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Posted (edited)

Hello fellow Klipsch fans.

 

Recently there was a nasty power surge in my area and, unluckily, my receiver happened to be plugged straight into the outlet the day it happened.

 

Since then, whenever a sound hits a certain pitch, there's this harsh crackly noise.  I thought it may have been the content I was playing, but I've tested other disks/media and it persisted (so long as it was the right pitch or tone).  Then I considered it was my receiver, so I tried an older one, but it wasn't that either.

 

It looks like it's my speakers.  I haven't tested (or noticed anything wrong with) the sides or rears yet.  But my two fronts (RF 7II) and center (RC-64II) have the issue.  It seems to be coming from the tweeter and I haven't noticed anything else wrong with the speakers but this.

 

I recorded the problem and the wav should be listenable here.  In the clip (there's a piece of paper being torn in the scene, ignore that) the harsh clipping/crackling noise is evident multiple times throughout.  It's even more pronounced on my normal receiver (x6400h), maybe because it drives more power to the speakers.

 

I love these speakers.  They're the life of my entertainment. 

 

Is there anything I can do to fix them?  Or any sort of troubleshooting I can do to determine if they are fixable?

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Edited by MassiveG
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You can use an ohm meter to determine if the tweeters are operating within spec (ask Klipsch maybe? or call "the speaker exchange") then go from there. If they are damaged it should show with a meter. If they are damaged you should be able to replace the tweeter or diaphragm . I'm no repair guy for sure, I have replaced tweeter diaphragms in my reference before. The point is with a few calls you should be pointed in the right direction.

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A meter will not indicate if the tweeter diaphram is damaged only if it is reading "open" non-functional (no resistance).  If the coil was damaged but the tweeter is still working although noisy the meter certainly will not have a different ohm reading to indicate that.  If anything you should be able to just replace the damaged diaphrams to bring them back up to specification.

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That's good to know. I said operating within spec but just operating is the key . I guess you would not even need an ohm meter for that, ears. When mine quit, as they often do with reference Klipsch I just replace them.

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