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coolroleplaying

Klipsch RP-250S Wall Mount Issue. Did You Find that Needle in the Haystack?

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I have Klipsch RP-250S Surround Speakers, and I'm unable to find any type of wall bracket. I've looked for hours on the Internet, and I'can't find any wall mounting bracket (needle in the haystack) that will fit my speaker without having to drill holes in it!

 

If you look at the photo you will see the speaker on the right needs to be rotated to the right at least 45 degrees, due to speaker being flush wall mounted. The speaker needs to twist to the left about 8 inches in other words, and match the positioning of the speaker closest in the photo.  

 

I've even contacted Klipsch support, and that wasn't any help. I'm unwilling to drill holes into my new surround sound speakers. Even the wall brackets that squeeze together aren't wide enough to fit the speaker. They only widen 11" and this speaker is 12" wide. 

20170924_165207.jpg

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I can only see the one picture but I assume there is no wall there ?.... so you want to face the speakers at each other.   

 

Stands are often used in your situation but yours are very high up the wall....how about lowering the other one and putting the one you want to rotate on a stand or putting both on stands...which solves your double door problem and lets you place them forward from the back wall.   Sound quality would be way better imo ☺

 

A more complicated  solution for you or a carpenter friend is to build a small shelf for it in that same spot and face it as you suggest.  It could also hang from the ceiling but that would be a complicated job imo and my first suggestion is far superior for audio quality.  

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The lowering of the speaker's is a great idea, but the one speaker that needs wall mounted adjusting won't allow for a stand. I believe now you can see that I don't have room room for a stand because this is a walk way between rooms. I do like your idea of making a stand for the speaker. Can I confirm though that you're stating surround speakers should only be about 6'  (5', 4') feet above the floor? 

Pic from hallwayspeakers.jpg

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They can be high, and will sound fine for many sounds going through the surrounds [e.g., wind, thunder, crickets, dogs barking in the distance, musical ambience, etc.).  Once in a while, though, a car might drive from the front to the rear of the room and will sound like it is driving up hill.   But, hey, maybe there is a hill there. 

 

Here is a picture of the rear of a room at Klipsch that has high surround speakers (Heresy IIs ?).  Note the Klipschorn in the rear corner, though.  I'll bet that brings the surround down to earth.

59c9a5d2b89e8_roompic.thumb.jpg.d1e36cfffe10871a03e6bf649258f104.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Both of the companies that came to my home recommended Klipsch, and mounting only the surround speakers higher up. I don't have to have them that high, but need to decide on the correct height soon. 

 

Here is another issue, if I move the speaker height lower, I don't have any more length in one cord. I do have 4' of the original cord left, so if I splice in the extra cord will it affect the sound quality? 

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38 minutes ago, coolroleplaying said:

Both of the companies that came to my home recommended Klipsch, and mounting only the surround speakers higher up. I don't have to have them that high, but need to decide on the correct height soon. 

 

Here is another issue, if I move the speaker height lower, I don't have any more length in one cord. I do have 4' of the original cord left, so if I splice in the extra cord will it affect the sound quality? 

No splicing won’t effect anything. Just do a good job of it and try to seal everything up tight to prevent oxidation. 

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Surrounds at a certain height come into better focus.  In a theater there are often multiple rows of seats and they are high to reach all seats.  In this living room its flexible but i think say 5 or 6 feet is ideal but whatever height i would want the one on a stand to match so i would look at stands and match the height to the stand.  Anything above ears is good and a little higher allows the whole room to hear them better.  If the couch is your main listening seat it really should come forward a few feet the wall will reflect a lot of sound at you.  

 

In the theater pic u can see how they tilted all the surrounds down to try and reach ears to compensate for the higher mounting.

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I didn't even bother looking for a bracket. I went to lowes and purchased a heavy duty screw that could hold the weight. I have 2-250's and 2-525's which are heavier. I ran cable through ceiling and made sure I left a few extra feet of wire. The way they hang on the screw gives them a small tilt down which works really good. I hung mine at 6'.


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Hey,

 

I have a similar offset positioning of surrounds as you. I will be installing RP 250Ss as RS, LS, RBS and RLS. However my RS is farther away than my LS (RS - 12 feet and LS - 8 feet approx). Since you already have it installed, I wanted to know if this affects the surround experience in anyway or would the Reciever's Audyssey tech suffice to compensate for this offset.

 

Thanks!

 

 

On 9/26/2017 at 5:54 AM, coolroleplaying said:

The lowering of the speaker's is a great idea, but the one speaker that needs wall mounted adjusting won't allow for a stand. I believe now you can see that I don't have room room for a stand because this is a walk way between rooms. I do like your idea of making a stand for the speaker. Can I confirm though that you're stating surround speakers should only be about 6'  (5', 4') feet above the floor? 

Pic from hallwayspeakers.jpg

 

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Thanks for the great ideas on how to best rotate and re-mount my RP-250S Surround Speaker, and here is what I finally did. I bought the $12 shelf, and $6 bracket from Home Depot. It took about 2 hours, due to rerunning the speaker wire lower (insulated wall) in the wall, patching holes, repainting. etc. Thanks for the suggestions about speaker height, and positioning. It sounds simply amazing!

 

NOTE: Both surround speakers are at the same height 6' 5", and both are directly across from each. The original photo seems to indicate they're not but in actuality there are directly across from each other, but I did have to lower the one 6" to equal the right one. 

 

Is there anyone here who is very familiar with the optimization of improving my Klipsch audio, Pioneer Elite, Panasonic Blu-ray, and LG TV? I believe I may already have most of it figured out, but there are a few lingering questions. The most important factor is reducing the serious echo problem I have due to cathedral ceiling (see photos). I already have a 3000 gram Flokati rug on the way, which is often used in commercial studio rooms.  I'm also thinking though that the wall with the surround speaker (right one) will need decorative acoustic wall panels. 

 

http://www.flokatirug.net

 

I have the following audio/video system;

Pioneer Elite Receiver VSX-LX302

Panasonic Blu-Ray Player DMP-UB900

Klipsch RP-280 Surround System ((2) RP-280F, (1) RP-450C, (2) RP-250S, (1) R-115SW)

LG OLED65G6P TV

All equipment is connected with HDMI 2.0, HDCP 2.2 cables, and ARC connected from TV to receiver. 

  • OLED65G6P

20171002_160126.jpg

Edited by coolroleplaying
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Improve your TV w a calibration disc.  Buy the spears and munsil one on amazon and be amazed that no tv is sent to a house properly calibrated.  30min to 1 hr to get 2x the picture.  Use it for all modes i.e. sports vivid standard etc.  Each is separate usually.

 

The echo is in part the couch at the back wall  (bad) but more generally the room and you need acoustic treatment to improve that.  Diy about 200 to 400 or from a supplier perhaps 500 to 1000 will get you to an incredible room.  You can even buy treatments with your photos or images added so the wife can choose and make the room really nice.  

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3 hours ago, coolroleplaying said:

Thanks for the great ideas on how to best rotate and re-mount my RP-250S Surround Speaker, and here is what I finally did. I bought the $12 shelf, and $6 bracket from Home Depot. It took about 2 hours, due to rerunning the speaker wire lower (insulated wall) in the wall, patching holes, repainting. etc. Thanks for the suggestions about speaker height, and positioning. It sounds simply amazing!

 

NOTE: Both surround speakers are at the same height 6' 5", and both are directly across from each. The original photo seems to indicate they're not but in actuality there are directly across from each other, but I did have to lower the one 6" to equal the right one. 

 

Is there anyone here who is very familiar with the optimization of improving my Klipsch audio, Pioneer Elite, Panasonic Blu-ray, and LG TV? I believe I may already have most of it figured out, but there are a few lingering questions. The most important factor is reducing the serious echo problem I have due to cathedral ceiling (see photos). I already have a 3000 gram Flokati rug on the way, which is often used in commercial studio rooms.  I'm also thinking though that the wall with the surround speaker (right one) will need decorative acoustic wall panels. 

 

http://www.flokatirug.net

 

I have the following audio/video system;

Pioneer Elite Receiver VSX-LX302

Panasonic Blu-Ray Player DMP-UB900

Klipsch RP-280 Surround System ((2) RP-280F, (1) RP-450C, (2) RP-250S, (1) R-115SW)

LG OLED65G6P TV

All equipment is connected with HDMI 2.0, HDCP 2.2 cables, and ARC connected from TV to receiver. 

  • OLED65G6P

20171002_160126.jpg

How funny, I was going to suggest making shelves earlier but didn't think that was what you were looking for. You even found the same decorative L braces I did. I used a floating shelf and reinforced with the braces for my RS52II's....looks great!

 

nOwTj0Bh.jpgqllqPq9h.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, RoboKlipsch said:

Improve your TV w a calibration disc.  Buy the spears and munsil one on amazon and be amazed that no tv is sent to a house properly calibrated.  30min to 1 hr to get 2x the picture.  Use it for all modes i.e. sports vivid standard etc.  Each is separate usually.

 

The echo is in part the couch at the back wall  (bad) but more generally the room and you need acoustic treatment to improve that.  Diy about 200 to 400 or from a supplier perhaps 500 to 1000 will get you to an incredible room.  You can even buy treatments with your photos or images added so the wife can choose and make the room really nice.  

 

Did I find the right disc? This is for blu-ray, but I have a 4K TV, so is it going to work?

https://www.amazon.com/Spears-Munsil-Benchmark-Calibration-Disc/dp/B00CKWI13O/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1506994474&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=calibration+disc+for+tv++spears+and+munsil

 

Can you be more specific on DIY acoustic treatment? Are there any posts with step-by-step instructions DIY acoustic treatments? 

Edited by coolroleplaying

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50 minutes ago, Tasdom said:

How funny, I was going to suggest making shelves earlier but didn't think that was what you were looking for. You even found the same decorative L braces I did. I used a floating shelf and reinforced with the braces for my RS52II's....looks great!

 

nOwTj0Bh.jpgqllqPq9h.jpg

 

Hey those shelf brackets look real familiar!

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12 hours ago, coolroleplaying said:

 

Did I find the right disc? This is for blu-ray, but I have a 4K TV, so is it going to work?

https://www.amazon.com/Spears-Munsil-Benchmark-Calibration-Disc/dp/B00CKWI13O/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1506994474&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=calibration+disc+for+tv++spears+and+munsil

 

Can you be more specific on DIY acoustic treatment? Are there any posts with step-by-step instructions DIY acoustic treatments? 

That is the right disc, i used it on my 4k tv and my 1080.  Be amazed!

 

Treatment is labor intensive but ez.  Ill find you a couple diy threads later today or tomorrow and give u an idea what u need.

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Do I need a diffusing panel or absorbing panel? I've found this site, but am unfamiliar with which of these 3 acoustic panel core options are best for my acoustic problem, which is a bad echoing due to the sound reflexion and cathedral ceilings:

 

https://www.acoustimac.com/acousticart/143201758/

 

Their 3 core options are:

 

Roxul Rockboard Core

EcoCore

OwensCorning 703

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1 hour ago, coolroleplaying said:

Do I need a diffusing panel or absorbing panel?

 

As I understand them, both will help with reflections.  Thick absorbing panels will attenuate or stop the reflections above the cut-off frequency of the panel.  Diffusing panels will prevent sharply focused reflections of sound hitting them from bouncing off in a straight line.  Rather, they make the sound spread out, so at any given point the sound hits after that (including both walls and your ears) it will be diffuse and not as loud.  Some are "hemispheric," i.e., spread out the sound more or less over 180 degrees in all directions, except where the wall they are mounted on is.   I use both types of panels, but sparingly.  Some reflections, especially complex ones, help make the room sound good, IMO.   I'd say don't swamp that cathedral ceiling with absorbing panels.  Whether you put them (and/or diffusing panels) on the wall or the ceiling, put up a few at a time, then listen for a good long time.  The second best home room I ever heard had a ceiling much like yours.  The best room had a large brick fireplace and beams and shelves that diffused the sound really well (of course it had a rug, as well).  Some people would try putting a row or two (a few panels at a time) of absorbing panels and diffusing panels on the ceiling alternating the order (absorbing--diffusing--absorbing on one sloped side of the ceiling, and diffusing--absorbing--diffusing on the other). 

 

Diffusing panels can be heavy, so screw them into ceiling joists or rafters (one and the same at your house??) in case of earthquake [only small areas of Texas and Montana are immune, and even they ... ].  Are your surround speakers attached to their shelves?  Since you don't want to put holes into them, museum putty might do.  Once we began to understand what LFE can really do, we stuck down all of the objets d'art in our library/theater with museum putty.

 

Does your AVR (or pre-pro) have a room EQ device?  Audyssey XT32 addresses the time domain a bit, while EQing the room and speakers.  They recommend getting the room as good as you can first, then trying their instrument.

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http://arqen.com/acoustics-101/room-setup-acoustic-treatment/

 

I find this to be one of the better primers.  There are many sites with info but beware reading on sites where they sell you foam.   Dont buy or use it except in rare circumstances.

 

Absorption is the go to physics for acoustic control.  Diffusion is equal and sometimes greater in quality but is tricky and has many requirements to function properly.  So absorption is how to begin.  It is easy and fun and very interesting.

 

Shortest version is covers near reflection points for all main seats with 2" or better yet 4" of rockwool 60.  Yes a space between the panel and wall is helpful but NOT critical.  Dont worry about it.

 

Bass traps or properly a broadband absorber in as many corners as you can afford aesthetically and financially.  You cannot have too many of these.  Its unlikely but possible to cover too many near reflection points but you cant have too many traps.  

 

I just added more.  I now have 12 2x4 traps and 18 or so near reflection panels  (2") in a L shaped room maybe 2300cft.  Its amazing.  Movie surround is so sharp and clear its a mini theater.

 

I can give advice if you post pictures of your room.  Any surface near a speaker or LP can be treated within reason its more what looks good and sounds great balanced.

 

If youd like to see pictures how to treat certain things or how to build just ask.

 

It is best to buy a few panels first to see pro quality.  Then learn DIY to do similar for 1/3 or even 1/4 the price....plus labor.

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