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PrestonTom

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About PrestonTom

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  1. Building Cornwall from scratch for a friend.

    This is looking like a successful project! Congratulations
  2. WTB: Single Heresy

    UPDATE: I was not able to find Klipsch speakers at my price point, so I looked elsewhere. There was a killer deal on some Polk 10As listed on Craigslist. I picked them up and will do fine for my application. Thanks to all who contacted me. I appreciated your help. -Tom
  3. Vasubandu's Tower of Subwoofer Build

    I guess I take this hobby more seriously than others. Secondly, I am a cheap son of a gun and I hate to see others throw money away. Perhaps these are personal flaws ......
  4. Vasubandu's Tower of Subwoofer Build

    CECAA850 You have been saying all the right things. Unfortunately they have been falling on deaf ears. I also believe that design comes before buying parts. The problem is that a considerable amount of money is being thrown at the project. In my book, 1) getting a good low end response does not need to be expensive, and 2) two (decent) subs are better that one and that three are even better. All of this is being ignored. What is perplexing is that there a number of good simulation programs that can answer these "what if" questions without spending a dollar. Are they perfectly accurate? Nothing is perfect but that can narrow things down quite a bit.
  5. What Tweeter Component of Xover Goes Bad?

    The zener is not really required. It is there to provide some protection for the tweeter. The older designs did not even bother with them. Since the tweeter already has a 2nd order filter on it, you can eliminate the zener. However, do not do this if you are going to send huge (insane) amounts of power to your speaker.
  6. WTB: Single Heresy

    Hello Larry and thanks for the offer. I will hold off and see if I can get a complete speaker that is local, however I will keep your suggestion as a back up. -Tom
  7. The OP has multiple threads on this same topic and it is not practical to answer the same question in multiple threads. I will refrain.....
  8. Vasubandu's Tower of Subwoofer Build

    This was the driver I used in my sonotube project. It was a popular one and used by many folks. Dayton Audio RSS390HF-4 15" Reference HF Subwoofer 4 OhmPart # 295-468 As I recall, in a sealed box it needs about 5 cu ft and in a ported box it needs about 10 cu ft. There is freeware that is invaluable: Sonosub (or something like that) and WinISD.
  9. Vasubandu's Tower of Subwoofer Build

    One decision you need to make is whether you are okay with a ported design (rather then sealed). The other is how low does it need to go (realistically)?
  10. Vasubandu's Tower of Subwoofer Build

    The sonosub idea is a good one. However, you have not mentioned what your needs are. Is this for music or home theater and what sort of low frequency extension are you looking for? In my case, I used 18inch diam sonotube about 6 ft in length. This gave me a 10 cu ft volume with a hefty port (also sonotube). The half power point on mine is 17 Hz and a 100 watt amp will give a considerable SPL for my room. The 15 inch driver was less than $175 at Parts Express. It sounds like you have a more generous budget. If I might suggest, consider using those two drivers in separate cabinets. This lets you use room idiosyncrasies to your advantage by distributing them. Also, if I may, 24 inch drivers are a bit over the top in my opinion. Depending on what your design goals are, 15 inch drivers can do fine and save you a ton of money. Again, multiple subs are always a better idea. In either case, good luck with your project. -Tom
  11. WTB: Single Heresy

    I am looking for a single Heresy speaker (preferably Heresy 1). All drivers must be working and have an unmolested crossover. If there are problems with the cosmetics, that is okay. I am located in Southeast Connecticut and I would rather avoid shipping due to the added cost. The deal can be cash or maybe we can work out a trade possibly with cash. What could be part of a trade include: NAD tuner 4135 JBL 2445J 2 inch compression driver Marantz PMD 320 CD Player Polk 10A monitor speakers Behringer 2496 DCX DSP crossover (new in box). Let me know and send a PM with your offer Thanks, Tom
  12. Bifocal lens vs Progressive lens

    The default and least expensive material is plastic (CR 39). The next notch up is polycarbonate which is a bit more expensive and much lighter (thinner and a higher index). When I made that switch years ago, I did not notice any chromatic abnormalities. I really enjoyed the lighter weight and it turns out by the nature of the material they are impact resistant and block UV. My impression is the newer high index materials may not be that big of a step up in being lighter and thinner, but they are considerably more expensive. As far as the "anti-glare" coatings, there are different ones and at different price points. Such is life. The pretty advertisements at the eyeglass shop about what you will see (with and without the coating) are misleading, I asked one optician about this and he admitted that the coatings are better thought of as not being anti-glare, but rather as "anti-reflective" (IOW, the person you are talking to does not see themselves reflecting in your glasses, but their effect on driving on rainy night with headlights coming at you is minimal). I get the impression that some of anti-reflective coatings are more prone to scratching. Not surprisingly, the more expensive ones have better anti-scratch components. I am meticulous and careful about this stuff, so I have not picked up any scratches in typical use with the cheaper versions. In either case, if they drop and slide along the ground all of them will scratch. I will let you figure out how I know this fact.
  13. Bifocal lens vs Progressive lens

    Coyote, I am sorry you arm is in a sling. Without a doubt there is a story behind it. I remember the first time I got my progressives, I was amazed although it took a bit of getting used to (basically you need to move your head rather than moving your eyes). EXCEPT ..... the first time i went down the stairs. I moved my eyes to see my feet hitting the steps. WRONG ...... I nearly fell down the steps. In the end, I learned quickly. Hope your arm is is recovering quickly. -Tom
  14. Bifocal lens vs Progressive lens

    I was told that most of the online retailers do not ask for a Seg Height when ordering, although they may ask whether you wear glasses on top or down a bit from the top of your nose. In either case, they assume the pupil will center at the mid vertical distance of the lens. You are correct, that Seg Height is absolutely specific for a particular frame (since they frequently differ from one another since the vertical distance on the frame is a function of which frame you select). Seg Height, of course, can not be part of the prescription since the optometrist can not predict ahead of time what frames you will be selecting. It will be measured by the optician, along with PD, when the order is sent (along with the script) to the lab. My guess is that individual differences between the two eyes on a given person are swept under the rug by the retailer. I am not entirely negative about this. The PD can be measured and will work across all frames. If the script is not a strong one (as in my case), small errors should not be too much of a problem (I am told). The big deal is that the online prices can be substantially cheaper ..... substantially!
  15. Bifocal lens vs Progressive lens

    Let's be clear. When your eyes are measured by an ophthalmologist or optometrist, they will provide the spherical, axis, etc. The PD is seldom on that prescription. When you take that script to the optical shop, they will help you find frames. Once you have committed, then they will measure your PD. Yes, the PD along with the script is required to make the eyeglasses. They are reluctant to let you know what your PD is since you can avoid the optical shop and go and order online where the prices are much cheaper. If you were fortunate enough to be given your PD, then you are lucky. However that is not typical.
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