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wuzzzer

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Everything posted by wuzzzer

  1. Here's the same receiver from the same seller but its $20 less. [] http://cgi.ebay.com/HARMAN-KARDON-AVR-335-7-1-HOME-THEATER-RECEIVER_W0QQitemZ280103195567QQihZ018QQcategoryZ39794QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
  2. The B2 or S2 speakers are usually recommended as surround speakers with F2 front mains.
  3. If your speakers or electronics are picking up interference you'll hear it as the sound of hiss coming from the speakers when your receiver is on but no sound is being played through the speakers. Again, it is very likely that your receiver was designed to run the little speakers that come with the surround package and they might not even be putting out the entire 20Hz to 20kHz spectrum of humanly audible sound. I would say its a safe bet that even if you went out and bought a cheap $100-150 receiver you'll notice a big difference from what you have right now.
  4. In case you didn't see my answer at your other post: The quality of the source (such as the CD player you're using) and the quality of the amplification will affect the sound quite a bit. Also, the room they are in will make a huge impact on the sound you hear as well. How far apart are the speakers? How close to side or rear walls do you have them? How close do you sit to them? Your Philips HTIB's receiver is probably made to specifically drive the speakers it came with, not high quality speakers. Your next step should be to look for a good quality receiver. CDs are also recorded differently as well. Some are great recordings, some are very poor.
  5. The quality of the source (such as the CD player you're using) and the quality of the amplification will affect the sound quite a bit. Also, the room they are in will make a huge impact on the sound you hear as well. How far apart are the speakers? How close to side or rear walls do you have them? How close do you sit to them? Your Philips HTIB's receiver is probably made to specifically drive the speakers it came with, not high quality speakers. Your next step should be to look for a good quality receiver. CDs are also recorded differently as well. Some are great recordings, some are very poor.
  6. The HD in HD radio doesn't stand for high definition, it stands for Hybrid Digital.
  7. My SVS PC-Plus 16-46 puts out the deepest bass I've ever heard/felt from any home sub.
  8. It might be your ears getting used to the setup.
  9. HDMI carries video and audio in a digital format. With your current setup, I believe the way you'll have to hook everything up is component video to the TV (or to the receiver and then to the TV if you want your receiver to be able to switch video sources) and then either 6 channel analog wires or digital output to the receiver. If your player allows, you could also run the HDMI from the DVD player to the receiver and use that for audio only, and then component video from the DVD player to the TV. Or you could just buy a new TV and make everything much easier on us. []
  10. In a surround sound setup ideally you want the speakers to all blend with each other as perfectly as possible. In most surround setups, compromises are made in that area due to several reasons. The ideal setup would be to have 5 or 7 or however many speakers you need to be identical to each other. That being said, you would have a very nice setup if you went with 5 RB-61 speakers. The horns on Klipsch speakers definitely give more detailed sound and certainly are a more efficient design so that allows your amplifier/receiver to not have to push as many watts through them to get them very loud. If you're worried about the center channel, the RC-52 or 62 might be a good choice if you have space limitations and have to lay an RB-61 on its side.
  11. Hey, my friend has the Denon 1803 running RF-7s and it works great with them! Don't be ashamed of your setup, at least its Klipsch! If you want new speakers, I think you're on track with the RF-62s as they will allow you to build on them for a killer setup in the future. Otherwise if you don't mind the thrill of the hunt for 'vintage' Klipsch, a pair of Heresy or Forte speakers might fit the bill at the $600 range.
  12. He tells everyone to have a 'blessed day.' We would if he would stop posting on here! [A]
  13. For what its worth I went from an RF-7 + SVS sub system to a Forte II + SVS sub system and don't regret it for one minute. That being said, I did like how the RF-83 system sounded at Ultimate Electronics. There's just something about a midrange horn though...[8]
  14. A dB meter will help you adjust the level of your subwoofer and your other speakers so that they are all playing at roughly the same dB level from the listening position. Most modern receivers have test tones that will play one speaker at a time so that you can write down what the dB meter says for each speaker and then you can make adjustments on the receiver. Keep in mind that differences of only a few inches can change the dB output that you perceive to hear by quite a bit. It probably would work best to hold the meter right by your ears or in front of your nose so that you get the most accurate level reading for where you're sitting.
  15. QSC is a company who makes some serious amps that are mainly for professional use but can many times be used in home applications for power hungry speakers such as RF-7s. Their PLX series seems to be the best for home use. Every now and then someone on here sells one and you can also find them on eBay or probably AudiogoN.
  16. SAE 5000 Impulse Noise Reduction, DBX 1BX Dynamic Range Expander, Soundcraftsman SE450 10 Band EQ Think you have enough distortion in there now? []
  17. Actually the RF-7 drops down to around 2.8 ohms at a couple points across the frequency spectrum. I'd advise in not re-wiring anything since they are a very difficult speaker for most amps to drive right out of the box. The ohm rating of a speaker is not a linear rating that stays the same at all frequencies, most speakers have huge peaks and valleys in their ohm resistance from single digits to over 100 ohms.
  18. To answer your last part, turn the gain on the sub to max and the crossover point as high as it can go, not as low as it can go. Then let your receiever handle the rest.
  19. Do I know you from the SHOForum? []
  20. Peak wattage is just that, the highest level of wattage input that a speaker can handle for short bursts of sound. I'm assuming that your new receiver sounds louder/better to you? Since you're doubling the peak output watts you're going to typically get at least 3 decibels more sound. Also if your receiver is running in 6 ohm instead of 8 ohm it is 'working harder' because of the lower ohm rating (this will be affected by the ohm rating of your speakers as well, though). Different receiver/amp brands will have different ways they measure their peak output, too. Some will measure peak output at 1kHz which is a frequency that is pretty darn easy for any amplifier to drive so generally they can put out a lot of watts at that frequency. Typically the receivers that give you a true idea of their power capability are ones that display their highest wattage output across the 20Hz-20kHz spectrum.
  21. One of the things to make sure of is to get a pair of cables that are shielded and that you install them with the arrow pointing the correct way. (From the source to the amp).
  22. From what I've heard others say and experienced myself in an in-store demo is that the new Reference series (RF-83, 82, etc) speakers are smoother overall than the previous ones (RF-7, 5, etc). What are you using for your components? Your source and your receiver/amp will play a large part in how your speakers sound.
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