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RoboKlipsch

Roboklipsch's DIYSG 4cft ported build using Legacy EF 15" Driver

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22 hours ago, jason str said:

Its easier to sand off an edge than it is to sand down the whole panel to line up with the edge.

 

Make sure the work is flat, imperfections will show right through the veneer.

Thank you i did exactly that.  Took about 4 hours to do both by hand.  Loving this project.  Post sanding they really look nice.  Pics to come.

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For veneer grain direction what is standard...vertical grain on all sides and top going in which direction? 

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I think you will have to look at the pattern and then decide.  Here are a couple of pic's that may help.

images.jpg

s884891237978113168_p9_i5_w1969.jpeg

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I'm posting a few shots after the initial sanding down of the edges.  Sanding was able to get the whole box smooth without problems, so no fill was needed.

 

After these photos, I have done a quick sanding of the entire cabinets with 120 grit, and have used sanding sealer to seal both cabinets.  I'm waiting for them to dry so that I can flip them over and get the bottoms done.

 

For the rookies, all the talk about the edges of the mdf sucking up the sealer is true.  You really have to specifically dab it on those spots and then spread around the rest.  I can see how important the sealing is to get a smooth and protected finish.

 

Veneer just arrived also, so things are moving along.  If anybody has experience with the veneer and can make comments/suggestions about how, where and how long to let it rest please let me know.  I could leave the veneer out in the garage for several days to acclimate, but I know it may rain tonight into tomorrow, so I'm thinking maybe it's best to bring it out tomorrow after the rain ends and let it sit for a few days?  Garage would be easiest to install and finish, but inside the house has it's own perks of course including a nice climate controlled area.    Building these is incredibly fun, and an incredibly labor intensive effort.

 

Ported Sub Build Pic15.jpgPorted Sub Build Pic16.jpgPorted Sub Build Pic17.jpg

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Also wanted to add that a HEPA vacuum seems to be a real nice thing to have around, I used it to suck up all the sawdust and used a brush attachment on the vacuum.  Once the project is complete, toss out the vacuum bag and put in a new one...good to go.

 

Application of sanding sealer was easier than any paint I've put down before, pretty simple process fyi rookies. 

 

 

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The boxes look great Rob! Now on to  the veneer.  The dust from MDF is thin and flys everywhere in the garage.

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I don't know if you need to let the veneer acclimate. It has a backing on it, so there won't be a lot of movement.

 

i was careful to wrap my sides and top like this so the grain flowed from one side to the other. I didn't care about the bottom but started on the left side and cut the veneer so close to actual size that you can't really see any difference in grain as you go over the top and then to the right side.

 

photo1_zpsc0173805.jpg

 

photo5_zps0f8b8d0e.jpg

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20 hours ago, ryanm84 said:

I don't know if you need to let the veneer acclimate. It has a backing on it, so there won't be a lot of movement.

 

i was careful to wrap my sides and top like this so the grain flowed from one side to the other. I didn't care about the bottom but started on the left side and cut the veneer so close to actual size that you can't really see any difference in grain as you go over the top and then to the right side.

 

photo1_zpsc0173805.jpg

 

photo5_zps0f8b8d0e.jpg

That's nice looking. Walnut? Hard to tell from the pic

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7 hours ago, ryanm84 said:

Yes walnut. Really came to life after adding oil.

Ryan that looks better than pro made ones, nice job.  What did you finish with?

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I used 2 different Watco oils-a light oak for some nice brown base and then medium walnut for the darker color. I messed around with the number of coats of each on a scrap of veneer. Once I liked the color I had I was ready to apply to the boxes. It was a fun project for sure.

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On 9/9/2016 at 8:32 PM, ryanm84 said:

I don't know if you need to let the veneer acclimate. It has a backing on it, so there won't be a lot of movement.

 

i was careful to wrap my sides and top like this so the grain flowed from one side to the other. I didn't care about the bottom but started on the left side and cut the veneer so close to actual size that you can't really see any difference in grain as you go over the top and then to the right side.

 

photo1_zpsc0173805.jpg

 

photo5_zps0f8b8d0e.jpg

Thanks again, the finish looks awesome.  The sheets came with a few information sheets and one of those sheets repeats about 10x  ACCLIMATE....ACCLIMATE.....etc, they say for 4 days potentially.  I guess in the end it's not that important, if I really care then wait 4 days :)  I plan to wait at least a couple just to relax and focus on something besides the sub build in my free time.  

 

When you attached the sheets, did you always have overhang on all 4 sides?  How much if I may ask?  

As far as scraping the veneer to lay down the laminate, how hard are we talking as far as pressure?

 

Thanks for your input and sharing your results.  A really nice job and creative finish 

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Scrappy can you please point me to your build thread?  I know I read through it once long ago searching on google but wanted to check out your finishing of the subs :emotion-21:

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Update....I've gotten to the point now where they are ready for attaching the veneer.  The veneer is acclimating to the garage where the sub boxes are, and the sub boxes are now sealed and sanded.  My first thought about the build process is again, wow there's a lot of work there.  Derrick's carefully placed recommendation of getting an orbital sander rings true....very true :emotion-55:

 

The pre-finishing process consisted of sanding down the box edges with a rough sandpaper, followed by sanding the entire box with 120 grit.  I then used a brush attachment on the HEPA vacuum to vacuum up the dust from the boxes, and then the surrounding area.   I thought the hand sanding process was key to understand what was really needed to get it done right.  In the future, a sander would certainly save a lot of effort.

 

Next was Sanding Sealer.  Applied with a brush.  I recommend to rookies you seal the top and sides down to a few inches from the bottom, and be careful not to allow drops of the sealer to drip down to the bottom.  Thin coat, but liberal application to any edges to start and allow them to suck up lots of sealer.  It seemed to be dry after 4 hours, I flipped over the boxes and then did the other side and the few inches not covered.  Then it was left to dry overnight.

 

Next day, sand it down using 120 grit, followed by a gentle 220 grit sanding.  Suck up the dust again, then reapply the sealer in the same fashion, being more careful this time to get as smooth a finish as possible.  Once fully dry, I sanded again with 220 and then 440 grit sandpaper.    

 

All this in the garage, there's still a lot of dust that you can't easily see.  I covered up the subs with a big blanket, then brought out the leaf blower and an extension cord.  Hat tip to wherever I read it on the web, but the leaf blower was amazing at getting the dust out of the garage.  I did it once, let it settle for a few minutes, then did it a second time.  Then I took off the blanket and did it a third time, this time also using it to remove any dust on the cabinets.  Once complete the garage was as free of dust as I could get it.

 

Then I brought out the veneer, unrolled it and used a few weights and objects to flatten it out at the edges.  I'm surprised how nice it looks once unrolled, really a nice finish and I hope I can do a good job getting it attached.  It is a PSA veneer, requiring only that it be cut right and then scraped down hard onto the wood several times.  

 

Pictures show the boxes covered in sealer but not sanded.   Sorry if the color isn't great, the garage is dark and with the door open it's still not easy to see in a picture.  Next pictures show the boxes fully sanded, and also a shot of the veneer.  Half the veneer was in sunlight from outside, the other half not in case you see the color change.  All of it is in the closed garage not getting direct sunlight normally.  

 

Having a great time with this thing.  it is an incredibly large amount of manual labor, but could easily be mitigated with a few power tools.  

Ported Sub Build Pic18.jpg

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Keep on pushin'.  The finish is a lot work.  That's why ID companies charge more.  A black paint finish is much easier but, then it's just another big black box, lol.

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My veneer wasn't PSA, I used contact cement and a veneer scraper to get a really good bond. Cornwall cabinets are huge so I went over it a bunch of times and I pressed pretty hard, especially around the edges.

 

I cut my pieces of veneer within an 1/8 or so. I used a flush cutting router bit to take it close but then I literally shaved down every inch with a very sharp blade. I didn't use a rasp or anything like that because I was worried about pulling up the edge veneer. I also used edge banding to finish the unfinished plywood. 

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Is it necessary then to do one panel at a time and trim before moving to the next panel?  Seems like the overhang would prevent you from putting them all down at once.

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12 hours ago, FuzzyDog said:

Is that the premium or standard mahogany?  Looks really clean.

Khaya.  Only one grade offered but it came almost perfect.  A few pin knots thsts about it.  

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