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My biggest concerns while our power was out were my freezer full of venison (at least 150 lbs of steaks, ground, and sausage), and my boat engines.

 

My son and I put the meat in 5 large plastic bins and set those outside where the temp was single digits at the time.  After the power was restored and seemed stable, it went back to the freezer.  We cable tied the bins shut to keep the critters out during the two nights outside.

 

When the power was out at the marina for two days (and obviously no bilge heater working), I made the somewhat treacherous (especially in the dark) 12-mile round trip to the marina every 8 to 9 hours to run the engines up to operating temperature, then turn off and come home (thank goodness for four wheel drive - way too cold to sleep in the cabin without power). The blocks and heat exchangers stayed above freezing, and seem to be running great.  Many, many of my marina neighbors will likely have very expensive engine repair bills.

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4 minutes ago, Seadog said:

Many, many of my marina neighbors will likely have very expensive engine repair bills.

 the marinas down here have hundreds of big  boats --- but they're out of the water ----

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10 minutes ago, RandyH000 said:

 the marinas down here have hundreds of big  boats --- but they're out of the water ----

I just received an automated call from the marina that some boats are now sinking due to freeze damage to through-hull seacock valves.  I'm heading there now. My boat should be okay, but I need to be sure, and I may be able to help others.

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1 hour ago, Seadog said:

I just received an automated call from the marina that some boats are now sinking due to freeze damage to through-hull seacock valves.  I'm heading there now. My boat should be okay, but I need to be sure, and I may be able to help others.

bring a water  pump --automotive thick grease , can be  applied on the contours of the seacock valve  in case of damage from freezing  ---and close them  if you have to -

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3 hours ago, RandyH000 said:

is your main water supply  from  the street frozen ---if yes and you can shut the main valve of water that feeds the house -------shut it   ---

 

- if there is no such valve ,  and you can have access to the main water pipe  -----install a shut off valve    -----shutting the water will avoid bursting the pipes  ,when it's back to normal -  open the valve , gradually -

 

Also let a spigot drip slowly inside, we've always done that for a hard freeze here. But here that is like below mid-teens for an overnight or longer. Still have the copper pipe for the main line in!

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2 hours ago, Seadog said:

 

 

I left the water on at the meter near the road, and allowed the indoor faucets to drip throughout the great freeze.  I do have the t-handle handy just in case I need to shut of the valve!

Is it copper or Pex? Pex will definitely take a lot more abuse from the freezing and expansion. 

2 hours ago, Seadog said:

My biggest concerns while our power was out were my freezer full of venison (at least 150 lbs of steaks, ground, and sausage), and my boat engines.

 

My son and I put the meat in 5 large plastic bins and set those outside where the temp was single digits at the time.  After the power was restored and seemed stable, it went back to the freezer.  We cable tied the bins shut to keep the critters out during the two nights outside.

 

When the power was out at the marina for two days (and obviously no bilge heater working), I made the somewhat treacherous (especially in the dark) 12-mile round trip to the marina every 8 to 9 hours to run the engines up to operating temperature, then turn off and come home (thank goodness for four wheel drive - way too cold to sleep in the cabin without power). The blocks and heat exchangers stayed above freezing, and seem to be running great.  Many, many of my marina neighbors will likely have very expensive engine repair bills.

You probably just saved yourself a huge headache with your boat. 

5 minutes ago, JohnJ said:

Also let a spigot drip slowly inside, we've always done that for a hard freeze here. But here that is like below mid-teens for an overnight or longer. Still have the copper pipe for the main line in!

The freezing water lines in Texas froze at the opposite end of what we would think around here. Most of them froze closer to the source. Here they freeze at the crawl space or a cabinet on an exterior wall.

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14 minutes ago, JohnJ said:

 Still have the copper pipe for the main line in!

great ,  these pipes heat up very quickly with a  torch  if needed --

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3 minutes ago, Ceptorman said:

The freezing water lines in Texas froze at the opposite end of what we would think around here. Most of them froze closer to the source. Here they freeze at the crawl space or a cabinet on an exterior wall.

And that does sound bad!

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5 minutes ago, Ceptorman said:

The freezing water lines in Texas froze at the opposite end of what we would think around here. Most of them froze closer to the source. Here they freeze at the crawl space or a cabinet on an exterior wall.

Son in law thought he was smart as he did a good job insulating pipes and told my daughter that there was no need to drip his faucets.  It froze at the meter.

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If water is under enough pressure, it won't freeze, or if it's flowing.

 

@CECAA850  @Seadoghow often does a storm like this hit Texas? I don't recall one this bad in your area. 

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13 minutes ago, Ceptorman said:

If water is under enough pressure, it won't freeze, or if it's flowing.

 

@CECAA850  @Seadoghow often does a storm like this hit Texas? I don't recall one this bad in your area. 

This bad?  Down here maybe every 10 years or so.  We'll get below freezing often but not in the teens like this was.  Snow maybe every 2 or 3 years.  It typically doesn't last long.

 

Water pressure at his house is probably 40psi (I'm guessing).  It froze solid and it was in a meter box about a foot or so down.

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29 minutes ago, CECAA850 said:

 

 

Water pressure at his house is probably 40psi (I'm guessing).  It froze solid and it was in a meter box about a foot or so down.

 

 

he  can  apply  electrical current   to the pipe using a generator or home electricity , that can unfreeze it over a few hours -

 

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1 hour ago, Ceptorman said:

If water is under enough pressure, it won't freeze, or if it's flowing.

 

@CECAA850  @Seadoghow often does a storm like this hit Texas? I don't recall one this bad in your area. 

The last time it was this cold was December 1989.  My wife and I had just moved into our first house.  The pipes survived, but I lost my entire lawn of St. Augustine grass, which is not cold tolerant.  The big difference this time is the number of really cold days was longer, and in 1989 I do not recall the massive power and water outages.

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31 minutes ago, RandyH000 said:

 

 

 

he  can  apply  electrical current   to the pipe using a generator or home electricity , that can unfreeze it over a few hours -

 

I think he used a propane torch.  Took maybe 10 minutes.

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27 minutes ago, Seadog said:

The last time it was this cold was December 1989.  My wife and I had just moved into our first house.  The pipes survived, but I lost my entire lawn of At. Augustine grass, which is not cold tolerant.  The big difference this time is the number of really cold days was longer, and in 1989 I do not recall the massive power and water outages.

We had a horrendous ice storm here in 97.  Took power lines down all around the area.  We were out of power for 3 days.

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Just now, CECAA850 said:

I think he used a propane torch.  Took maybe 10 minutes.

smart Son in Law-

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Just now, RandyH000 said:

smart Son in Law-

Smart would have dripped the pipes. lol.

 

He's a great kid and extremely resourceful.  Major in the marines as well.

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11 minutes ago, CECAA850 said:

Smart would have dripped the pipes. lol.

 

He's a great kid and extremely resourceful.  Major in the marines as well.

Next time he'll listen to you --  and we're all proud For You  , we need these Guys  --

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18 minutes ago, RandyH000 said:

Next time he'll listen to you

That's debatable.  I told my daughter and my daughter told him.  Maybe he thought it was her idea, LOL.

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