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WeeBeastie

University MID-T - for a 1954 Klipschorn?

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This doo-dad was kept, I think as a spare part for the 1954 Klipschorn that my grandfather had for sale in his shop.  What's it for?  (I inherited this and the speaker, but I'm not versed in the technical side.)

 

Would this MID-T be a replacement part for something the speaker already had, or would it have been an upgrade?  It's possible that this part came with the speaker and that whatever was shipped by University Loudspeakers was the upgrade and got installed in 1956.  In other words, does the sales slip for a model MIT-60 match the object pictured?

 

Thanks!

Klipsch part - University label MID-T (1).jpg

Klipsch part - University label MID-T.jpg

1956 University Loudspeakers paper for Klipsch part (1).jpg

Klipschorn mono (8).JPG

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It is certainly a midrange horn driver.  The threading on the pipe-like end appears to be the standard type.  It could be used to a great number of midrange horns.

 

I've looked at the Allied Electronics catalogs on-line for the subject years.  Some University raw units are listed,  but neither of these.  If there is something to be inferred from that I don't know what it is.

 

 The Klipschorn timeline states:

 

The first three-way Klipschorn incorporated a Jensen RP203 tweeter. This

tweeter came from the famous Jensen G-610 Triaxial 15" driver and required

considerable negotiations with Jensen. It was not until mid-1952 that all

Klipschorns were three-way. A two-way Klipschorn with response to 12Khz was

generally adequate for program material up to that time. The University MID-T-

4401 replaced the Jensen unit as the tweeter of choice later in 1951.

 

It was bugging me that the photo of the MID-T showed a driver which was smaller than I thought it should be as compared to the fingers..

 

At least now we can say the MID-T was probably provided by the Klipsch factory.

 

 

 

This is a wonderful question you've posed.  I hope people who are better informed than I can shed some light.

 

WMcD

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A similar looking but much larger part on the back of my speaker is in this pic...

 

Klipsch part already installed (1).jpg

Edited by WeeBeastie

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How interesting, WMcD.  Thanks.  I tried taking a pic of the two drivers (correct term?) for size comparison.  The installed one came out looking larger by comparison, but maybe you'll get the idea.  I've also realized that the whole crossover network business was replaced (upgraded?) in 1957. See pix.

Klipsch crossover network and squawker (1).jpg

Klipsch crossover network and squawker (5).jpg

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I really should follow Ben Franklin.  He said: It is better to keep your mouth shut and let people suspect you are a fool, than to open it and confirm their suspicion. But . . . 

 

I do get the impression your grandpa was a big fan of the Khorn.  The MIT unit is certainly a close cousin of the original.  Maybe he purchased it on the open market as upgrade or simple replacement.  He later went to a crossover upgrade from Klipsch.

 

In reviewing the catalogs I get the impression that suppliers of drivers for home units assumed buyers would be using a non-horn loaded woofer and a tweeter.  What we see of midrange drivers were for PA use and in a separate section of the catalogs.  Of course PWK had his K-5 horn mid and used the University we see in your later photos.

 

Being a perfectionist, he added real horn loaded tweeters.  The sources of audio were changing with FM live, TV live (which was FM) and LPs (when?).  So sources were catching up to the performance of the K-Horn.

 

In those years, EV and University and perhaps others had similar horn loaded tweeters we see above.  One big change was the EV T-35  and EV-T350 with the added Avedale (sp?) phase plug which we see as the distinctive hemispherical button. Early T-35s did not have it. It kicked up response above 12,000 Hz.  This, rebranded and QCed became the K77. 

 

WMcD

 

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My grandfather was really into radio; it was his profession.  The building is the place he would have had this speaker on display.  A couple of decades earlier he probably provided the PA system for the flight of the Flying Keys in Meridian, MS.  He is the big man standing behind the car.

Hagemeyer Bldg 03.jpg

Hagemeyer Bldg 05.jpg

Jesse Hagemeyer Sr with huge speakers on a car-fixed-fixed sm.jpg

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Can anyone identify the model and year of the car?  Smile.

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5 hours ago, WeeBeastie said:

My grandfather was really into radio; it was his profession.  The building is the place he would have had this speaker on display.  A couple of decades earlier he probably provided the PA system for the flight of the Flying Keys in Meridian, MS.  He is the big man standing behind the car.

Hagemeyer Bldg 03.jpg

Hagemeyer Bldg 05.jpg

Jesse Hagemeyer Sr with huge speakers on a car-fixed-fixed sm.jpg

COOLEST PIC I'VE SEEN IN A WHILE!!!!!!

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18 hours ago, WMcD said:

It was bugging me that the photo of the MID-T showed a driver which was smaller than I thought it should be as compared to the fingers..

 

That was my initial reaction also.

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10 hours ago, WMcD said:

 

Can anyone identify the model and year of the car?  Smile.

 

I’m guessing a ‘34 Ford.

 

Does the sign visible just inside the door say “Bogen?”

 

What is, “ . . .  the flight of the Flying Keys?”

 

EDIT:  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Flying_Keys

 

Thank you sharing these great photos.  Are there more?

 

 

D5DBB516-18DF-40E0-A947-C2C68CBB1BC0.jpeg

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1 minute ago, DizRotus said:

 

I’m guessing a ‘34 Ford.

 

Does the sign visible just inside the door say “Bogen?”

 

What is, “ . . . The flight of the Flying Keys?”

 

Thank you sharing these great photos.  Are there more?

 

 

looks like it... My uncle was one of the v.p. Of bogen ..

 

He start out as a purchasing manager..

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One of the great things about this forum is learning new things, like the fascinating story of the Key brothers, two aviation pioneers.  I’d be surprised if PWK didn’t know of them, If not know them personally.

 

CD735BCB-DCB5-4F6C-AD90-C18E79381984.jpeg

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Mine, with horn.  it is 2.5" od.

 

 

20180416_100441_resized.jpg

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4 hours ago, DizRotus said:

What is, “ . . .  the flight of the Flying Keys?”

EDIT:  https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Flying_Keys

Thank you sharing these great photos.  Are there more?

Pics I found in my dad's collection of a reunion and send-off in 1955.  He remembered the original endurance flight because he lived in the city below, and even a little kid notices a plane flying in circles for days on end.  :)

https://dragonseye.com/blog/2016/01/The-Flying-Keys/

 

Here is one of my grandfather Hagemeyer in his first radio shop around 1930.
http://dragonseye.com/photos/picture.php?/16506-jkhagemeyerradioshop2/category/757-hagemeyer

 

and the car...

20180416105747-bf705957-me.jpg

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Definitely a Ford flathead V8; probably a 1934.

 

Thanks for sharing the very interesting story and photos.

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I suppose that was a Bonnie and Clyde type car.  Supposedly Clyde wrote Henry Ford to praise it.  Gee, it is a big car, like an SUV today.  Also lots of horsepower in the car and sound system.  Grandpa was a man not given to half measures.

 

The Beach Boys sing of the 1932 couple version of the car as a Little Duce "1932" Coupe with a V-8 flat head mill (flat head because it had side valves and not overhead valves).  Still, it will walk a Thunderbird like it's standing still.  At least when it is ported (intake runners) and relieved (exhaust) and stroked (increase stroke) and bored (increased bore). Smile. to

 

Didn't Casablanca have a car with horns on top to announce the Germans are coming to Paris? 

 

I don't know if Bogen was making horns in those days or ever.  However, such horns appear in a catalog from 1935

 

Obviously grand dad would fit in well on this forum.

 

WMcD

Quote

 

 

1935 Allied Radio Catalog.jpg

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I can't resist.  The coupe didn't have roof space for the horns though.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A 32 Ford and a 34 Ford are not the same.  The difference is more than just a model year designation.  Visually, the radiator/grille of the 32 is upright, whereas the 34’s is raked back. The 34 is larger than a 32.

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