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Jim Naseum

"Encryption -- A Right of Privacy?"

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We know quantum computers can hack such things with ease, and we know that they've developed to pretty high levels.

Quantum computers can solve the encryption, but first you have to get in the front door, and that door has been booby-trapped. You can't use brute force password guessing. After a mere 10 tries it blows up the phone. There are 10,000 possible passwords.  

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I advise most of you to seek help for your narcissism--99% of you are very boring people. I’d rather Keep Up with the Kardashians than spy on you. If elected, counseling will be available to you. I will not raise your taxes...of course their will be a usage fee to attend this mandatory counseling. If you’re unable to pay this usage fee, you can pay off this debt by helping the Mexicans build that wall. 

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We know quantum computers can hack such things with ease, and we know that they've developed to pretty high levels.

Quantum computers can solve the encryption, but first you have to get in the front door, and that door has been booby-trapped. You can't use brute force password guessing. After a mere 10 tries it blows up the phone. There are 10,000 possible passwords.  

 

 

Correction. They say quantum computers can do such hacking, but it has never been done.  Isn't the best a quantum computer can do so far something like 5 x 3?

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They say quantum computers can do such hacking, but it has never been done.

 

They who?  Rather doubt skunk works and such have simply ceased to function, and to date we've found out about projects done 10 year or more earlier.

 

Dave

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Is a Quantum better than a Dell or an HP?

 

It comes with a processor capable of addressing 256k of ram.

Edited by Jeff Matthews

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They say quantum computers can do such hacking, but it has never been done.

 

They who?  Rather doubt skunk works and such have simply ceased to function, and to date we've found out about projects done 10 year or more earlier.

 

Dave

 

 

You'd have to show me something.  The last I heard, it was doing 3 x 5.  

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What follows is just my opinion... I am also a software developer...

 

Let's just say that our government would never violate our privacy without the legal and Constitutional means of doing so... I'll let the reader decide if they would believe that.

 

One of the biggest secrets our government EVER held was the design of the thermonuclear weapon. Yet, it was stolen and given to our enemies by spies among us. If I put a backdoor into my software for "government use only", how long would it take for a foreign government to figure it out or steal it. Good encryption, at this point, is unbreakable (at least until quantum computers of sufficient size are available). It is the user interface that always gets broken. Make one mistake and they are in.

 

In the late 80's, the government recommended the use of the 56-bit DES. It was considered very secure at the time. Now, the computer I am typing this on, can break that code in less than 3 minutes. WEP was once considered secure for Wi-Fi. Now, this computer can break it in under a minute. Even the current standard WPA-PSK is not secure enough to withstand a prolonged attack. Finally, need I remind the reader that just recently, hackers (probably Chinese government in origin) managed to retrieve a large portion of the federal personnel database. They can't even keep THEIR data secure. That investigation is still ongoing.

 

In my opinion, no. Even if I believed that our government would not eventually abuse the backdoor, in no way do I believe that they could keep it secret, or that a foreign enemy might not find a way in. Backdoors are built-in insecurity.

 

Even if you believe that you have nothing to hide, I can assure you that you do. While you might not be breaking any laws, there is a great deal of information, business and personal, that you would not ever want made public. In point of fact most, if not all of us, also break laws on an almost daily basis, of which we are unaware of their very existence. Just recently, I was informed of a law that I was breaking and didn't even know it was there. Not a big deal, really. But, do I want a foreign government building up a dossier on me, what I do for a living, how much money I don't have, etc? Not really. Think about how many things you say in emails, texts, notes... that you would never want made public. 

 

Finally, remember Richard Jewell. He was the guy that found the backpack bomb in Olympic Park. Once he became a person of interest, his life became an open book. He was destroyed in the media. Just imagine what could have been found out about him in this current day. We didn't even have an internet then. Yet, in the end, after his life was destroyed, he was found to be a hero that saved many lives. But, he never recovered from it.  I could go on and on....

Edited by Old_Klipsch_Guy
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We know quantum computers can hack such things with ease, and we know that they've developed to pretty high levels.

Quantum computers can solve the encryption, but first you have to get in the front door, and that door has been booby-trapped. You can't use brute force password guessing. After a mere 10 tries it blows up the phone. There are 10,000 possible passwords.  

 

 

Correction. They say quantum computers can do such hacking, but it has never been done.  Isn't the best a quantum computer can do so far something like 5 x 3?

 

 

If that. I think it's all "forward potential" at this point. 

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do I want a foreign government building up a dossier on me,

 

What makes you think it would be foreign?

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What follows is just my opinion... I am also a software developer...

 

Let's just say that our government would never violate our privacy without the legal and Constitutional means of doing so... I'll let the reader decide if they would believe that.

 

One of the biggest secrets our government EVER held was the design of the thermonuclear weapon. Yet, it was stolen and given to our enemies by spies among us. If I put a backdoor into my software for "government use only", how long would it take for a foreign government to figure it out or steal it. Good encryption, at this point, is unbreakable (at least until quantum computers of sufficient size are available). It is the user interface that always gets broken. Make one mistake and they are in.

 

In the late 80's, the government recommended the use of the 56-bit DES. It was considered very secure at the time. Now, the computer I am typing this on, can break that code in less than 3 minutes. WEP was once considered secure for Wi-Fi. Now, this computer can break it in under a minute. Even the current standard WPA-PSK is not secure enough to withstand a prolonged attack. Finally, need I remind the reader that just recently, hackers (probably Chinese government in origin) managed to retrieve a large portion of the federal personnel database. They can't even keep THEIR data secure. That investigation is still ongoing.

 

In my opinion, no. Even if I believed that our government would not eventually abuse the backdoor, in no way do I believe that they could keep it secret, or that a foreign enemy might not find a way in. Backdoors are built-in insecurity.

 

Even if you believe that you have nothing to hide, I can assure you that you do. While you might not be breaking any laws, there is a great deal of information, business and personal, that you would not ever want made public. In point of fact most, if not all of us, also break laws on an almost daily basis, of which we are unaware of their very existence. Just recently, I was informed of a law that I was breaking and didn't even know it was there. Not a big deal, really. But, do I want a foreign government building up a dossier on me, what I do for a living, how much money I don't have, etc? Not really. Think about how many things you say in emails, texts, notes... that you would never want made public. 

 

Finally, remember Richard Jewell. He was the guy that found the backpack bomb in Olympic Park. Once he became a person of interest, his life became an open book. He was destroyed in the media. Just imagine what could have been found out about him in this current day. We didn't even have an internet then. Yet, in the end, after his life was destroyed, he was found to be a hero that saved many lives. But, he never recovered from it.  I could go on and on....

 

All that might be true, but we have terrorists to round up globally, and if private information impedes that, too bad. Search and destroy will have some victims and if all you lose is your contact list, what a nothing price to pay for our Troops to be Safe, and our Policemen to be Safe from the Enemy within.

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I advise most of you to seek help for your narcissism--99% of you are very boring people. I’d rather Keep Up with the Kardashians than spy on you. If elected, counseling will be available to you. I will not raise your taxes...of course their will be a usage fee to attend this mandatory counseling. If you’re unable to pay this usage fee, you can pay off this debt by helping the Mexicans build that wall. 

 

I'm trying to source that quote. Let's see, it begins with "narcissism" so it has to be a shot from the wingnuts. Ah, and the Kardashians are there to represent the Evil Hollywood. And of course, the wall, kinda makes it a dead giveaway - I got it!--- It's MY MAN, the Teflon Donald! ^5 ^5

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Bill Gates register to support Cook on Charlie Rose. Reiterates that Spoke can't possibly defy the government. Sanity reigns.

Sent from my SM-T330NU using Tapatalk

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Most police view anyone not a LEO an enemy. 

In the 70's our government put agents into the Klipsch factory regularly. DEA, FBI, all the alphabet LEO's had people working there at various times. If you don't know why, then I will not explain. It used to be a game with employees to figure out which new hire was a fed. 

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Ted Olson on CBS this AM.

 

He may very well be the best lawyer in America right now. He pretty much handily stuffed the howling, growling Charlie Rose.

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Let's just say that our government would never violate our privacy without the legal and Constitutional means of doing so... I'll let the reader decide if they would believe that.

 

My bet is they've already cracked it, but don't want to reveal that so they want it to be Apple before they use the information in court.

 

Dave

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Ted Olson on CBS this AM.

 

He may very well be the best lawyer in America right now. He pretty much handily stuffed the howling, growling Charlie Rose.

 

Caught some of that this morning. Made the wife stop and listen.

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http://www.newsweek.com/apple-says-fbi-wants-access-11-more-iphones-429801?google_editors_picks=true

 

See, you can't believe the government. The FBI thought they could make this only about the so-called San Bernadino shooters in the press, and the public would cry out for Apple to give in. I am always amazed that our fellow citizens have no idea how the government manipulates them.

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