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JRH

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  1. Boom3 got part of it right! Sequential serial numbers did not necessarily ship sequentially, due to some units likely being put on the back burner for the rush orders. I'd like to see the document referenced as "KLIPSCH HERITAGE REFERENCE DATA - (V.3 - 23 Aug 2013)". I hope to Hell I did not generate it! The 1955 timeframe should be 1963, and not necessarily those specific days. It is true that #1811 was followed NUMERICALLY by 1A812. And by the way, #1700 shipped a week after 1A812!
  2. It was Lloyd. His initials are on the first picture in this thread, where "FINISH" was crossed out.
  3. Both of these shipped March 29, 1963. My guess is that the original owner could not immediately afford 2 Klipschorns for stereo, so he bought the Heresy to intially serve as the second channel, with the idea of adding a Klipschorn later, and then using the Heresy for a center.
  4. Sorry. It hasn't "come top the top".
  5. Chris is definitely on the right "track"! PWK religiously used two widely spaced omni's. This minimalist approach supported his desire to use a derived center channel at playback. The electrical sum of left and right can be shown to be virtually identical to an actual center mic. Attached is his philosophy in his own words.
  6. Actual numbers would have to come from a literal examination of every hand-written logbook entry, not something I plan to do. In any case, these hand-written records end in the early 80's when "computers took over". With a fast succession of platforms, the electronic data is lost.
  7. Beyond the general "Codec" published for many years on the Forum, I am not aware of such.
  8. There seems to be a little "Marketing license" in this advertisement (imagine that!). The 1956 date is a year too early (musta needed "30 years" in 1986), and it was not PWK's "second speaker". There were several generations of the Rebel, as well as the Shorthorn ahead of the Heresy. The Cornwall and Heresy both started life with the K-1000 diffraction horn. In January 1963 the Cornwall went to the K-600. It was not until May 20, 1966 that the Heresy changed to the K-700. However, the K-1000 still appears in many Heresy's after that date until at least 1967.
  9. Both shipped on 11 Oct. 1961. There is no indication of destination, but the grill cloth is referred to as "Chicopee 5247". Good thing you didn't get the next two. They were "B" versions, meaning no squawker or tweeter. Just a 12" with whizzer cone, and meant for upgrading when customer funds became available.
  10. The original driver in the MSSM was a Cetec 10". This was soon replaced with an Eminence K-41-E.
  11. This occurred in 1977, a year or so before I showed up. In speaking with Gary, he said he did attend the show in Fox, AR, and left early. His recollection was that the show was horrible, lots of crazies, paramedics treating OD's, and no other Klipsch employees to be seen. The MCM's were a Bob Moers effort. When returned to Hope, there were no signs of "flames". Just open voice coils. At the time the MCM's were essentially in prototype form. They were 3-ways with the Cetec HF4000 midranges and K-33-E woofers. Don Keele did the inspection of the returned speakers. His piezo tweeter arrays were the only survivors. This experience was likely to be the impetus to develop the K-43-E woofer, the MSSM "sub-squawker", and the 4-barrel manifold for K-55's. There have definitely been speakers returned with "flame damage", but according to Gary, not these. I suspect there may be "burnt pics" in the Archives that I have yet to run into, but Gary says he did not take any of this particular event.
  12. I don't know about "quiet", but he was patently underwhelmed in general. No doubt about it.
  13. I started in 1978, and most, if not all, amps were solid state. Crown, Mark Levinson, BGW, Revox, etc. I suspect the changeover could be determined, but it would take a heck of lot of research that I am not currently in the position of executing. I doubt it was a step function.
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