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garyrc

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About garyrc

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  • Location
    The Milky Way
  • My System
    Main room: 2- 1982 Klipschorns with K-401 fiberglass mid horn upgrade (1987), and AK-4 Klipschorn stock upgrade (2006), Modified Belle Klipsch (2005) center channel with K401 horn in an enlarged hihat, 2 NAD C- 272 ss 150 wpc stereo power amps, Marantz AV7005 AV preamp/processor, Heresy II surround speakers driven by 1/2 NAD C-272 and a Yamaha 135 wt amp, NAD C-542 CD player, OPPO BDP-93 CD/SACD/DVD/Blu-ray player, Klipsch RSW-15 subwoofer, for movies only, Panasonic projector, 130" true width 2.35:1 projection screen (141.3" diagonal).

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  1. No help from Klipsch!

    "... I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me ..." [from page 1 of the Great Gatsby]
  2. Bass Causing Low note Saxaphone Rattle.

    But be sure to turn the volume down above 250 Hz. A full range sweep is a good way to blow a tweeter, or perhaps a midrange.
  3. Please i need your help. new member here

    I believe the 150m has a sensitivity or 93 dB, 1M, 2.83v (please check this). If that is its sensitiviry, I would call it rather efficient, but not highly efficient. You have to take into consideration that you will be farther away than the 1 meter distance at which they test speakers. At 4 meters away, in a 3,000 to 4,000 cu.ft. room, it would take about 70 watts to safely produce 105 dB peaks encountered in reference level playback. Denon's specs may be misleading. They report 80 watts per channel into 8 ohms (20-20,000 Hz) at 0.08% THD, with two channels driven. You want the power rating with all channels driven. If you will be using 5 channels (your sub will power itself), it should be rated at 5, and if you use 7, it should be rated with 7 channels driven. More and more AVR manufacturers are less than candid in that way -- maybe, by now, it is all of them. The specs for separate power amps are usually more honest. An old rule of the thumb is that an AVR will deliver only about 80% of its 2 channel power to each of 7 channels channels (including the first two). In your case, that would be about 64 watts per channel. That's cutting it pretty fine. A lot depends on how loud you like it, and how far away you will be. If you want it to be as loud as it would be in a modern, well equipped commercial cinema, I wouldn't use that speaker/amp combination. If you sit close to the speakers, in a small room, they would probably be good.
  4. Bass Causing Low note Saxaphone Rattle.

    I can't think of anything in the FM chain that would be responsible for that. Can you describe the rattling a little more? I know it syncs with a bass note, but is it, itself in the bass, or is it higher? If it shows up (later) when you are listening to a disc, then it might be: A room or cabinet resonance, as RoboKlipsch said. We had to put a brace under a book shelf that resonated. Before we fixed it, it sounded like a giant giving a raspberry, with a little room shuttering in the background. If higher in pitch, a bad reed. I've heard a sort of rapid flopping sound in the extreme bass, once in a while. It didn't come from my Khorns, but the subwoofer, maybe.
  5. Any regrets buying a curved tv?

    LG Curved 4K UHD Smart LED TV - 105" Class This one might be large enough to increase immersiveness through a combination of a slight curve and a large size. It is 105," which, in TVspeak, means a 105" diagonal. Al right, a 104.6" diagonal.
  6. damsel in distress. can i mix reference lines?

    Welcome to the forum! Are you from across the pond? My only gripe with the advertising for the Denon AVR-X540BT is that it doesn't include a watts per channel rating with all channels operating. They rate it with a maximum of two channels operating, and with other fudge factors deployed. You want the figures for w.p.c. with all channels operating, 8 ohms, at low distortion. Search for a "bench test" of the Denon in a review. Denon is a good company, though. Having Audyssey is valuable, IMO. Do you intend to operate at full reference volume (the level you hear in a well equipped commercial cinema; very brief peaks through each main speaker of 105 db, with a normal level of about 75 to 85 dB), or at a lower "medium leve?." How far away from the main speakers will you be? What is your room volume in cubic feet? As to the speakers, given a 3 dB sensitivity difference, and a lower power handling rating, you may want to move up to the 160, or beyond. I would be nervous about running either of these models at reference level, unless your room is small. You will definitely need a good subwoofer to reduce the strain on the main speakers.
  7. Belle Klipsch..new to me

    I agree! Definitely not! When my Belle was out in the room, there was a little peak at 60 Hz, then a drop. When I flush mounted it, the - 3 dB point was at 40 Hz.
  8. PINK FLOYD

    Have you heard the SACD multi-channel version of Dark Side of the Moon? It is in Quad, and fairly hypnotic, with (I assume) or without the other hypnotic.
  9. Forte III lifts?

    I haven't seen any. The history guys in that section might know, as might someone reading this now. I know that PWK was shocked/angered by a negative review in some magazine that cited "no bass response" and gave data. PWK was unable to come up with bass that week until he put the speaker in question up on a stool (height unknown). I think so. I think something that might be called boundary effect would be reduced more on legs than on a solid stand (no cavity). As I understand it, if the bass is not reinforced as much by the floor, because the floor isn't there until farther down, the bass is attenuated. It used to be standard practice in movie theaters to fit the behind the screen speaker cabinets with thick, braced plywood "wings" on either side of the cabinets and above and below them, to reinforce bass. If the theater was the multipurpose type, with stage performances, too, the speaker cabinets would be on rollers to roll them out of the way, but the plywood extension of the baffle still went down in front of the rollers, to about one inch of the floor. If you have some lumber, you could tie or wedge a piece (firmly) to the front of the risers (back, too, if the Forte I has either a rear firing port or a passive radiator in the back), and see if it makes a difference. Or run REW, if you have it. If it does make a difference, you could permanently enclose the risers. Firmness is important. When we rebuilt a room, giving it firm walls instead of the floppy ones the former owner had put into his DIY project, it made an audible difference in the bass. Do you listen to music standing up, sitting down, or both? Are you going to finish that part of the basement? Over our studs, we put in 3/4 plywood sheeting covered by 5/8 sheetrock, with seams staggered and glue put between the layers, to prevent vibration. It made nice, firm walls. Good luck!
  10. JBL 590 vs Klipsch?

    I had the same reaction. Didn't the Aussie review measure the sensitivity at 90 dB? If so, I would characterize the sensitivity as "near average," rather than "high" as the reviewer did. If the true figure is 90, it would take about 128 true watts, at 13 feet, in a fairly large room, to produce film industry/home theater/Audyssey Reference Level Peaks of 105 dB through each of the main channels (not the sub, in a HT). Paul Klipsch thought one needs very brief peaks 10 dB higher (at 115 dB to reproduce the "blood stirring" levels of a full symphony orchestra, which he often recorded and measured as a kind of hobby). True, since these peaks are usually very brief, and amplifiers can pass these and recover, someone might get away with a amp of 64 watts, or so, i.e., 3 dB lower, but if you like it loud, there is a risk. If the true figure is 90 dB, then the Klipsch Heresy II, for instance, being 6 dB more sensitive, which would produce the 105 dB with only 32 watts (I don't know the sensitivity of the Heresy III). Another way to look at is that a Heresy II with a pretty standard 100 watt per channel amplifier would put out the same sound pressure level ("volume") as the JBL would at 400 watts. Don't get me wrong! I have had a decades long love affair with both JBL and Klipsch, my two favorite speaker companies.
  11. Any regrets buying a curved tv?

    A curved screen may increase the feeling of immersiveness if it is big enough. All true widescreen processes in cinema terms (an aspect ratio of 2:1 or greater; 16:9 doesn't qualify because it is only 1.78:1) were designed for at least slightly curved screens. CinemaScope (and it's successor, Panavision), were shown exclusively on sightly curved screens for the first decade, or so. The problem with curved TV screens is they are not common height, unless a 21:9 (2.33:1) can be configured that way, and they are not big enough. For size to help, I would think that the widescreen image would have to be at least 45 degrees wide, which would mean a projector and screen. In our HT, the perceived width is 47 degrees with a 130" true width screen from about 12.5 feet away. If we could have a built-in screen rather than a roll down, we would go curved in a minute. One of my favorite processes, 70 mm Todd-AO, used a significantly curved screen until it became clear that rival processes were mainly flat. In the halcyon days, people who liked to sit back got about 50 degrees, and people in the film buff seats, closer up, could get 70 degrees, or so. At 70 degrees, the effect was very immersive.
  12. Forte III lifts?

    If they are lifted by placing them on a solid object that has a firm surface across the front, sides and back it might be O.K. What you don't want is a cavity under them. Cavities (i.e. legs) reduce the deep bass. The only reason I can think of to raise them would be to get the tweeters to be at ear level. Most couches, etc are low enough so, as oldtimer says, the tweeters will be near enough to ear level. The Forte III was probably designed and voiced to be sitting on the floor. Another variable is what is behind the speakers. The guy in the video has a couple of windows behind the nice big passive radiators. Normal thin window glass doesn't contribute much to boundary gain (in the bass). Thicker glass, as in sliding glass doors, isn't so bad, unless the doors wiggle, which some do. Good, firm walls are the best of all. I hope the video guy's cat doesn't like to shred speaker cones, which some do. Those passive radiators look awfully tempting. One of the guys that used to be at Klipsch had a cat who ate the woofer surround. [I love cats; I'm on my 6th. They have always been banned from the music listening room, which meant they spent a great deal of time trying to sneak in there.] Did the video guy guess that the Forte I came out in the '70s? They were first manufactured in 1985, and got one of the best reviews ever in High Fidelity magazine. The following was written by Paul Klipsch: Eight Cardinal Points of Reproduction 1.Freedom from distrortion. Minimum distortion requires small amplitudes of air mass movements, even at peak transient power output. Bass diaphragm motion should not eceed 1/16 inch. Corner placement reduces distortion three fourths. 2.Optimum size of speaker. Large enough to reproduce the lowest audible bass tone at peak transient power output without distortion; not so large as to produce a separation of bass and treble events. Corner placement increases effective size of speaker 4 times. 3.Freedom from rattles. 4.Freedom from shadows. Obstructions between high frequency speaker and listeners can not be tolerated - treble wave-lengths do not turn corners. 5.Freedom from cavities. The space under a speaker box formed by mounting it on legs can destroy the bottom octave of response and deteriorate the next 2 octaves. 6.Adequate spacing for stereo. In a 14 x 17 foot room, for example, the 17-foot wall is apt to be best for the stereo speaker array. 7.Accurate spatial values. Ability to localize the virtual sound sources in their original spatial relationships requires 3 widely spaced speakers, regardless of size or type, retention of this quality over a wide listening area requires toe-in of the flanking speakers. 8.Flanking speakers toed-in. Such toe-in is naturally provided by corner speakers. The effect is to reduce shift of the virtual sound source for different listener locations. This is the only way to achieve a wide area for listening.
  13. Show us your great photography thread!

    Makes me homesick for the Bay Area.
  14. Welcome! You don't want a cavity under the Klipschorns. It's conceivable that even a 1 Inch cavity will reduce the bass. The (three?) metal nubs under the Klipschorn, which are very small, hold it nice and steady whether on a wood floor or a carpet (they will compress a carpet to the point at which in is no longer spongy, IMO. Khorns are very heavy, compared to many other speakers. The following was written by Paul W. Klipsch Eight Cardinal Points of Reproduction 1.Freedom from distortion. Minimum distortion requires small amplitudes of air mass movements, even at peak transient power output. Bass diaphragm motion should not exceed 1/16 inch. Corner placement reduces distortion three fourths. 2.Optimum size of speaker. Large enough to reproduce the lowest audible bass tone at peak transient power output without distortion; not so large as to produce a separation of bass and treble events. Corner placement increases effective size of the speaker 4 times. 3.Freedom from rattles. 4.Freedom from shadows. Obstructions between high frequency speaker and listeners can not be tolerated - treble wave-lengths do not turn corners. 5.Freedom from cavities. The space under a speaker box formed by mounting it on legs can destroy the bottom octave of response and deteriorate the next 2 octaves. 6.Adequate spacing for stereo. In a 14 x 17 foot room, for example, the 17-foot wall is apt to be best for the stereo speaker array. 7.Accurate spatial values. Ability to localize the virtual sound sources in their original spatial relationships requires 3 widely spaced speakers, regardless of size or type, retention of this quality over a wide listening area requires toe-in of the flanking speakers. 8.Flanking speakers toed-in. Such toe-in is naturally provided by corner speakers. The effect is to reduce shift of the virtual sound source for different listener locations. This is the only way to achieve a wide area for listening.
  15. Belle Klipsch..new to me

    Not good in earthquake country.
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