Jump to content

Skichuck77

Members
  • Posts

    12
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Skichuck77

  1. Alan L, if your intent is to re-sell them some day the more “unique” you finish them the smaller your potential audience will be. But if you’re planning on hanging onto them then go ahead and do whatever you’d like. Dave MacKay, I restored a pair of La Scala’s in a similar fashion. Mine were pretty rough on all the front edges. I decided to add 1/4” birch ply to the sides and 1/8” to the top. This made it so I could just fill in the gaps between the new plywood and the old, chewed up edges. Much better than trying to build new edges and corners. I used Bondo wood filler. Excellent stuff. I used a 6” wide putty knife to spread a thin layer of Titebond II glue on each surface (one at a time of course), put the new plywood in place, then clamped the edges and used (very)heavy objects on the interior for about 24 hours. Not wanting to use the La Scala’s as a first-ever try at veneering I painted them satin black. The additional 1/4” added to the sides helped stiffen them and, while the difference wasn’t significant, the bass was definitely better.
  2. The batting lining the cabinet is likely intended to reduce cabinet vibration. Air, like water and electricity, takes the path of least resistance. With the large port on the front of the Cornwall’s a gasket around the rear access panel wouldn’t make much difference. Air would exit through a wide open port, not squeeze through tiny gaps around the rear panel.
  3. Hi Doc. Yes, the AA crossovers are pretty universally considered to be the best of the stock crossovers in the early La Scala’s. Some swear by the K77 tweeters with the round magnets. My ‘86 La Scala’s came with one K77 and one K77-M, same thing with the square magnet. I bought a second K77-M because it was cheaper and I couldn’t hear any difference. The mid driver with the solder-on wire lugs are prized but pretty rare. I can’t tell you from personal experience what the difference is but those might cost you more if the seller knows their value. I got very lucky my LS cost $400, plus about another $100 in materials and lots of time to fix up the cabinets. They were pretty ratty when I got them. Good luck with your search. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  4. Am I the only one that noticed the mid drivers aren’t the same? A point for a offering a lower price. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  5. Woofers and Tweeters, is that some newfangled type of corner loading you’re trying with the La Scala’s?
  6. Yes, the woofer is accessed through the cover on the bottom of the speaker. I’d disconnect the woofer wires at the crossover then connect your source directly to the woofer. It should be obvious if there’s a problem with it. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  7. I’ve had Heresy I’s, Forte I’s, still have Chorus II’s and La Scala I’s. The Salt Lake City, Utah market is anything but a good Klipsch Heritage market but I was still able to get deals ranging from good to great for each purchase. The Heresy’s were $225 with poor, repainted cabinets. The Forte’s were $395 in 8 of 10 condition. I sold them to a good friend. I got an absolute steal on the Chorus’, paying only $160, in 8 1/2 - 9 condition. The 1976 La Scala’s were $400 because they were the ugliest La Scala’s imaginable. Originally a birch raw finish they had been poorly painted a flat black with flat red dog houses. Then one had been painted a better, but still poor satin black, the second one still red and black. But they were mechanically sound with good, original drivers and AA crossovers. Like the OP, cosmetics aren’t a high priority but sound quality is. If I had to I would happily leave the La Scala’s the way I got them. With the chips, nicks and dings typical of poorly chaired for La Scala’s I’ve decided to clean them up and make them look a little nicer. I guess that’s a long way of saying that for your $800 - $1200 budget you should be able to find something you’ll love, especially in a market so much better than mine. Don’t spend another dime on electronics until after you’ve found your speakers. You have great gear already. And contrary to what so many of the “experts” will tell you I’ve found that, at least to my ears, all of my Klipsch have sounded great whether driven with my 3 watt hybrid tube amp, 50 watt class D chip amp, or my Marantz 2265 receiver. So, which do I prefer of all of them? Hands down the La Scala’s. Each time I’ve switched back to the La Scala’s after listening to any of the others the same thought comes back to my mind; the La Scala’s will never go anywhere. While the bass isn’t as deep as the Chorus or Forte’s I’ve never found them bass shy as some others say. I’m not a bass junky so hitting 20 Hz doesn’t excite me. What sets the La Scala’s apart from all the others is the intensity and impact of the bass. People have tried every way imaginable to describe it. But until you’ve heard them all of the adjectives one can come up with won’t prepare you for what you’ll hear. That’s my take on my experience with four of the Klipsch Heritage speakers. Hope it’s helpful. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  8. From the OP’s original post I’m not clear as to wether the test he refers to was a challenge to simply pick the “best sounding” system (which is totally subjective) or to show one could hear the difference between the two systems. And I’m not sure many of the posters here were clear either. That said, I’m a little surprised that someone hasn’t mentioned the Richard Clark $10,000 amp challenge. Very interesting reading. Here’s just one link that provides some good information. http://tom-morrow-land.com/tests/ampchall/index.htm I for one have never bought into all the baloney regarding differences between many of the high and low dollar electrical components many claim make an “astounding” difference in the final sound they hear from their speakers. 30+ years of working with electricity tells me that’s just what it is. Baloney. I’ll always put the bulk of my meager audio budget in my speaker purchases. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  9. Try simplyspeakers.com, then select speaker grills in the category list. These seem to be a pretty popular option and there are two types of fasteners to choose from. The biggest drawback is that using their attachment kits requires drilling holes around the perimeter of the passive. Which may or may not be a big deal to you. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  10. Do you check the ksl.com classifieds? It’s the Salt Lake/Utah version of Craigslist. You might get lucky and find a pair in the St. George or Cedar City area. You might even try posting a wanted ad on ksl. Good luck. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  11. There's currently a pair of CF-1's in Salt Lake City on the ksl.com classifieds. KSL is a Salt Lake radio and TV station that hosts a nice classified section. It's the Craigslist of Utah. There are no pics but you could contact the seller through his ad and request pics. Good luck with your search. Chuck Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  12. I want to cry when I read about the deals some of you (seemingly mostly in the east and mid-west) get on Klipsch Heritage models. And they seem to pop up all the time! But here in northern Utah heritage stuff is few and far between. I picked up a pair of Heresy's about a year ago for a decent price (not the $25 thrift store deals east coasters seem to routinely get) but I was lucky. I've been watching for a pair of Fortes for months without luck. Craigslist is rarely used around here. The classified section on ksl.com is the way to buy and sell in Utah. I even posted a Wanted ad without any responses. Maybe next time one of you guys happen to be driving the family to Disneyland you could drop off a pair of your "excess" thrift store Fortes at my place. ; ) Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
×
×
  • Create New...