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-Russian-Spy-

low db listening on jubilee questions

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   I've got a few questions on lower decible listening on the Jubilee's.  I understand that the jubes perform quite well at lower db, I do have roommates so this aspect is very appealing. However I have a few questions regarding size, perception of volume, immersion, and directivity.  So let's say my current situation is listening to music at 80 db on Yamaha hs8 monitors in nearfield, if I were to be listening to jubes at the same decible, is it just a greater perception of immersion?  Would horns of that size move enough air that it would radiate into surrounding rooms at the same db of smaller speakers? Or can I get expect similar db to be transmitted through walls floors etc as my current nearfield setup?  Thoughts?

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I also wanted to ask about directivity of the bass bin, since most of the sound is being directed through the front, how much is radiating off the rear of the cabinet? Considering my current speakers are rear ported and close to a wall, would the horn be directing a majority of the sound into the room and be quieter on the other side of a wall?  Or would the cabinet itself radiate sound at a similar db to a ported speaker?

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I am probably the last one to step in here, but my comment would be that 80 dB is not exactly low level in my terms, which would be lower than that.

 

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Knowing that music is typically mixed and mastered at 83 dB at the listener's position, parlophone is right--that's not really "low level".  To me, low level is usually in the 60s dB.

 

5 hours ago, -Russian-Spy- said:

if I were to be listening to jubes at the same decible, is it just a greater perception of immersion?

This is a complicated question. I believe the bottom line is that Jubilees decouple from the nearby walls, floor, and ceiling until down to about 100 Hz, wherein the room corner itself becomes the last extension of the horn, i.e., the first quarter wavelength of sound at or below 100 Hz.  This is a definition of a corner horn.  Any loudspeaker placed within 1/4 wavelength of a room corner will couple to the room's boundaries--just like corner horns.  But corner horns will control their polar radiation pattern above ~100-800 Hz (depending on the corner horn design), whereas direct radiator loudspeakers will bathe the room in nearfield acoustic energy to much higher frequencies.

 

Jubilees have greater directivity control than any other loudspeaker that you've probably heard.  Will full-range directivity keep the sound levels down in adjacent rooms? No.  The reason why music sounds different inside rooms and interior spaces than it does outside is due to acoustic energy being reflected inside the enclosed space.  It's the time between sound creation and the following reflected acoustic energy from the room (a few milliseconds at most) that will be significantly affected by full-range directivity loudspeakers.  The human hearing system is very sensitive to short delay reflected acoustic energy--less than 0.7 milliseconds.  See the "precedence effect" or "Haas effect" for a more in-depth discussion of this subject.

 

If you want to play your music at whatever loudness you wish, any time of the day or night, without bothering others in adjacent rooms, over-the-ear headphones are the solution.  This is what they do.  They decouple the room acoustics from the ears. 

 

Chris

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Thanks @chris a , you've been super helpful.  My questions wern't directed towards listening at a higher volume per se,  but more at the size of the horns having a greater presence of sound effecting nearby rooms at the same decible as smaller nearfields.

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8 minutes ago, -Russian-Spy- said:

sound effecting nearby rooms at the same decible as smaller nearfields

 

The smaller nearfield speakers may have more distortion at the same comparable output level, therefore will be annoying to the people in the other rooms.

 

9 hours ago, -Russian-Spy- said:

my current speakers are rear ported and close to a wall,

 

The output from the rear firing port aimed at the wall is usually not good for people trying to fall asleep in the next room.

 

 

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Years ago, I took a decibel meter into the kids room to see exactly how loud I could get in the cave without being able to hear anything in the bedrooms.   With all the doors closed the tipping point was around 74-75 db which I felt was pretty decent considering how close we were.  I could push it to 80+ but then I was taking a chance on them waking up.   That was when I had Cornwalls but I might compare now that I have La Scalas.  Placement in the room makes a difference to the neighbors but there is only one best location in my room and I'm not going to make placement decisions based on how it sounds outside the room. 😜

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