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artto

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  1. artto

    Jokes?

    An older couple who have been dating for a while were out for a nice dinner. Since they have been dating for a while and contemplating marriage, the old guy decides it's time to bring up the subject of sex. He asks her "How often do you like to have sex?" She says "infrequently". He leans over and asks "Is that one word or two?"
  2. artto

    Goodbye Onkyo...

    A little more in-depth explanation (with Paul Jacobs of Klipsch at the helm) https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/premium-audio-company-llc-comments-on-onkyo-home-entertainment-bankruptcy-filing-301548155.html BTW, bankruptcy doesn't necessarily mean the end of a company or brand. It's usually a form of "reorganization". However, the equity shareholders (stock) typically loose all as part of the reorganization as the company gets re-valued, and new stock issued (none of which goes to the "old" public shareholders)
  3. artto

    AXPONA 2022 CHICAGO

    Jay's facial expression at 1:44 says it all. As much as I don't like to admit it, I agree.
  4. WGN Morning News Chicago showed a old segment with Gottfried. Before Gottfried went on the air he asked news anchor Larry Potash if it was alright to say "penis" on the air. Larry told him "yes" because it was an anatomical word. Then Potash says "what we didn't expect, is for him to say it 26 times" 👍 Gilbert
  5. Yeah, I suspect there's several issues. First of all, I'm not using a traditional, separate "DAC". My endpoint is NAD M32. NAD recently released a new MDC USB module that supports DSD directly. I may have to install that to get better results. Right now, the same DSD recording sounds better when played from the DSF file burned to CD-R and played on my Sony SACD player. To me, it seems like there's too many "conversions" in the signal path. And as Thaddeus mentioned, I don't think my laptop is up to the task. It's a Pentium machine. I've used it for 24/96 multi-track recording. It's been optimized and tested for that. But later, when I experimented with various DSP plug-ins, such as Izotope Ozone on playback with J River, eventually I stopped using it for the same reason. The DSP "effects", while doing what they were supposed to, also seemed to have a negative effect on overall playback quality. My conclusion was that the CPU couldn't keep up with the processing load. I'll post the signal path when I get a chance. Regardless, I think I see an Intel NUC i7 on the horizon.
  6. https://scitechdaily.com/mit-scientists-develop-new-regenerative-drug-that-reverses-hearing-loss/ And, it appears that this drug therapy can also be applied to other disease such as MS.
  7. I assume you're referring to Elon MUSK. As I said above... Why? First of all, Klipsch is owned by Voxx International. So Voxx would have to be open to selling Klipsch in the first place. Second, Klipsch is one of Voxx best, if not their best performing asset. Therefore they would want a premium for it. And Musk of course would have to decide how long it take for him to get back that premium price paid. Regardless, what's the point? What Klipsch makes has nothing to do with what Musk, or any of his companies, his vision, is about. No Fit. I'm sure you audio veterans (old timers) remember Audiovox. Well, that's what is now Voxx International. YMMV, but I never associated Audiovox with "finer" audio. They were the cheap go to alternative.
  8. I have three Favorite Klipsch Speaker Experiences. 1. Back in college (70’s) I was at the Klipsch dealer in Urbana, Good Vibes. A Phase Linear sales rep was there to demonstrate their new “low powered” amp. I think it was 100w/ch. He played it through a pair of LaScala. It was ear splitting LOUD. The output power indicators barely lit up. Then he flips the mute switch on the preamp. I literally felt like I had been lifted several feet into the air. The immediate contrast to silence was absolutely deafening. Everyone in the room looked at each other, stunned. Then the sales rep says, “I guess these were the wrong speakers to demonstrate this.” LMAO 2. Some years later at a Chicago area Klipsch dealer (Hi-Fi Hutch), the sales guy is doing his thing for a young couple looking for speakers. He puts Supertramp/Crime of the Century, a popular demo record back then, on the turntable and cranks it up. The looks on that couple’s face was precious. The sales guy turns it off and asks “What do you think?”. They respond “OH NO!, we can’t afford anything like that!!!” He says “Sure you can, they’re well within your budget.” They say “Really?!! Those BIG speakers?”. Sales guys says No! You were listening to the little ones on top”. (Klipsch Heresy, sitting on top of the Khorns). The old jaw drop thing. They couldn’t believe it. So he did it again, even louder. One guess what they walked out of the store with. 3 This took place at my home in the listening room. Some of you long time members have heard this one before. My system was going to be published in Stereo Review’s “System of the Month”. So I got the bright idea to contact Sony and see if I could buy the soon to be released CDP-101, their first consumer CD player, at a discount of course, so it would be included in the photo shoot giving Sony a lot of cheap promo. They wouldn’t have any of that discount stuff, and there were only two units in the U.S at the time, on dealer tour. As an alternative, they guaranteed me first purchase off the initial shipment, and would send a Sony rep over to my place for the photo shoot and a listening demo. The Sony rep comes over. We set the CD player up and played a few CD. Sony rep goes to the bathroom. One of the guests present, Marmie (photographer’s girlfriend) (also a groupie and best friend with Survivor/Jim Peterik’s wife) turns around says “That Sucked!!!” (and it did, LOL). Sony rep comes back into the room and says “You know, I haven’t heard a really good system like this in a long time. I would really love to hear it ‘stretch its legs’. Would you happen to have that Tower of Power direct-to disk recording with Squibcakes on it?” Of course I do. I put that on the Linn and crank up the ARC SP-6 and Luxman triodes driving Klipschorns and Belle center. You should have seen the look on his face. I swear, his jaw must have dropped down to his knees. His head keeps turning as instruments, voices keep popping up across the 28 foot wide “sound stage”. And then around the 5 minute mark, Rocco Prestia’s bass expander kicks in and it was like the walls of the room blew out. The Sony rep was clearly stunned, even embarrassed and sheepishly left with his tail between his legs.
  9. While listening to some “violin” music last night I remembered another aspect to this subject. (Anne-Sophie Mutter, London Symphony Orchestra, Valery Gergiev conducting Bach, Violin Concertos & Gubaidulina, In tempus praesens /Deutsch Gramophone) A while back Chris A. mentioned something about all recordings seem to have their own “natural” playback level where it sounds best. I couldn’t agree more with Chris on this one. Personally, I’ve found a very wide range in recording reference level in commercial recordings. This difference can easily be as much as 20dB, or more. If the violins sound strident, try turning it down to a level where the violins (or the offending sound) no longer sound strident. Remember also, the more you turn up the volume, the more the room gets involved. The room’s acoustic properties can contribute to certain instruments/voices sounding strident. The main problem for most people when turning the volume down is that the nuances or fullness of quieter passages can get lost, because they are near or below the ambient noise level of the room. Turn it up, it’s too loud/strident on the loud parts. Consider the conditions most of us listen in. The typical home has an ambient noise level of about 55dB. Outside at my home the SPL is typically 65dB to 70dB or more (C weighted, calibrated). My listening room is around 30dB, lower if I temporarily turn off all appliances, HVAC, etc. IMHO, we don’t really need the full dynamic range of a live performance in the relatively small acoustic spaces we listen in. The room gets involved too much. Much more than, and in a very different way, than the actual concert hall does.
  10. First, let me share my credentials with you. I’ve made many recordings over the past 30+ years of “acoustic” music (voice and instruments) for the Glen Ellyn – Wheaton Chorale. Initially, these recordings were made live-in-concert, which in itself presents many logistical problems for using ideal microphone type and placement. In later years I was able to record at rehearsal prior to concert, primarily so I could master and produce some quantity of CDs for sale at concerts. All of these recordings have taken place in various churches, but in recent years at College Church, Wheaton, Illinois, which is known for its fine acoustics for Chorale music. The Chorale was always accompanied by a grand piano (Steinway), and guest musicians/singers. This might be a children’s choir with hand bells, or a trio of harps, string quartet, chamber orchestra, jazz band, etc. Also a smaller ensemble group from the Chorale. The first thing I suggest you do is Google “recording a violin”, or “Why does my violin recording sound so bad”. You’ll find that virtually anyone who plays violin, and has tried to record themselves absolutely hates the way they sound. For me, getting that woody sound, the texture, timbre of a violin, without the edginess, is probably one of the most difficult sounds to record and get right. Unfortunately, for me, I didn’t have the liberty to experiment and listen to playback before making any commitment to “the sound”. It was basically hit and miss, learn a little bit each time, as you go. I’ve used many mic techniques, everything from simple two spaced mics, three main mics, mutli-mic/mutli-track, and combinations thereof. Now a little bit about commercial recordings from small and big labels. Obviously, they have much bigger budgets with better equipment and more time, and experience than I do. However, for the most part, many of these “professional” recordings have similar characteristics. For one, (and IMO this IS a BIG deal), the “perspective” they present is more often than not, that of the conductor. It’s more like what they hear than what we hear sitting in the audience. Consider a recording technique like the well-known “Decca tree”. It’s a simple three (sometimes more) mic pickup. But where are the mics located? In a triangle “tree” held above the orchestra or above the conductor’s podium. There’s a big difference in this “sound” compared to where we sit in the audience. Then there’s the problem with multi-mics. These might be fill-in mics, or an array of multiple mics placed much closer to the instruments. Why would one do this? Well, if it’s a “live” concert or an older concert hall built before we had all the noise pollution, the mics might need to be placed closer to the source to avoid picking up audience noise or traffic noise for instance. Great for signal to noise ratio, not so good for sound quality – at least as we audiophiles expect it. All of that being said, I must admit that personally, I pretty much hate the sound of violins. 🤢😀There are very few violinists that I can say I really admire and listen to. Itzhak Perlman, Issac Stern, Anne Sophie Mutter to a name a few. What I’m saying is that there’s also some musicianship involved here. The second chair violinists are probably not producing sound of the same caliber as that of the aforementioned violinists. Add to that the most commonly used mic techniques, and the closeness of the mics to the performers, it easily compounds the sound quality problem. For recordings I listen to, I prefer the older, simpler two or three spaced mic technique used in the early Mercury Living Presence or RCA Living Stereo. Telarc also adapted this in their early digital recordings. Prof. Keith O. Johnson of Reference Recordings has made wonderful recordings. Also take a look at the library from BIS/Sweden. I think it’s also important to seek out the best rooms where these kinds of music/instruments/vocals are recorded. For example. I’ve discovered that many of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra recordings I love best were made at Chicago Medinah Temple, not Orchestra Hall (as may sometimes be misquoted). As a side note, I should also mention that often recordings that I’ve made that sound good on my system, are not necessarily all that listenable in a car, for instance. If I did whatever I need to do to make them more appealing in a car or on the radio it would most certainly compromise the dynamic range and sound quality (as I, and probably you prefer it). If all else fails – use the tone control!!!!!! You, as the listener, have literally no control over what the recording engineer did, mixing and mastering engineer did, the musician’s abilities, or where/how the recording was made. There is no such thing as “purist” here. Don’t be afraid to use the treble control to dial it down a bit, or a lot. Even boosting bass can alleviate some of that violin edginess. https://gewchorale.org/ https://www.renkus-heinz.com/application/chicagos-college-church-offers-a-landmark-ic-squared-installation/ https://bis.se/contact https://referencerecordings.com/
  11. I've tried playing some of my DSD/DSF files using the ROON player. I don't like what I'm hearing. And the "quality indicator" light is a small yellow dot. The Signal Path shows a lot of conversions, down-sampling and floating point conversion. My Endpoint is limited to 24/192. Is there any way to improve this? It seems like the lower quality signal path indicator and my ears agree. Is there any way for ROON to produce the highest quality at the Endpoint (amp/DAC) from a DSD file?
  12. I'm sure some of you remember the iconic "Chicago" song Lake Shore Drive by Aliotta Haynes & Jerimiah. Ted Aliotta is a personal friend of mine. I've played many gigs and jam sessions with Ted. In perusing for some jams to go to I found out Ted has incurred some major medical issues, resulting in hospitalization. (stroke, bleeding ulcers, now 80% blind). If you care to help out with the expenses, his niece Maggie has setup a GoFundMe account. FWIW, I think today or tomorrow is his (74th?) birthday. https://www.gofundme.com/f/ameage-ted-aliotta-medical-fundraiser?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link_all&utm_campaign=m_pd+share-sheet
  13. Not sure if we're allowed to do this. If not, Moderators, you know what to do. ☺️ If it gets removed, It's on YouTube. Just search the title.
  14. ROFLMFAO. You just can't admit it, can you. Let's go through this again. Class D amp = no "added input modulation chip" Class D amp = no "feedback chip" Class Z amp = "different method of controlling the switching modulation of the output devices" Class Z amp = "added input modulation chip" Class Z amp = DIGITAL "feedback chip" (yes, I'm correcting you) But to you they are the same thing and both Class D. If that's the case, we should just throw out all amplifier Classifications all together.
  15. Which is precisely why it is Class Z, as the the original inventors designated it.
  16. NO. You are the one who needs to open yourself to other possibilities. You *might* learn something instead of being so presumptuous yourself.
  17. Seriously guys, I've been on this Forum for 18 years and still have 900 points to go before my Forum Rank gets upgraded to the next level. I'm just tying to make as many posts as possible. (joke)
  18. What I said was virtually all Class D amps are not DIGITAL at all. The M32 is as close to true DIGITAL as it gets at the moment, other than requiring some kind of "analog" output to drive ANALOG speakes. Class D amps are NOT Direct Digital or Digital Feedback or Direct Digital Feedback amplifiers. However, the NAD/Zetex developed amplifiers are. Hence, the original, and I agree with it, designation Class Z
  19. Oh, excuse me? I most certainly will. Until you figure out (accept) that they are directly and completely interrelated you'll never even begin to understand, or comprehend, or experience what's possible. I sincerely mean that. And it's to your great advantage to pursue that if you really want to experience reproduced music at its best. Seriously.
  20. Afraid to fall into the trap, eh? (really, I know you don't understand what I'm getting at yet) Bottom line is this is all just semantics. No need to argue. In the end, it's all about implementation anyway, right? Just because an amplifier is analog, or digital, Class A or Class AB, SET or quasi-complimentary doesn't make it better than one of the others. So I'll break the news to you. Bruno Putzy authored that paper in 2006 well before DDFA was a commercially available product. And as far as "analog" goes, There really isn't such as thing. Electrons don't "flow" like water, through or along the skin of wires. The whole world is digital. Even time itself comes in "bits".
  21. Well, if you think so................ There really are no digital amplifiers https://www.hypex.nl/img/upload/doc/an_wp/WP_All_amps_are_analogue.pdf And after you're done reading that I have something else for you to look at.
  22. And like I said, you've never been in a recording studio, and I suspect , like almost all audiophiles, have little to no recording experience.
  23. And they (Class D linear amplifiers) are nothing close to a Direct Digital Feedback Amplifier either. You do realize that, don't you?
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