-B were used interchangeably.
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively
  • June 1981: The updated B2 network, with steeper crossover slopes is phased in with no changes to the K-33-E, K-55-V and K-77-M drivers.
  • Oct 1981 - March 1983: The transition between four different iterations of the midrange driver from revolving sources occurs during this period. The original K-55-V was changed to a K-51-V (10/19/81) This marked the first time in the Cornwall's history that it used a driver set that differed from that of the Klipschorn. The K-51-V was then changed to the K-55-G (essentially a ceramic magnet version of the Atlas Alnico K-55-V). The K-55-G was then changed to the Hepner built K-52-H and finally the Klipsch built K-52-K.
  • Mar 1983: The B-3 network and the K-52 midrange driver starts to be used in this model.  Component designations were: Woofer Eminence K-33-E, Midrange K-57-K (K-600 Aluminum horn and K-52-K driver with the threaded snout), Tweeter K-77-M and B-3 network.
  • Jan 1986: The Cornwall II is introduced featuring front mounted drivers to reduce baffle induced diffraction effects. Component designations were: Woofer Eminence K-34-E (K-33-E with a dressy pad ring), Midrange K-57-K (K-601 plastic horn and K-52-K driver), Tweeter K-79-K (K-75-K horn and K-79 driver) and CW II network.
  • 1990: The Cornwall II is discontinued
  • Mar 2006: The Cornwall III is introduced marking the end of the Cornwall's 15 year absence from the market. This version utilizes the Klipschorn woofer, the horn and driver set from the Heresy III (featuring Titanium diaphragms and a Tractrix® tweeter horn) and bi-wire inputs. Component designations are: Woofer K-33-E, Midrange K-53-Ti (K-701 horn and K-53-Ti driver), Tweeter K-107-Ti (K-79-T horn and K-100-Ti driver).
  • 2008+: There have been a number of newer models produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information.

 

3. LASCALA:

  • 1963: The La Scala is designed as a portable version of the Klipschorn to be used as a P.A. system for Winthrop Rockefeller's Arkansas gubernatorial campaign. Component designations were: Woofer K-33-J (Jensen), Midrange K-400 horn and K-55-V driver (Atlas), Tweeter K-77 (Electrovoice).
  • 1966: The designation for the Type 1RC crossover network was changed to Type A. 
  • Sept 1967: Transition to the K-33-M. The records are not clear as to the origin of this driver but it is believed to be an Eminence driver with an Alnico magnet.
  • Jan 1968: Transition to The K-33-P Woofer (CTS Paducah KY)
  • 1971: The Type AA crossover network was introduced featuring Sneer diode tweeter protection.
  • 1974: K-56 mid-range driver (Electrovoice 1828) is used for a short period as a temporary replacement as the supply of K-55-V drivers was interrupted.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975? - 1979: K-33-E (Eminence) and the K-33-B were used interchangeably.
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively.
  • 1983: The Type AL crossover network was introduced incorporating steeper filter slopes for enhanced tweeter protection and smoother response in the crossover regions.
  • 1983: The Type AL-2 network was introduced to accommodate the new K-55-M mid-range driver. This Electrovoice sourced driver was essentially the same as the previous K-55-V with a smoother response.
  • 1987: The aluminum K-400 horn was replaced with the K-401 structural foam horn resulting in slightly improved distortion figures.
  • 1989: The AL-3 network was introduced to correct for a shift in the output of the K-55-M mid-range driver.
  • 2000: Electrovoice ceases production of the K-77-M and K-55-M tweeter and mid-range drivers. The search for replacement drivers and the acquisition of the EV tooling is sought. Very limited production of a few pairs occurs at the end of 2000 and the early months of 2001 using existing part stocks
  • May 2001: The Atlas PD-5VH (Current version of the previous K-55-V) is modified slightly and christened the K-55-X. The various components of the K-77-M tweeter are either retooled or sourced from the new owners of the tooling and assembled by a third party. This variant of the tweeter is designated the K-77-F. An entirely new network (AL-4) was created to accommodate these driver changes. Fusing is eliminated in favor of a polyswitch for tweeter protection. The tweeter on the La Scala was flush mounted for the first time using "Z" brackets. A metal input panel with binding posts in a bi-wire configuration replaced the traditional screw type barrier block.
  • Dec 2005: The La Scala II debuted as the first "finished" version of this model featuring a two piece veneered cabinet utilizing 1" MDF instead of the traditional 3/4" plywood. The AL-5 network was introduced to compensate for the improvement in low frequency response resulting from the change in cabinet construction. The HF and LF cabinets stacked together using thick rubber isolating spacers. Finish variants were  reduced from 6 to 3.
  • April 2006: The horn portion of the K-77-F tweeter was re-tooled to include a recessed flange eliminating the need for the separate "Z" bracket and attachment rivets, the new designation is the K-77-D. This also allowed the updating of pre-Z bracket La Scala’s (prior to May 2001) to flush tweeter status without motor board modification.
  • 2008+: There have been a number of new versions produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information.

 

4. BELLE KLIPSCH:

  • 1971: Belle Klipsch was introduced as a more elegant or finished version of the La Scala. Component designations were: Woofer K-33-P (CTS, Paducah KY), Midrange K-500 horn and K-55-V driver (Atlas), Tweeter K-77 (Electrovoice).
  • July 1971: The Type AA crossover network was introduced featuring Zener diode tweeter protection.
  • 1974: K-56 mid-range driver (Electrovoice 1828) is used for a short period as a temporary replacement as the supply of K-55-V drivers was interrupted.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975? - 1979: K-33-E (Eminence) and the K-33-B were used interchangeably.
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively
  • Feb 1983: The Type-AB crossover network was introduced incorporating steeper filter slopes for enhanced tweeter protection and smoother response in the crossover regions.
  • Oct 1983: The Type AB-2 network was introduced to accommodate the new K-55-M mid-range driver. This Electrovoice sourced driver was essentially the same as the previous K-55-V with a smoother response.
  • 2000: Electrovoice ceases production of the K-77-M and K-55-M tweeter and mid-range drivers. The search for replacement drivers and the acquisition of the EV tooling is sought. Very limited production of a few pairs occurs at the end of 2000 and the early months of 2001 using existing part stocks
  • May 2001: The Atlas PD-5VH (Current version of the previous K-55-V) is modified slightly and christened the K-55-X. The various components of the K-77-M tweeter are either retooled or sourced from the new owners of the tooling and assembled by a third party. This variant of the tweeter is designated the K-77-F. An entirely new network (AB-3) was created to accommodate these driver changes. Fusing is eliminated in favor of a polyswitch for tweeter protection. A metal input panel with binding posts in a bi-wire configuration replaced the traditional screw type barrier block.
  • Late 2005 - Early 2006: The Belle Klipsch is phased out of production as parts are used up.

 

6. KLIPSCHORN:

  • 1930: While working In Chile, S.A. PWK was an amateur radio enthusiast. Comparing various types of radio speakers, he recognized the superior efficiency of horns.
  • 1933: Back in the U.S. at Stanford University, PWK made note of a classmates comment that "speakers sound better in a corner".
  • 1934: Still at Stanford, PWK read the Symposium on Auditory Perspective by Bell Telephone Laboratories.
  • 1939-41: The above mentioned facts were blended into a design philosophy. PWK drew pictures and built paper models that were to become the "Klipschorn".
  • Feb 1940: Paul Klipsch applies for a patent on his first prototype cornerhorn, the X-1.  It was during patent "negotiations" that he first learned of prior art cornerhorns. There were several such designs.
  • 1941: While stationed at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds, PWK reviewed and corrected his first manuscript on corner horns. Note: A second design was prototyped as X-2, but was destroyed by termites before meaningful measurements could be made.
  • May 1942: The first successful prototype (X-3) was built in Paul Klipsch's garage using only hand tools. This basic corner woofer has changed little over the years. This was serial number 1.
  • Oct 1942: Paul Klipsch applied for a patent on X3.
  • Feb 1943: Paul received a patent on his first (unsuccessful) prototype, the X-1.
  • April 1945: A patent was granted for the third prototype (X3) which was to become the Klipschorn.
  • June 1945: Another patent was applied for describing Paul's second high frequency horn (X-5). This later became the K-5-H horn.
  • 1946: Klipsch and Associates was incorporated.
  • Early 1947: The first production run of 12 units, serial numbers 2-13 were built to Paul's specifications by the Baldwin Piano & Organ Company of Cincinnati Ohio.  The high frequency driver in these was the WE713A.  At least one of the woofers was a JBL.
  • Late 1947 - Early 1948: Seven more serial numbers 14-20 were built by hand in a local cabinet shop. Paul Klipsch recalled that no more than two were alike. It was during these "experiments" that the LF horn's "sinus" cavities were added to the woofer's back air chamber to maximize acoustic capacitance. Component Designations: High frequency Western Electric 713A, Woofer unknown.
  • June 1948: The first Klipschorn to be built in the first actual Klipsch factory was S/N 121. The building was formerly the telephone exchange building for the Southwest Proving Grounds and is currently the Klipsch Museum of Audio History. Component Designations: The early production logs (1949) first make reference to the use of the Jensen P-15-LL woofer. The production log makes reference to a total of 26 Klipschorn’s built this year.
  • 1949: The Stephens P52LX2 becomes the primary woofer. This driver is used through August of 1953 when the transition to the Stephens 103LX2 was made. The Stephens P15 High frequency driver starts appearing in the logbook. 
  • Aug 1950: The Electrovoice EV 15WK woofer is first referenced in the production logs and is used interchangeably with both of the Stephens woofers and the early K-33-J woofers until March of 1961
  • 1951: The University SAHF replaces the Stephens P15 as the primary high frequency driver.
  • June 1951: The first three-way Klipschorn incorporated a Jensen RP203 tweeter. This tweeter came from the famous Jensen G-610 Triaxial 15" driver and required considerable negotiations with Jensen. It was not until mid-1952 that all Klipschorn’s were three-way. A two-way Klipschorn with response to 12Khz was generally adequate for program material up to that time. The University MID-T-4401 replaced the Jensen unit as the tweeter of choice later in 1951.
  • July 1952: The original K-5-H high frequency horn of the patent was modified to become the K-5-J. This involved changing the vertical taper so that the dividers ("boats") could be removed. This resulted in a production cost savings, not an acoustical improvement.
  • Sept 1952: A cardboard shipping container was used for the first time. Prior to this all Klipschorn’s® were shipped in wooden crates. The last wood crate was used on S/N 912 on June 13, 1955
  • Aug 1953: The Stephens 103LX2 Woofer starts to be used
  • 1955: K-500 / 5000 network phased out in favor of the 1 RC (Type A network)
  • Nov 1957 - May 5, 1958: This was the transition period between the University 4401 tweeter and the Electrovoice Alnico magnet T-35 (K-77) which yielded substantially flat response to 17Khz
  • Aug 1959: The first shipment of Electrovoice T-35 tweeters designated as K-77 is received. The K-77 is first used in S/N 1445 on Oct 15,1959
  • Nov 1958: Driver polarities were first observed and made consistent. This practice was initiated due to marginal improvements noted during listening tests.
  • Apr 1960: Transition to the K-33-J Woofer (Jensen) from the EV 15WK began. And University SAHF mid-range drivers started to be designated and labeled as K-55
  • May - Sept 1961: This was the transition period between the 6" high woofer horn throat and the current 3" high throat. This boosted output in the 400 - 500 Hz range further smoothing the response. Multi-tapered wedges were also added to the woofer throat (opposite side of the motor board from the driver) to further improve the response in this region. The use of these wedges was soon abandoned but the smaller throat dimensions were retained and are in use today.
  • Nov 1961: The Atlas K-55-V Alnico magnet mid-range driver is introduced. This driver was patterned after the famous Western Electric 555-W.
  • 1963 - May 1964: The K-5-J mid-range horn was replaced with the K-400 resulting in a flatter overall spectral balance, particularly in both crossover regions.
  • Oct. 24, 1966: The designation for the Type 1RC crossover network was changed to Type A. 
  • Sept 1967: Transition to the K-33-M.
  • Jan 1968: Transition to The K-33-P Woofer (CTS Paducah KY)
  • July 1971: The Type AA crossover network was introduced featuring Zener diode tweeter protection.
  • 1975: Transition to The K-33-B Woofer (CTS Brownsville TX)
  • 1975-1979: K-33-E (Eminence) and the K-33-B were used interchangeably. The records are not specific about the actual start date for the K-33-E but it is believed to be in the early to mid 1970's
  • 1979: The Eminence K-33-E woofer is used exclusively
  • Feb 1, 1983: The two piece Type-AK crossover network was introduced incorporating fusing and steeper filter slopes for enhanced tweeter protection and smoother response in the crossover regions. Heavy gauge (10 AWG) internal wiring was used throughout and binding posts replaced the traditional screw type barrier block as input terminals. The tweeter was flush mounted in the baffle using "Z" brackets. Rubber wall gaskets were added to the sides of the tailboard to improve the seal to less than perfect wall surfaces.
  • Oct 1983: The Type AK-2 network was introduced to accommodate the new Ceramic Magnet K-55-M mid-range driver. This Electrovoice sourced driver was essentially the same as the previous K-55-V with a ceramic magnet and a smoother response
  • Apr 1987: The "D" style decorator cabinet (no cosmetic panels or grilles) was discontinued.
  • Nov 1987: The Aluminum K-400 horn was replaced with the K-401 structural foam horn resulting in slightly improved distortion figures.
  • Oct 1989: The AK-3 network was introduced to correct for a shift in the output of the K-55-M mid-range driver.
  • 1995: A limited edition of the Klipschorn is produced to mark the 50th anniversary of the company and the Klipschorn. A total of 150 pairs were offered in three different finishes but less than 50 pairs total were sold. The only changes to this model were cosmetic.
  • Aug 1995: The "C" style cabinet (no intermediate collar or kick plate) was discontinued
  • 2000: Electrovoice ceases production of the K-77-M and K-55-M tweeter and mid-range drivers. The search for replacement drivers and the acquisition of the EV tooling is sought. Very limited production of a few pairs occurs at the end of 2000 and the early months of 2001 using existing part stocks
  • May 2001: The Atlas PD-5VH (Current version of the previous K-55-V) is modified slightly and christened the K-55-X. The various components of the K-77-M tweeter are either retooled or sourced from the new owners of the tooling and assembled by a third party. This variant of the tweeter is designated the K-77-F. An entirely new one piece network, located on the woofer door, (AK-4) was created to accommodate these driver changes. Fusing is eliminated in favor of a Polyswitch for tweeter protection and a trap circuit was added to tame the longstanding response peak in the middle of the woofer's pass band, resulting in an improved spectral balance. The number of variants available was reduced by the elimination of the Brown and Cane grille cloths and oil finishes.
  • Dec 2005: The Type AK-5 network was introduced to compensate for the improvement in low frequency response resulting from the addition of a horizontal wall seal to the top of the low frequency cabinet. The style "B" cabinet was discontinued by the elimination of the inset "intermediate collar" and visible "woofer top" panel in favor of a 3/8" gap between the cabinets. The long standing angle brackets, hanger bolts and wing nuts used to attach the HF and LF cabinets together were replaced with thick rubber spacers, on the LF cabinet, indexed into recesses on the HF cabinet.
  • April 2006: The horn portion of the K-77-F tweeter was re-tooled to include a recessed flange eliminating the need for the separate "Z" bracket and attachment rivets. This also allowed the updating of pre-Z bracket Klipschorn’s (prior to Feb 1,1983) to flush tweeter status without motor board modification. This variant was designated as the K-77-D
  • April 2006: A special limited edition Klipschorn was produced to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the company and the speaker itself. Low frequency response was enhanced with the addition of rear low frequency horn panels. This eliminated the need for a tight fit into the corner and permitted toe-in and toe-out flexibility for the first time. Additional upgrades were made to the binding posts, internal wiring, and network component specifications. Aesthetic enhancements included a Lacewood veneer finish on the LF cabinet and a high gloss Black finish on the HF cabinet. The traditional wood kick plate was replaced with a machined and anodized Aluminum version containing a Silver finish PWK logo containing a real diamond. The rear of the HF cabinet was totally enclosed with finished panels featuring display windows for a commemorative numbered plaque and the HF network. 200 pairs were produced

2008+: There have been a number of “special editions” produced, and Klipsch has transitioned the crossovers to a more modern design. For information on the recent changes, please go to the website (Klipsch.com) for product information

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See attached... Sorry for the previous problems...

Thanks for the file!

 

Had to love the new Xfiles, goes with your name Area51!

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Lotta hours went into that compendium of data fellas, enjoy it and keep it alive on the Forums please! 

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