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Tarheel TJ

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About Tarheel TJ

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  1. I have a 2230 as well. Mine crackles a fair bit on startup. I usually turn it on with the speaker selector turned to “off”. Let the amp settle for a minute or two and then turn the speakers to “on”. As others have mentioned, deoxit on the pots also helps. If you are so inclined, you can get a full rebuild kit from irebuildmarantz.com . I just got started rebuilding mine last week. It will be like a brand new unit when done. You will need to have some experience soldering parts to circuit boards to do this yourself.
  2. I can only speak to the MiniDSP, as I have never used a Xilica. I find the MiniDSP software plugin (I am using 4x10HD) to be extremely straightforward and easy to use. There is definitely a learning curve to getting good results with it, but the software itself is very easy and intuitive to use. I got decent results right off the bat, and really, really good results after a few months of trial and error. Now I can setup a speaker or swap a component and have it perfectly dialed in after an hour or two of measuring and adjusting. The basic MiniDSP ($99) is 48kHz, but the MiniDSP 2x4HD ($199) and the MiniDSP 4x10HD ($499) are 96kHz. I hear the 48kHz versions have a somewhat higher noise floor, but I have never tried it myself. I find the noise floor to be very quiet (non-existent to my ears)and sound quality to be very good on my 96kHz version.
  3. Sounds like you are getting some really killer results. Congratulations! I would love to see some photos of what you are doing with the foam, fiber wool and rock wool. Post some pics when you can.
  4. Thanks for your insight into linear phase filters, it is a fascinating subject. Could this problem be solved by also delaying the video signal? It wouldn't work for video games, obviously, but it should work for movies/video, right? What hardware are people using to incorporate FIR filters into their hi-fi system?
  5. Ok, now a little data to help us all visualize what we are hearing. Here are two spectrogram plots. The first one, dated today, is my LS bass bins, with Eminence N314X drivers on ZXPC 17x11, crossed at 700hz. The second plot is my previous setup, with was the LS bins with B&C De750TNs on ZXPC horn, crossed at 400hz. The difference in high frequency ringing seems to tell the tale.
  6. I used this exact Musical Paradise amp for years to power my La Scalas. Sounded great to me. Plenty of power for Klipsch speakers. This amp responds well to tube rolling as well. The sound changes more with tube swaps than most amps do. I really liked Gold Lion KT-66s in mine. Also, the comment about clipping damaging your speakers mostly pertains to SS amplifiers, not tubes. SS amps clip hard, producing a very harsh sounding "clip" or "pop" sound, This sends all kinds of high frequency energy into your speakers, which can blow tweeters. Tube amps tend to clip much more softly, rolling off the top of the waveform instead of cutting it off sharply. They are much less likely to damage speakers, even if over-driven. So you have nothing to worry about, even if you want to try to rock out with 6 watts.
  7. I just bought a pair of these from LTusler. Thanks again! Got them hooked up on Friday and spent the better part of the weekend dialing in the DSP. I am using them with ZXPC 11x17 horns with Eminence 1.4-2" adapters. My findings line up closely with what Dave A and jwgorman have found. Initially, I tried to cross it at 400hz, like I had been doing previously with my B&C De750TN, but this did not sound good. The highs were clearly much more refined, but there was a crunchiness to the mid-range that did not sound good at all. I raised the crossover to 700hz, which is about as high as my LS bass bins will allow, and they sound much happier. I suspect that they would sound even better at 1000hz, but my current setup cant get there. I bought these drivers in anticipation of a future project that will allow a higher crossover point, so I look forward to trying that later in the year. For now, 700hz sounds pretty good. Overall impressions are excellent. I had pretty good sound before with the B&C drivers, but the Eminence immediately stood out as having much, MUCH better high frequency sound. The B&C, with their titanium diaphragms, always sounded hashy up top. A crash cymbal would be there, but it would sound like radio static more than the real thing. The Eminence drivers are much clearer and actually sound like cymbals. I have never heard beryllium drivers before, but this is sounds like how I imagine Be drivers do. Very clean, natural decay, lots of detail, no harshness. Perhaps I am still in the honeymoon period with these guys, but I am liking it, A LOT!
  8. Sounds like you are off to a good start. You have a large-ish room with high ceilings, which is good. You have some pretty good gear to start out with. My recommendation is that you look into some room treatment. My guess is that your garage is pretty echo-y and reflective. Some absorption and diffusion will probably make the gear you already have sound a LOT better. You can accomplish this for just a few hundred dollars for everything. A few thick absorber panels and some strategically-placed diffusers will definitely bring a smile to your face.
  9. Beautiful speaker! Thank you for sharing. Where are you located?
  10. In general, I'd say I agree with you. There is precious little difference in sound between well designed amplifiers. And, for the most part, changing amps or rolling tubes isn't going to have nearly as dramatic of an effect as changing speakers, room treatment, or phono stylus. Those truly are the low-hanging fruit of audio. However, despite my desire to have everything be measurable and testable via the scientific method, I am forced to admit that there is a bit of art to audio reproduction as well. There does seem to be some difference to be made in the intangible and immeasurable, though in my experience it is subtle. I do think that amplifiers and even (gasp!) cables can make some difference. I think most people put far too much focus on these things, but I do think that on a very subtle level, there is something to it. Once you have your room, speakers and sources 100% dialed, you can make very small improvements with things like amplifiers, CD players, etc. However, for most people, this is like washing your car and thinking it will go faster due to less weight and drag. More placebo than anything. That said, I do use tubes in my system (SS as well). Could I tell if you switched the tube amps out for SS? Maybe, I don't know for sure. They light up nice and make me happy, so I'm not complaining, haha.
  11. Since some seem to take issue with my statement about LaScala bass, let me clarify. The La Scalas are down by about 10dB at 40hz and by about 15dB at 30hz, which is where the lowest fundamental is for a bass guitar. In my opinion, that is not satisfactory bass for enjoying rock and roll; perhaps its fine for Jazz. Sure, you can EQ it up, but if your plan involves adding 15dB of EQ boost to get your bottom end, I'd urge you to reconsider. You'll suffer lots of compression and IMD as a result. Far from ideal. I love my LaScalas, but I'd follow the recommendation of many people on this forum over the last 20 years or so.... use them with a sub for maximum enjoyment.
  12. Certainly you can EQ some output below 60hz, but in stock form, it ain't there.
  13. I will always recommend La Scalas with enthusiasm. They are truly one of the greatest speakers out there. Just be aware of their bass response. As has been documented many times on this forum, they roll off below 100hz, and have basically zero output below about 60hz. If you love rock and roll, you will want a subwoofer to go with them. Otherwise, your KLF30s will out perform them in the bass department.
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