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MercedesBerater

Home theatre build....DIY..slowly..

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Ok. Good to know! I am working on wrapping all a/c sheet metal with an off brand "dynamat" type product to reduce ringing. I didn't know if the flex duct was worth it or a gimmick.

Guess I'll be closing off the main feed to the room and add one run of flex-ducting.

For the $40 I'll probably spend doing it, can't hurt I suppose.

Thanks for the input.

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FWIW - I would do EVERYTHING you can think of over the ceiling, behind the walls (run wires for atmos, etc).  You can always not use it, but once its done...

 

Wiring especially is relatively inexpensive.

Good luck with it all and enjoy it!  There will always be those things, but celebrate the luxury of the great space!

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Here's another topic for discussion.

Front stage will be filled with sand to damp any resonance from speakers being on the stage.

COULD I do sand in back half of rear seating riser to damp the towers and subs back there.... And do insulation in the front half and somehow make the rear riser a gigantic bass trap? Would I just need some vents in the front and rear for pressure flow? Or would it need much more than a few furnace return style vents ?

Just thinking maybe that's a great free bass trap spot that won't be noticeable..

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I put in wall plates for subwoofers in two locations, but ended up using speaker wire to drive my latest subwoofer in yet a third location, so sometimes you can't plan for everything!

I did the same with 5 pre-wired sub locations and I'm not using any of them, go figure.

 

MB, for atmos, that looks like a 8 ft ceiling height? I would recommend that you pre-wire it for atmos now before sheetrock is done. It wouldn't take long at all and very inexpensive. You never know, you might want to add overhead later and then all you have to do is cut the speaker hole, attach speaker wire and mount. I did notice a water pipe in the picture that is under the ceiling joists, are you going to move it up out of the way?

Would you have atmos speakers directly above seat position? Or two slightly in front, two slightly behind?

 

Slightly angled off, both front and rear. I used this Dolby Atmos guide to place mine at 45 and 135 degrees. 

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As for making the stage/riser a bass trap, I think it's a poor idea. From what I can find the stage would have to be built after the room is 100% finished to calculate exactly the size and spacing of ports to allow pressure to be affected by the "trap".

The better idea would be to just fill the stage with sand for resonance. And fill the riser with fluff in the front and sand in the rear.

And HOPE it's a broadband absorber....

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Atmos speakers can also be placed on top of the corner speakers and fired up reflecting off the ceiling. In fact, Klipsch is going to be adding them to their premier line. Make sure you have extra speaker wires run to your rear corners and front corners if you think you may go that route in the future.

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I think I would prefer, if atmos is to be used, to do in ceiling.

You guys are right, it's a negligible amount to add a few wires for ceiling speaks now- and if I never use them- oh well.

Ordering the A/V rack in the next day or two... Waiting on a call back from the electrician for an estimate for sub panel and hooking up all my wires. (I'll run wire- but won't hook up to the giant death panel.)

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4 foot tall A/v rack ordered. Wall plates ordered, more subwoofer cable ordered. Almost out of drywall....again. Sucks to buy 6 sheets at a time and haul in a van.

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Front wall has first layer up. Got the subwoofer cables all run, faceplates on. They look pretty nice for a buck-fifty.

Tomorrow I'll run the wire for rear speakers and lights. Also the wires for Dolby atmos ;)

Really need an electrican to come out soon.

post-60770-0-03080000-1429398563_thumb.j

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Update:

The A/V rack came in today. It's HEAVY. Well much heavier than I thought it would be. Went together very easy. Will be mounting inside wall in the upcoming week. Need to build a sturdy shelf for it to sit on and bolt to.

AND got tired of waiting for an electrician so I could see and keep working, so I added my own breaker and hooked up some wires! And it worked. And I didn't die!! Did I mention I'm terrified of main 200amp panels!?!?

Now I can keep plugging along!

post-60770-0-86240000-1429658080_thumb.j

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Update:

The A/V rack came in today. It's HEAVY. Well much heavier than I thought it would be. Went together very easy. Will be mounting inside wall in the upcoming week. Need to build a sturdy shelf for it to sit on and bolt to.

AND got tired of waiting for an electrician so I could see and keep working, so I added my own breaker and hooked up some wires! And it worked. And I didn't die!! Did I mention I'm terrified of main 200amp panels!?!?

Now I can keep plugging along!

Nice rack! Pardon the pun!! I know you're not asking, but I'm a low voltage contractor, please consider having a licensed electrician check your panel work. I deal with the low voltage side of things daily and when I finished my basement, I hired an electrician to double check all of my work concerning power outlets, lights, etc. and the panel to make sure it met code and or surpassed it. Also, you might want to pull an extra 20 amp circuit to your a/v equipment room for any future expansion that might involve big amps, etc. Just tryin to help.

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I am running 30amp to the a/v rack. And the lights I added today are very much temporary. It will provide me enough light to continue working in a room with no windows.

Once I finish drywalling and adding wood colums I will hire a real deal licensed electrician to balance the primary panel and check all wiring circuits.

For now I was just happy I could make the temporary 3 lights along one wall function via switch so I can finish the room :D

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A/V rack is bolted inside wall all 2x6 to support the weight of any possible future amps.
 

 

Looking good. Are you going to have ventilation for the equipment in the rack?

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Yes. The rack opens up to this long hallway. And I'll do a rack fan just to be safe.

Here are two views of the rack. Here is from am adjacent room that looks down the length of hallway, lots of cold air there.

Second is from the hallway looking at the space I've granted to have for hook ups and whatnot behind the rack.

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post-60770-0-33480000-1430260892_thumb.j

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Run an ac duct to the rack….Ive seen that done :D

That's what I did. Not a bad idea to do since it's still in the construction stage. I even added a ceiling fan.

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