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Peter

Klipsch RF7 II and Denon AVR-X7200WA question

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2 hours ago, Peter said:

I am back, Friday I bought the Denon AVR X7200WA, one word WOW emoji41.png

 

Grrrr can’t explain good in English

I am so happy with the 7200!!!

All of your friends in the US understand "wow" my friend.  Your English is fine.   B)

 

Quote

Can’t explain in good English but my RF7 II (bi-amp) now get the right signal.

 

I bi-amp my speakers.  I think it is different for different amps and different speakers.  They do not all respond well to bi-amping, I am glad your new 7200 and RF-7 II's work well together.  :emotion-21:

 

I also bi-wire my RC-64.  It may not be a large difference but I believe a lot of little improvements add up to a big improvement in sound.

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1 minute ago, Zen Traveler said:

no comment

 

No comment taken.  B)

  • Haha 2

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On 4/15/2018 at 2:13 PM, Zen Traveler said:

If you run one set of wires to each speaker and then run audyssey correctly you should be good to go

 

@Peter

 

Welcome, Peter!

 

Before you run Audyssey, read this:  "Audyssey FAQ Linked Here"  It helped me immensely, and my system has never sounded so good!  Since the Audyssey you have in your new Denon is a very good one, it will smooth out the response curve greatly.  That said, most people like a little smooth bass rise, so AFTER you run Audyssey, feel free to turn up your subwoofer by a few dB.

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@Zen Traveler @The History Kid, while I may be doing nothing but getting taken for a Klipsch marketing gimmick with “bi-amping my speaker because I’m cheating myself out of the full 140wpc @ 2 channels driven.

 

BUT, if I primarily use for HT, would’nt I be gaining more watts per channel. At best it’s 50-60 Watts per channel with all channels driven? Well that be a full 50-60w to the highs and a full 50-60w to the mids and lows if I bi-amped. If I didn’t bi-amp I’d be sharing 50-60w for whole Rf-7ii. 

 

As I was disconnecting for single wire setup, I thought about it more. I do 75% HT/PS4 and 25% music. I feel I’d benifit more with bi-amping for the HT application. Thoughts?

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10 minutes ago, dubs said:

@Zen Traveler @The History Kid, while I may be doing nothing but getting taken for a Klipsch marketing gimmick with “bi-amping my speaker because I’m cheating myself out of the full 140wpc @ 2 channels driven.

 

BUT, if I primarily use for HT, would’nt I be gaining more watts per channel. At best it’s 50-60 Watts per channel with all channels driven? Well that be a full 50-60w to the highs and a full 50-60w to the mids and lows if I bi-amped. If I didn’t bi-amp I’d be sharing 50-60w for whole Rf-7ii. 

 

As I was disconnecting for single wire setup, I thought about it more. I do 75% HT/PS4 and 25% music. I feel I’d benifit more with bi-amping for the HT application. Thoughts?

No.  You have to figure that your AVR is probably putting out between 40 and 60 WPC with all channels driven.  Regardless of how much you feed your tweeter - it's only going to take so much as it wants - which is generally only a few watts considering the design of a horn - they're efficient.  When you bi-wire, you're cutting down into that 40-60 range on an AVR.  When you run a normal configuration on an AVR, that level might go up to 50-75.  You'd probably be sending 70 to the woofers, and 5 to the tweeters, juxtaposed to 60 to the woofers and still 5 to the tweeters.  Your drivers don't demand equally.

 

A poor-mans-bi-amp (two wires using the same passive XO) really only benefits if you are using a power amp, or a pair/bridged setup thereof.  AVR bi-wiring is fancy looking...or ugly...that's the nuts and bolts of it.

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Another thing to note - just remembered this while recalling how my RF-3 XO's looked when I replaced them...

 

Even if you did bi-wire - you're still running them into the same passive XO.  You are not sending 60 W to the tweeter and 60 W to the woofer.  You're sending a straight 120 to the speaker - period.  The problem with that is for you to hear any difference in sound pressure, you need 2x the watts, which you don't get because you dropped the single line per channel from 75 to 60 when you bi-wired.  At most you'd get an extra 2dB of sound pressure, which you will not hear.

 

1 W of power with your RF-7's produce 101 dB of sound pressure.

2 W produces 104 dB

4 (5) W produces 107 dB

8 (10) W produces 110 dB

16 (15) = 113 dB

32 (30) = 116 dB

64 (65) = 119 dB

128 (130) = 122 dB

256 (250) = 125 dB MAX

512 (500) = 128 dB

1024 (1000) = 131 dB PEAK

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36 minutes ago, dubs said:

@Zen Traveler @The History Kid, while I may be doing nothing but getting taken for a Klipsch marketing gimmick with “bi-amping my speaker because I’m cheating myself out of the full 140wpc @ 2 channels driven.

 

BUT, if I primarily use for HT, would’nt I be gaining more watts per channel. At best it’s 50-60 Watts per channel with all channels driven? Well that be a full 50-60w to the highs and a full 50-60w to the mids and lows if I bi-amped. If I didn’t bi-amp I’d be sharing 50-60w for whole Rf-7ii. 

 

As I was disconnecting for single wire setup, I thought about it more. I do 75% HT/PS4 and 25% music. I feel I’d benifit more with bi-amping for the HT application. Thoughts?

Here is a review and the test numbers for your Denon

Hope this helps

 

https://www.soundandvision.com/content/denon-avr-x7200w-av-receiver

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You can Bi-Amp if you wish BUT your tweeter will probably not use more than

a couple of watts==Most of your power goes to the woofers.

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@dubs, Removing the jumper straps from between the two sets of binding posts on the back of the speaker divides the passive crossover network into two separate independent filters. Operating the AVR in bi-amp mode as configured by Denon allows the amplifier powering the tweeter to function without being affected by the woofer's back EMF, and the amplifier powering the woofer to function without being affected by the tweeter's back EMF. Then by performing Audyssey calibration (or MCACC for Pioneer or YPAO with Yamaha AVRs), the woofer is independently optimized, and the tweeter is independently optimized and time and phase aligned, which results in improved performance and better sound. 

 

I utilize passive bi-amping with my speakers that have removable jumpers and are powered by bi-amp capable AVRs. I also active tri-amp my Klipschorns on my main audio system. 

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I do not use the Audyssey even though I have done a calibration in the last week.

I can get far superior sound by using the built in equalizers and input levels

combined with the speaker levels in this AVR.

This is the most versatile AVR I've ever had and the sound options are almost endless.

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[mention=900]Peter[/mention]
 
Welcome, Peter!
 
Before you run Audyssey, read this:  "Audyssey FAQ Linked Here"  It helped me immensely, and my system has never sounded so good!  Since the Audyssey you have in your new Denon is a very good one, it will smooth out the response curve greatly.  That said, most people like a little smooth bass rise, so AFTER you run Audyssey, feel free to turn up your subwoofer by a few dB.


Thanks, that link is working but I get an empty page


Verzonden vanaf mijn iPhone met Tapatalk

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