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Coytee

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Coytee last won the day on July 4 2016

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About Coytee

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    Klipsch Forum Lifer
  • Birthday 04/11/1960

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    Knoxville, TN

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  1. Well, Mr. Vain Showoff..... I personally don't think you should feel/think that way. True, only a handful of non-vain, non-showoff people on this forum do NOT have K402's.... because everyone else that does....is a fellow vain showoff. So, grab your showoff speaker....your showoff hole saw..... your showoff drivers and showoff hardware (no doubt gold plated) and strut your stuff cause, you're in for a treat! The real thing that I like about your comments is simply.....your comments. Though there is a number of people that have owned/heard the 402's there is probably a much much larger number of people who've never heard them so having another convert is a good thing! Take lots of pictures and be as vain as you can while you document your process! Now that I've beaten it into the ground, you can drop it from your vocabulary.
  2. Hmmm.....so, that would be similar to ordering a perfectly cooked piece of steak..... and cutting it up into pieces? Somehow, they both make sense!!
  3. Measure twice....cut once!
  4. I look at it this way.... (and obviously I wasn't there in the beginning) But...."in the beginning" PWK designed the Khorn with how many years of experience building horns? My guess is zero. Made something pretty cool and it developed into a nice company. 50 years later he (and Roy) set out to essentially re-create the Khorn as per his original thoughts... a 2-way speaker. However, THIS time he's been noodling around with speakers & horns for several years.... and has some tricks he's learned along the way up his sleeve. Having heard both, it's no surprise to me that the Jubilee might (does) outperform the Khorn.
  5. Coytee

    FAV CAR THAT YOU OWNED

    Regarding the 3-speed.... Car had enough power to take off in 3rd gear (flat surface) and simply keep going. Yeah it was a slow start.... Only tried it 2-3 times ever. When I was in college, I'd noticed the car blubbered a bit when opening up the throttle. 2nd gear would max out somewhere around 45 maybe , maybe 50 but you just felt there was more there. Pulled the carb off and on the kitchen table, rebuilt it. Turns out the screw(s?) that held the butterflys for the secondary ports....was loose. As I tightened the screws, the butterfly changed its angle becoming more straight when at full throttle (instead of acting as a quasi-choke) VERY intrigued, I got things put back together and couldn't wait.... jumped in car and took off. New breath was born! Now the car would hit almost 65 in 2nd gear and still be strong getting there. Yeah, that was a fun car. I "could get" as low as 8 MPG if I was smiling while driving. I could also get maybe 12/13 (if I recall) if I was driving in a boring fashion. 8 MPG was much more fun.
  6. Coytee

    FAV CAR THAT YOU OWNED

    I have/had two. 1971 Olds 442 convertible. 455 up front with a Hurst 3 speed (which always intrigued me as to why not 4). 1969 Mercedes 280 SL. Never really understood that car until I drove to Ohio once. The 442 was all about a lot of power and having it NOW. The 280 being a much smaller engine didn't have that kind of torque. Going to Ohio once, late at night, highway near to myself.....I opened it up a bit and THEN I realized that it didn't have any low end grunt but that engine would spin more like a turbine and that car would just scoot. So when I'm out with the guys, we're all in the 442. When I'm out with a gal....it's the 280. Both fun cars.
  7. lol, I forgot about the water I had while in Jacksonville. Blech is polite.
  8. Regarding taxes.... this year we owed a bit (darn those stocks that went up and were sold!!) So for me there was no refund, no delay..... did my taxes, sent in a payment and was done. Now, if you are meaning a delay with regard to the stimulus checks.....yes. Those seemed different. The first round came (for my wife and myself) deposited into my bank. Got them pretty quick. The second round did seem to take forever and that was a paper check that was mailed to me verses electronically deposited. Regarding water bottles.....I totally get that too. We recycle what paper, plastics, metals we can.
  9. Hmm... being a bit of a skeptic...I did more googling. Turns out Hamilton water is listed a number of times indeed. https://berkeleyspringswatertasting.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Winners91-2019.pdf
  10. As a practical matter, I don't and never have. Where I live, I'm on a well and frankly, it tastes pretty good. Every now & then I'll get a tinge of something in it....or a faint odor... None the less, out of the ground and through a filter, it's pretty good. When I was growing up, one thing that I noticed was that the water in the town was good. You didn't really notice this until you went somewhere else..... seemed anywhere else.....seemed that EVERYWHERE else you went, the water didn't taste as good. This isn't an old fogie having fond memories of his childhood.... these were actual comments that you'd make or hear others make. There was always a nice feeling about getting home and having a good drink of water. In college years, I went to Colorado. I don't recall if this was in Aspen or Snowmass.... but I distinctly recall going to dinner.... chugging down a big glass of water and stopping in my tracks saying to the company that this water was as good as home!!! Couple years ago, I went back to hometown for a reunion. During the reunion, the gal that organized it made sure to tell those that came in from out of town that she had a cooler full of Hamilton Bottled Water. She said something about it being award winning. I hadn't really thought about it....but made sure to go grab one and indeed, it tasted good. I grabbed a couple more bottles to bring home with me. I was back there a different time and wanted to find the bottled water and let's just say that it was a total fail. Being the ever curious and persistent type.... I dug into it a bit more and viola!!! I found where they do have some awards (who on earth has water tasting competitions???) Maybe it was a group of municipalities who all wanted to give each other badges so they could advertise... I don't know. None the less, found out that for essentially $15/case (1-case being 24, 16oz bottles) I could have some delivered to me. I jumped on it and ordered three cases yesterday. I'm going to replace the water the wife uses in her fancy schmancy Jura coffee maker to see if she notices anything. If you like bottled water but don't care for the various tastes that are in that water.... I'm here to tell you that you've blown $15 on much more irrelevant items.... I personally can't wait to get this. I don't recall the gals name, but I called 513-785-7428 to order some and spoke with a nice gal who splits her work time between this and another (physical) location. I had tried twice before and got her answering machine. I was tickled to get some ordered.... and read the (bold) part below and thought that was interesting so thought I'd share this. For full disclosure, I just now did a google search on Knoxville Bottled Water and see a reference that East Tennessee water was once voted best in world.... (I just love those grandiose prizes.... does that mean that water from the Swiss mountains sucks?? Does it really have to be the world?) Interestingly, growing up, Cincinnati water always sucked....and below says they draw from the same source. That's perplexing. Hamilton's “Best in the World” Tap Water Good For Business By Rod Hissong Ohio PUBLISHED 1:50 PM ET Jun. 12, 2019 HAMILTON, Ohio – There is something in the water in Hamilton. Hamilton's tap water is a multiple award winner at the Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting competition Chlorine dioxide is used at the end of the treatment process to remove the smell and taste of chlorine Hamilton on Tap is the bottled version of the water Specifically, it's chlorine dioxide – a mixture of chlorine gas and sodium chlorite. A complex process that's added to the tap water at Hamilton's Water Treatment Plant on River Road in Fairfield. Drawing water from the massive Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer the tap water that the city of Hamilton produces is multi-award winning. Since 2009, it's been named best in the world and best in the U.S. on multiple occasions at the annual Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting competition. It's also been named best in the state multiple times by the Ohio chapter of the American Water Works Association. “When you compete with the best of the best, you know, and you win it really says something about your water system,” said John Bui, Hamilton Water Production Superintendent. The process of adding chlorine dioxide is not a secret, or uncommon. But getting the mix of chlorine gas and sodium chlorite just right takes knowledge and analytics expertise. “It's a more sophisticated disinfectant system that requires a lot of knowledge to manage the generator that produces chlorine dioxide.” Chlorine dioxide cannot be purchased and transported on public roads, so the components have to made on site. The process helps eliminate the smell and taste of chlorine in the water, a common complaint about city water across the U.S. Hamilton's water treatment plant can produce 40 million gallons of water per day. On average, it produces about 16 million gallons – eight for the city and eight for eastern Butler County. By 2026, according to Bui, all of Butler County will purchase its water from Hamilton. The additional service will push the plants daily output to between 24 and 26 million gallons per day. Bui says the aquifer the plant sits above is a gold mine for water. Fairfield and the city of Cincinnati also have treatment plants that draw water from the aquifer. The high-quality H20 is also good for business. Municipal Brew Works in downtown Hamilton is in its third year of operation. At capacity, head brewer and MBW co-founder Sean Willingham said expansion is in the near future, but only if they can use Hamilton's water. “We're looking at doing a production facility, but it has to be on this water source,” Willingham told Spectrum News 1. “I want this water for my beer.” Willingham said a lot of brewers have to use a process with their water source known as reverse osmosis. They also, sometimes, have to add salt to their beer to get the balance to make a solid product. But MBW doesn't have to do that. He also said using any other water source would change the taste of his beer. In 1991, MillerCoors opened a brewery in Trenton in eastern Butler County. The facility employs around 500 people and produces approximately 11 million barrels of a beer per year, according to the company's website. MillerCoors uses water from the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer - the same aquifer Hamilton pulls water from. Hamilton also bottles some of its tap water. Bui said last year the plant bottled 120,000 bottles. Some of its is sold to local hospitals, and used for special events, like weddings. The manual process is labor-intensive so the city doesn't use it as a major revenue source. Recently, 100 cases of Hamilton tap water were sent to tornado victims in Dayton. Hamilton On Tap, the name affectionately given to the bottled water, has been sent to disaster areas all over the world, according to Bui. Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting 2018 - 2nd place for Best Municipal Water 2018 - 5th for Best Purified Water (Hamilton On Tap) 2018 - 3rd Place for People's Choice for Best Purified Water (Hamilton On Tap) 2017 - 3rd place for Best Municipal Water 2015 - 1st place for Best Municipal Water 2014 - 2nd place for Best Municipal Water 2013 - 5th place for Best Purified Water (Hamilton On Tap) 2010 – Best in the World for Best Municipal Water 2009 – Best in the United States for Municipal Water Several other Ohio cities have also won awards in the West Virginia-based Berkeley Springs competition, including: Montpelier, Kent, St. Henry, Sandusky, and Willoughby. Hamilton's “Best in the World” Tap Water Good For Business By Rod Hissong Ohio PUBLISHED 1:50 PM ET Jun. 12, 2019 HAMILTON, Ohio – There is something in the water in Hamilton. Hamilton's tap water is a multiple award winner at the Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting competition Chlorine dioxide is used at the end of the treatment process to remove the smell and taste of chlorine Hamilton on Tap is the bottled version of the water Specifically, it's chlorine dioxide – a mixture of chlorine gas and sodium chlorite. A complex process that's added to the tap water at Hamilton's Water Treatment Plant on River Road in Fairfield. Drawing water from the massive Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer the tap water that the city of Hamilton produces is multi-award winning. Since 2009, it's been named best in the world and best in the U.S. on multiple occasions at the annual Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting competition. It's also been named best in the state multiple times by the Ohio chapter of the American Water Works Association. “When you compete with the best of the best, you know, and you win it really says something about your water system,” said John Bui, Hamilton Water Production Superintendent. The process of adding chlorine dioxide is not a secret, or uncommon. But getting the mix of chlorine gas and sodium chlorite just right takes knowledge and analytics expertise. “It's a more sophisticated disinfectant system that requires a lot of knowledge to manage the generator that produces chlorine dioxide.” Chlorine dioxide cannot be purchased and transported on public roads, so the components have to made on site. The process helps eliminate the smell and taste of chlorine in the water, a common complaint about city water across the U.S. Hamilton's water treatment plant can produce 40 million gallons of water per day. On average, it produces about 16 million gallons – eight for the city and eight for eastern Butler County. By 2026, according to Bui, all of Butler County will purchase its water from Hamilton. The additional service will push the plants daily output to between 24 and 26 million gallons per day. Bui says the aquifer the plant sits above is a gold mine for water. Fairfield and the city of Cincinnati also have treatment plants that draw water from the aquifer. The high-quality H20 is also good for business. Municipal Brew Works in downtown Hamilton is in its third year of operation. At capacity, head brewer and MBW co-founder Sean Willingham said expansion is in the near future, but only if they can use Hamilton's water. “We're looking at doing a production facility, but it has to be on this water source,” Willingham told Spectrum News 1. “I want this water for my beer.” Willingham said a lot of brewers have to use a process with their water source known as reverse osmosis. They also, sometimes, have to add salt to their beer to get the balance to make a solid product. But MBW doesn't have to do that. He also said using any other water source would change the taste of his beer. In 1991, MillerCoors opened a brewery in Trenton in eastern Butler County. The facility employs around 500 people and produces approximately 11 million barrels of a beer per year, according to the company's website. MillerCoors uses water from the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer - the same aquifer Hamilton pulls water from. Hamilton also bottles some of its tap water. Bui said last year the plant bottled 120,000 bottles. Some of its is sold to local hospitals, and used for special events, like weddings. The manual process is labor-intensive so the city doesn't use it as a major revenue source. Recently, 100 cases of Hamilton tap water were sent to tornado victims in Dayton. Hamilton On Tap, the name affectionately given to the bottled water, has been sent to disaster areas all over the world, according to Bui. Berkeley Springs International Water Tasting 2018 - 2nd place for Best Municipal Water 2018 - 5th for Best Purified Water (Hamilton On Tap) 2018 - 3rd Place for People's Choice for Best Purified Water (Hamilton On Tap) 2017 - 3rd place for Best Municipal Water 2015 - 1st place for Best Municipal Water 2014 - 2nd place for Best Municipal Water 2013 - 5th place for Best Purified Water (Hamilton On Tap) 2010 – Best in the World for Best Municipal Water 2009 – Best in the United States for Municipal Water Several other Ohio cities have also won awards in the West Virginia-based Berkeley Springs competition, including: Montpelier, Kent, St. Henry, Sandusky, and Willoughby.
  11. I'll keep your secret that their green blood is the secret ingredient for your hot sauces...
  12. https://www.foxnews.com/science/trillions-of-cicadas-about-to-emerge-across-us Sifting through a shovel load of dirt in a suburban backyard, Michael Raupp and Paula Shrewsbury find their quarry: a cicada nymph. And then another. And another. And four more. In maybe a third of a square foot of dirt, the University of Maryland entomologists find at least seven cicadas -- a rate just shy of a million per acre. A nearby yard yielded a rate closer to 1.5 million. CICADAS LIVING UNDERGROUND FOR PAST 17 YEARS TO EMERGE IN THESE STATES THIS SUMMER And there's much more afoot. Trillions of the red-eyed black bugs are coming, scientists say. Within days, a couple weeks at most, the cicadas of Brood X (the X is the Roman numeral for 10) will emerge after 17 years underground. There are many broods of periodic cicadas that appear on rigid schedules in different years, but this is one of the largest and most noticeable. They’ll be in 15 states from Indiana to Georgia to New York; they’re coming out now in mass numbers in Tennessee and North Carolina. When the entire brood emerges, backyards can look like undulating waves, and the bug chorus is lawnmower loud. A cicada nymph is seen in an emergence tunnel in a shovel of dirt in a suburban backyard in Columbia, Md., Tuesday, April 13, 2021. America is the only place in the world that has periodic cicadas that stay underground for either 13 or 17 years, says entomologist John Cooley of the University of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) The cicadas will mostly come out at dusk to try to avoid everything that wants to eat them, squiggling out of holes in the ground. They’ll try to climb up trees or anything vertical, including Raupp and Shrewsbury. Once off the ground, they shed their skins and try to survive that vulnerable stage before they become dinner to a host of critters including ants, birds, dogs, cats and Raupp. It’s one of nature’s weirdest events, featuring sex, a race against death, evolution and what can sound like a bad science fiction movie soundtrack. Some people may be repulsed. Psychiatrists are calling entomologists worrying about their patients, Shrewsbury said. But scientists say the arrival of Brood X is a sign that despite pollution, climate change and dramatic biodiversity loss, something is still right with nature. And it’s quite a show. FLORIDA KEYS TO SEE RELEASE OF FIRST GENETICALLY MODIFIED MOSQUITOES Raupp presents the narrative of cicada’s lifespan with all the verve of a Hollywood blockbuster: "You’ve got a creature that spends 17 years in a COVID-like existence, isolated underground sucking on plant sap, right? In the 17th year these teenagers are going to come out of the earth by the billions if not trillions. They’re going to try to best everything on the planet that wants to eat them during this critical period of the nighttime when they’re just trying to grow up, they’re just trying to be adults, shed that skin, get their wings, go up into the treetops, escape their predators," he says. A cicada nymph sits on the ground, Sunday, May 2, 2021, in Frederick, Md. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) "Once in the treetops, hey, it’s all going to be about romance. It’s only the males that sing. It’s going to be a big boy band up there as the males try to woo those females, try to convince that special someone that she should be the mother of his nymphs. He’s going to perform, sing songs. If she likes it, she’s going to click her wings. They’re going to have some wild sex in the treetop. "Then she’s going to move out to the small branches, lay their eggs. Then it’s all going to be over in a matter of weeks. They’re going to tumble down. They’re going to basically fertilize the very plants from which they were spawned. Six weeks later the tiny nymphs are going to tumble 80 feet from the treetops, bounce twice, burrow down into the soil, go back underground for another 17 years." "This," Raupp says, "is one of the craziest life cycles of any creature on the planet." America is the only place in the world that has periodic cicadas that stay underground for either 13 or 17 years, says entomologist John Cooley of the University of Connecticut. The bugs only emerge in large numbers when the ground temperature reaches 64 degrees. That’s happening earlier in the calendar in recent years because of climate change, says entomologist Gene Kritsky. Before 1950 they used to emerge at the end of May; now they’re coming out weeks earlier. University of Maryland entomologists Michael Raupp and Paula Shrewsbury turn a shovel of dirt to pick out cicada nymphs in a suburban backyard in Columbia, Md., Tuesday, April 13, 2021. The cicadas will mostly come out at dusk to try to avoid everything that wants to eat them, squiggling out of holes in the ground. They’ll try to climb up trees or anything vertical. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) Though there have been some early bugs In Maryland and Ohio, soil temperatures have been in the low 60s. So Raupp and other scientists believe the big emergence is days away -- a week or two, max. Cicadas who come out early don’t survive. They’re quickly eaten by predators. Cicadas evolved a key survival technique: overwhelming numbers. There’s just too many of them to all get eaten when they all emerge at once, so some will survive and reproduce, Raupp says. This is not an invasion. The cicadas have been here the entire time, quietly feeding off tree roots underground, not asleep, just moving slowly waiting for their body clocks tell them it is time to come out and breed. They’ve been in America for millions of years, far longer than people. When they emerge, it gets noisy -- 105 decibels noisy, like "a singles bar gone horribly, horribly wrong," Cooley says. There are three distinct cicada species and each has its own mating song. Video They aren’t locusts and the only plants they damage are young trees, which can be netted. The year after a big batch of cicadas, trees actually do better because dead bugs serve as fertilizer, Kritsky says. People tend to be scared of the wrong insects, says University of Illinois entomologist May Berenbaum. The mosquito kills more people than any other animals because of malaria and other diseases. Yet some people really dread the cicada emergence, she said. "I think it’s the fact that they’re an inconvenience. Also, when they die in mass numbers they smell bad," Berenbaum says. "They really disrupt our sense of order." CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP But others are fond of cicadas -- and even munch on them, using recipes like those in a University of Maryland cookbook. And for scientists like Cooley, there is a real beauty in their life cycle. "This is a feel-good story, folks. It really is and it’s in a year we need more," he says. "When they come out, it’s a great sign that forests are in good shape. All is as it is supposed to be."
  13. If these are your practice runs to deal with your learning curve, it will be nice to see what challenge is ahead of you when you're done with it.
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