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Thaddeus Smith

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Thaddeus Smith last won the day on September 11 2016

Thaddeus Smith had the most liked content!

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About Thaddeus Smith

  • Rank
    Snark Patrol
  • Birthday 04/23/1982

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Dallas, TX
  • My System
    4.1 system: Onkyo TX-NR1010 // Fronts: KP-201-BR // Surrounds: R-3650-W // 80Hz and below: diy Cinema f-20 // HTPC + Plex // Mitsubishi WD-73738 // Harmony 900
  1. Using a low power SEP for HT?

    So what's the verdict?
  2. KI 396 vs RF7 III

    Couldn't remember if they were Rev 3 or not
  3. KI 396 vs RF7 III

    @CECAA850 can give a comparison to original RF-7's. @MetropolisLakeOutfitters can compare against Forte 3, RF something something and Jubes.
  4. SOLD: Klipsch Lascala’s $900 - Arkansas

    Not gonna work for me, but definitely a good deal. I bought a similar pair from the little rock area a year ago - roughly the same vintage, cabinets needing more tlc but included an extra pair of reworked AA networks - for the same price. This is definitely a good deal and Hogfan has always seemed pleasant to deal with from member feedback.
  5. SOLD: Klipsch Lascala’s $900 - Arkansas

    Oh man.. PM Sent.
  6. What I really, realy, really, really, really miss about...

    Toy aisles in grocery stores. My mom used to leave me there when she did her weekly shopping trip and I'd play with the stuff that wasn't in a package, agonizing over the action figures and which would be my next purchase once I had enough allowance saved up.
  7. New in my Life Raising Chickens

    Baby steps indeed. The first coop (now for juveniles) had a 16x16ft run attached, basically 4 cattle panels square. The barn was full of trash and just a dumping ground for everything I didn't want in the garage, which was full of crap I didn't want in the house. It took me about a month to clean up, burn, bury, haul it all off and start to prep for birds and goats. A year later and I continue to refine things but overall it's working out like I had planned. We're on year 3 or so since we started buying and growing livestock and in it for the long haul, so just taking our time and growing in manageable increments.
  8. The Fifteen

    But not fuckwit, so that's cool.
  9. The Fifteen

    Apparently standard anatomy terms like v a g i n a do too.
  10. The Fifteen

    It's a slang term for ******, so it get's caught in standard profanity filters.
  11. New in my Life Raising Chickens

    Might as well share my setup. This was a horse/donkey barn with a couple of paddocks, so I tried to reuse core infrastructure as much as possible. Here's an outside view of the coop entrance and their run. It's roughly 32x32ft. The green corner is for wind/sun protection (was more important when I didn't free range them). We typically don't close the coop hatch and instead just close the gate the to the run each night. We've only had one snake problem over the course of 2 years. Aviary netting over top, supported by the 2" pvc frame. The uprights are simply placed over top of some T-posts. It stays up wonderfully and flexes enough in the wind that nothing breaks. Here's the entrance to the run. I have a lot of cattle panels, so I cut them up all sorts of ways and use them as the skeleton for things, tie-wrapping various types of lighter fencing to them depending on the animal. It make conventional latching solutions a bit more difficult, so in this case we just lean a heavy paver stone against it to keep it shut. KISS. This was our first coop, built mostly out of scrap. Now we use it as a holding space for juvenile birds, currently ducks. From there they go into the main coop/run for egg layers, movable tractors in the pasture for meat birds, or exclusively free range if I just don't have a care/purpose for them. The coop itself is a converted tack room. Nothing fancy, but it keeps them dry and out of the sun. We use the deep litter method, so having full access for cleaning out the compost material is important. The structure on the left is an old wooden chaise lounge. Usually it sits flat so we can feed them during inclement weather, but they've been laying underneath it lately so I'm trying to break that habit. It has lights and electrical outlets, along with floors/ceiling/walls - it just made the logical choice for the coop. I cut a hole into the siding and built perches on each side. I anticipated to use the hatch door more but it hasn't seemed necessary. This was an old stock tank that was rotting away in the barn. Helps containin the layers and I'm all about re-purposing things. They'll lay in the buckets, or to the side of them, seemingly on a whim. So I try to just make sure there's enough straw to suit their needs. Nothing fancy here folks. My biggest concern was ventilation, so I took some of this wall down and threw up some hardware cloth. Expensive stuff, but worth it compared to chicken wire. A view from the other side (one of my goat pens). And then this is a rabbit hutch we got for free from a friend. Tightened everything up and now it serves as the brooder for all of our hatchlings. We do have a plastic tote brooder if we end up with chicks in the winter months and need to keep them indoors. They go from here to the juvenile pen after about 3-4 weeks.
  12. Inherited klipsch

    You should replace the Polk with the Klipschorns. Rearrange your living room if you have to. Sticking them unused into storage would be a travesty to your ears.
  13. What I Got Today!

    How did they avoid tripping fraud alerts?
  14. New in my Life Raising Chickens

    we've found pretty good success in just having roosters roaming around with our hens. we also keep an inner perimeter of about 20yds mowed on our pasture so that coyotes can't creep too close without being seen.
  15. New in my Life Raising Chickens

    I lost two flocks of Guineas because they would roost on the edge of my chicken run, only about 4.5ft high and predators would ****** them early in the morning while still asleep. I have one left.. the single male that learned to roost in the rafters of my barn, and he's the last one I'll own in the foreseeable future.
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