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Differences between the Heresy Original, II and III (what are they)

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I was told years ago that the original Heresy speakers were the better of them all. But I have forgotten why? Also is this still true?

TIA,

John

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Notwithstanding many members' personal preferences for the sound of the original Heresy-I's, the H-III is a dramatic improvement over the older versions, and in particular, the Heresy-II. The crossover system is far more sophisticated, the drivers are more "balanced", and the new woofer (K-28) is by far, IMHO, the best of the three used in the models (K-22's and K-24's). I like the H-I's.... alot.... but when I rebuild them, I use the K-28 woofer, and an E/4500 crossover with the CT-125 tweeter. In effect, I'm significantly altering the original "sound".

When I ever get a chance and have the money on a new pair of speakers, they will absolutely be a pair of black H-III's. The days of rebuilding the H-I's are coming to a close. The cost of veneer, new drivers, crossovers, etc. is getting to the point that it is not really worthwhile. I would say the only reason I still "collect" and rebuild the H-I's is because they can be disassembled (LOL).

The H-II, while supposedly an improvement over the H-I, just does not have it for me "sonically". That, however is just my opnion. I have a pair that I kept, and they sound good, but they are used in a bedroom HT application, and not at any appreciable volume to really compare with a "full race modified" pair of H-I's. And.... other than caps and tweeter diapragms, not much you can really do. That being said.... You can convert the H-II to an H-III with the complete driver set and crossovers from Klipsch at a cost of about $580. With minimal woodworking skills, one can re-veneer their aging H-II's, add the H-III driver set and enjoy the new technology. The cabinets are identical in size, etc.

Again, unless you just really have to have a pair of H-I's or H-II's, the better way to go is a pair of H-III's. They can be had for about $1100 (which is not much more than a fully restored pair of the early versions), and..... they have the Klipsch 5 year warranty!

Hope that is of assistance.

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Good explanation Marshal, and given the money, I would get a new pair of HIIIs. Next in line would be to convert my HIIs to IIIs.

I personally like the IIs over the originals, because they sound more balanced to me. My own opinion points to the K55 mid on the original. It seems waaaay too hot for my tastes, and too in your face.

Overall, the newest ones really are better.

Bruce

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Thanks all for the info, the reason I brought up the subject as I saw a set of new III's on Ebay for $1100 if I remember correctly w/ free shipping. My old originals would make some killer garage speakers. The cabinets are still in pretty good shape but I would never consider doing a cosmetic restoration on those.

John

Good explanation Marshal, and given the money, I would get a new pair of HIIIs. Next in line would be to convert my HIIs to IIIs.

I personally like the IIs over the originals, because they sound more balanced to me. My own opinion points to the K55 mid on the original. It seems waaaay too hot for my tastes, and too in your face.

Overall, the newest ones really are better.

Bruce

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I personally like the IIs over the originals, because they sound more balanced to me. My own opinion points to the K55 mid on the original. It seems waaaay too hot for my tastes, and too in your face.

Interestingly that seems to be the consensus regarding the H-I vs H-II. I wonder though if it's not because of the diaphragms in the older K-55's being simply shot. Reason I say that is because the difference between an original K-55 and one of the PD5VH's (from BEC) was "day and night". The 55's in question were really "harsh" as you described. I ended up either replacing most of the old nasty diaphragms, or in complete rebuilds using new ones.

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You can convert the H-II to an H-III with the complete driver set and crossovers from Klipsch at a cost of about $580.


It might be good to point out that $580 is the price to upgrade a pair of H-IIs, not a single. It is a great deal. I did one of of my H-IIs when it was a centre speaker, and plan to do the other one sometime, to have a pair for surround.

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I've directltly compared the H1, H2 and H3 side by side. In my experience I found a huge difference between the H1 and the H2... liked the H2 the best (more detail... more high end sparkle). I didn't find as big a differece from the H2 to the H3. I thought both sounded very good.

Tony

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The 55's in question were really "harsh" as you described.

I didn't say they were "harsh", just not as balanced, with the mids too forward. That could, of course, be adjusted, but I don't think many "turn down" the mids.

Bruce

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"Harsh" may have been a poor choice of a descriptor, LOL!. "Uneven" certainly works as well. When the diaphragms get hard and dry out with age, they lose their "bottom end" which is what makes them sound "harsh", or that "uneven" effect.

I like Tony's observation. It's that "sparkle" that many either love, or.... dislike. It would be fun to experiment around with the H-II. It's just the "bolt-on" horns that limit what drivers can be used. IIR, the Heresy-II was the closest in general sound to my old (and long gone....) JBL 4311's and 4312's. That "sparkle", as Tony described, or "brilliance" and "presence" (as the two adjustment knobs on the JBL's were labeled) were really handy when dialing them in for "monitoring" in a small room.

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I'm in the market for a new pair of floor speakers, and am considering the Klipsch Heresy. I've read many reviews lately, and the Heresy III gets great reviews, yet, there are a lot of people out there who tell me the Heresy II is far superior to the Heresy III. I am confused by the wide range of opinions I read.

Can anybody enlighten me as to why?

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Having both, I can tell you that the Heresy III is a definite upgrade over the Heresy II.

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John, I also saw those new Heresy IIIs on eBay - they have several pair for sale. But, I've read so many negative comments about the Heresy IIIs lately, I need to find out why before I go that route. Have you decided to buy them?

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Having both, I can tell you that the Heresy III is a definite upgrade over the Heresy II.

That's good news since I have heard others complain that the Heresy IIs are superior to the IIIs. Thanks!

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Having both, I can tell you that the Heresy III is a definite upgrade over the Heresy II.

That's good news since I have heard others complain that the Heresy IIs are superior to the IIIs. Thanks!

I would gladly take a pair of HIIIs over my HIIs.

Marshall, perhaps your comparison with the 4311s is why I like my HIIs so much. [;)]I found the sound to be very similar, except the mid on the JBL will break up sooner and the overall sensitivity of the Heresy IIs is way better.

Bruce

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I nominated this to be the Official Klipsch Heresey Thread!

With so many versions of the Heresy into consumers hands, past down from owner to owner, and consistantly praised, its worth the effort to sustain the knowledge of these fine speakers.

The concept is basic. Find a Heresy Cabinet and either pay some one to refurbish or hit up Bob Crites or Klipsch and roll your own. Less we forget the option to buy brand new as save the effort if you just want the quickest results.

This thread needs part numbers and business to resource...

-Bill

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This thread discusses "how to" (with pictures...) to refinish/ re-furbish Heresy-I's and II's: http://forums.klipsch.com/forums/t/109693.aspx

This thread discusses "how to" (with pictures...) to redo the grills: http://forums.klipsch.com/forums/t/110684.aspx

Further below is an extract from: http://forums.klipsch.com/forums/t/103886.aspx which outlines the Heritage series codes, finishes, etc and the parts still available for Heresy-I's and II's.

HERESY (and Heritage in general) MODEL & SERIAL LABEL CODES:

1. The Heritage series until 1984 were relatively simple: they were hand written, and first line was the model and wood/finish type, and the second line was the serial number (serials discussed further below).

EXAMPLE:

H-OL

15T252

This tag would be for a Heresy-I, oak, lacquer finish, serial number: 15T252 (made in 1979)

2. Starting in 1984 and continuing until approximately 1988, the labels were similar, however used a "stamped" serial number identification below the model & finish code. By 1988-1989, the labels were "computer" generated, with the model, finish and other coding in a second "line".

HERESY TYPE CODES:

H = Heresy

HD = Heresy "decorator" with flush motor board and no grill

HERESY WOOD/FINISH CODES:

Until the late 70's-early 80's (and again in 2008 on Heritage models), customers could special order a number of exotic veneers.

It should be noted that until May, 2001 there were almost 100 different finish, grill cloth, and riser 'combinations' or variants that could be ordered for the Heresy’s and up to 75 versions of the Klipschorn.

In the mid-late 90's, Klipsch generally ceased most special order veneers and raw birch was also discontinued on most models, except Heresy-II's.

Material for raw birch is/was Georgia-Pacific cabinet/furniture grade 7 ply (5 inner standard grade plies and the two outer very-fine grade plies).

Risers for the Heritage series were originally optional. Heresy risers were generally "straight" until the late 1980's, and were still an option until the late 90's. In the late 1980's the "slant" style became the general standard. Slant risers appeared in the 1970's on Heresy-Is, but are not seen often. Currently the US version Heresy is shipped with slant riser, elsewhere in the world they can be ordered with or without the riser.

"Oiled" finish refers to the factory application of a high quality furniture grade wood oil that fills the pores of the wood and seals the finish. The type of oil is similar to a Watco "danish" or "rejuvenating" oil. Oiled finishes require a routine "oiling" with a light non-buildup type of furniture grade wood oil.

"Lacquer" refers to the application of one or two thin coats of a clear semi-gloss lacquer sprayed on the cabinet and motor board prior to installation of drivers. That lacquer was obtained from various vendors and currently is a #40 sheen, semi-gloss lacquer from Valspar/OPEC. Lacquer finishes only require a routine wiping off with a clean dry cloth to maintain the finish.

For "Black Lacquer" finishes, the factory used a #40 sheen lacquer primer, then #40 sheen black lacquer, with a clear #40 sheen to protect the black finish.

Generally, most veneered Heritage products had the rear panels/ sections sprayed with black lacquer primer. Starting in late 1983 and continuing to this day, the rear panels of the Heritage models are now sprayed with a coat of primer, then a coat of "textured" semi gloss, and a top coat of clear lacquer.

An option to have raw birch stained was also used, but not often seen. The stain was applied by spraying, and the serial number stickers generally indicated this option. Example: H-WS would have been a Walnut stained Heresy made from "raw-birch". This option was more commonly seen on La Scala's.

WOOD CODES (Note: Many of these wood options are seldom, if ever seen on a Heresy)

CODE WOOD FINISH REMARKS

AL Ash Lacquer Uncommon

AO Ash Oiled Uncommon

BB Birch Black Lacquer Common

BR Birch Raw Common

BL Birch Lacquer Common

BW Birch White Lacquer Rare Spec Order

CL Cherry Lacquer Uncommon **

CO Cherry Oiled Uncommon

D-BR Birch Raw Designer (No Grill)

D-BB Birch Black Lacquer Designer (No Grill)

FL Fir Lacquer Rare

FO Fir Oiled Rare

FB Fir Black Lacquer Late Models Only

F Fir Firzite Rare - Marine Grade

HL Hickory Lacquer (reported-unconfirmed)

MEL Macassar Ebony Lacquer Rare Spec Order

MEO Macassar Ebony Oiled (unconfirmed)

MHL Mahogany Lacquer Rare Spec Order

MHO Mahogany Oiled Rare Spec Order

MHR Mahogany Raw Rare Spec Order

ML Maple Lacquer Rare"Hardrock Maple"

MO Maple Oiled Rare"Hardrock Maple"

MO* Medium Oak Oiled Late 90's Models

OL Oak Lacquer Common (Red Oak)

OO Oak Oiled Common (Red Oak)

PNL* Persian Nut Lacquer Rare Spec Order

RRL* Rambling Rose Lacquer Rare Spec Order

PL Prima Vera Lacquer Rare Spec Order

PR Prima Vera Raw Rare -Early

RL Rosewood Lacquer Brazilian species

RO Rosewood Oiled Brazilian species

TL Teak Lacquer Uncommon

TO Teak Oiled Uncommon

TWL Tigerwood Lacquer Rare Spec Order

TWO Tigerwood Oiled Rare Spec Order

WL Walnut Lacquer Common

WO Walnut Oiled Common

WS Birch (stained) Stain Walnut on Birch

ZL Zebrawood Lacquer Rare Spec Order

ZO Zebrawood Oiled Rare Spec Order

* "Persian Nut" and "Rambling Rose" are not an actual wood species; they were made from linear cut birch or walnut wood which was dyed with specific hues/colors, re-glued into alternating color layers and then rotary cut into the respective veneer types to achieve the effect.

** Lacquer finish on early production Cherry was uncommon.

*** See also the list of new veneers available from Klipsch as of March 2008:

(http://forums.klipsch.com/forums/t/102665.aspx)

Production codes that will be assigned are unknown at this time.

SERIAL NUMBERS:

Based upon additional information related to the use of letters starting in 1955, the 1962-1983 coding has been modified to reflect that information.

The serial number was written on the paper serial tags and die stamped on the back edge of the top panel (inside top portion in LS). This practice was not used on later "MDF" cabinets for Heresy's, etc. Serial numbers can often be found written in pencil on the inside of some of the Heritage series, most notably Klipschorn's and Belle's.

While the 1946-1961 manufacturing dates can only be found in the Engineering Library in Indianapolis, accurate specific dates for the day of manufacture may also be found by close examination of the interior of the speaker cabinets. As an example there were often small inspection tags stapled inside the cabinets and penciled notations with dates inside the cabinets. An example of the production inspection stickers was the use of "PRIDE" stickers inside some models. These were used in the early through mid-1980's.

Additional letters stamped in the edges of Heritage series made from birch plywood, and on the poplar and ash "lumber core" as the substrate, were "USA" and/or the cabinet builder's and final sander's initial(s). For reasons of protecting their right to privacy, I have not identified the names of those superb craftsmen (and women).

DATES DESCRIPTION EXAMPLE

1955-1983 ##letter#### 20Y1234

Letters that look like numbers (e.g. I, O, Q, V) were not used. "S" is frequently misread as a "5" and Y has been confused with an X on occasion.

July 29, 1955 was the last day for the four digit serials (i.e. 1811). After that the "number- letter-serial" system went into effect (2 August 1955). The first "number-letter-serial" speaker was produced on the 2nd of August 1955; that serial number was 1A812.

In the 1955-1983 serial method the first, or prefix "digit(s)" before the year letter represents the sequence of production for each 1000 units. The suffix digits after the letter code will always be three digits - 001 through 999. For example 1C999 would be the 999th unit built, and 2C999 would be the 1999th built in 1965 C = 1965).

These digits before & after the year code apply only to that type of speaker.

The year code letter only identifies the year in which that number occurred.

As an example, if you have a pair of Klipschorn's and one of the serial numbers is 15T252, then by 1979 there had been 14,151 Klipschorn's made (Klipschorn's made in 1946-1947 were serial numbered from 1 to 20, and in 1948 started with #121, skipping #21 through #120).

For a pair of 1979 La Scala's, with serial number 22T403, it means there were 21,403 La Scala's made to that point.

Another example: A pair of Belles from 1979 has the serial number 3T242 and 243. This means that in 1979 these Klipsch Belles, the 2,242nd & 2,243rd, were made.

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE (1955 THROUGH 1983 ONLY)

A = 1955-63* F = 1968 L = 1973 S = 1978

B = 1963-64* G = 1969 M = 1974 T = 1979

C = 1965 H = 1970 N = 1975 U = 1980

D = 1966 J = 1971 P = 1976 W = 1981

E = 1967 K = 1972 R = 1977 X = 1982

Y = 1983

DATES DESCRIPTION EXAMPLE

1984-1989 YYWW#### 89261234

1. YY = year (e.g. 89 = 1989)

2. WW = week of the year (e.g. 26= last week in June)

3. The WW can also be a single digit for weeks 01 through 09; e.g. 877#### (mid February 1987)

DATES DESCRIPTION EXAMPLE

1990-1997 DOYY2Y1#### 135791234

1. DOY = day of the year (e.g. 135 = 14 May)

2. Y2Y1 = 2nd digit of year, 1st digit of year (e.g. 79 =1997)

DATES DESCRIPTION EXAMPLE

1998- 2000 YY WW #### 00281234

1. YY = year (e.g. 00 = 2000)

2. WW = week of the year (e.g. 28 = 2nd week in June)

DRIVER CODES:

Driver Manufacturing Date Codes: Example: 9429 = 1994, 29th week of the year (1994).

This numbering system is derived from the Electronics Industry Association (EIA) coding. The EIA did not issue Klipsch with an EIA prefix.

For further information on the EIA system, see: http://www.provide.net/~cfh/pots.html

Note: This site has additional manufacturers (including non-Klipsch components and an excellent resource for dating non-Klipsch equipment by the EIA "manufacturer & date-code" system.

Driver Manufacturer Codes:

Example: K-33-E would be the "Klipsch", part type 33 (15") woofer from Eminence. The suffix letter code generally referred to the Klipsch assigned origin/ manufacturer of the driver.

B = CTS (Chicago Telephone Supply), Brownsville TX

P = CTS in Paducah KY (woofers only)

R = Rola (an additional "R" either stamped or handwritten also indicated replacement (often seen on K22's and K- 24's)

D = K-77-D; From 2006 to the present. Essentially a K-77-F (see below) with an integral recessed mounting flange. Permits flush mounting of the tweeter from the rear, per the "Z" brackets for pre Feb 1983 Klipschorns (KH Update kit: part # 1006969)

F = Philippines supplier that purchased the EV tooling (e.g. K-77-F)

EV = Electro Voice (early K-33's e.g. "EV-15WK", also EV 1828 was used as the K-56 for Cornwall in 1974)

G = Atlas (for K-55-G for Cornwall 1981-1983)

J = Jensen (Also used for University drivers in mid- 1950s; e.g. K-5-J - University model 5A HF, and SAHF)

H = Heppner (K-52-H in Cornwall-II’s)

K = Klipsch (Pyle - Klipsch purchased Pyle and drivers were assembled in Hope Arkansas and at Pyle in Huntington, Indiana)

E = Eminence (Primarily woofers)

V = Atlas (see also notes below)

M = Electro Voice (also for the Eminence K-33-M in 1967)

X = Atlas (e.g. K-55-X)

Ti = Titanium series (new design with titanium diaphragms)

The V on the midrange & tweeters can also indicate 'video shielded'.

A significant number of "replacement" drivers, e.g. late model K-53's, K-76's will have no manufacturing code or date code, e.g. "blank" as in nothing at all.

On Heresy drivers, the number K53 indicates the driver/horn combo part number, which is a K52 driver and K701 horn.

Electro Voice also produced the "round magnet" T-35 tweeter, but later versions were simply labeled K-77. The first shipment of Electrovoice T-35 tweeters designated as the K-77 were received on 26 August 1959. The K-77 is first used in a Klipschorn with the serial number 1445 on 15 October, 1959.

Atlas produced the K-55X's (PD-5VH); and the PD-5VH is the K-55V (still available from Atlas and other vendors)

HERESY DRIVER TYPES BY APPLICATION (PREFIX IDENTIFIER):

1. Tweeter types:

K-76 Heresy-II

K-77 Heresy-I, Cornwall-I, Belle, La Scala, Klipschorn

K-79 Cornwall-II, Chorus-I

K-107 Heresy-III, Cornwall-III

2. Midrange types:

K-52 Cornwall-I (CW 1.5;a hybrid of the Cornwall-I and the Cornwall-II)

K-53 Forte-I, Heresy-I (late models), Heresy-II

K-53 Ti – Heresy-III, Cornwall-III

K-55 Klipschorn, La Scala, Belle, Cornwall, Heresy-I

3. Woofer types:

K-22 (types E, EF, K, and R) Heresy-I

K-24 Heresy-I (late models), Heresy-II

K-28 Heresy-III

3. Crossover types (Heritage only, there are others pre-1964):

C - Early Heresy

E - Heresy (E2 for 1983-1984 Heresy-Is with K-24 & K53/701's)

4. Klipsch Autotransformer types and values:

T2A(3110A) -3, -6, -9, -12db

T3A(3465-M) -6db

T4A(3485) -4db

T5A(3496) -6db

T7A(3504) -10db

T8A(3507) -8db

T9A(3540) -3db

T10A(3542) -9db

T11A -12db

5. Horn Types

K-700/701 – Heresy (all models), Cornwall-III

K-76 (Tweeter Horn) - Heresy II, Forte-I, early Cornwall-II (1.5)

K-79 Tractrix Horn - Heresy-III, Cornwall-III

K-1000 Heresy type "H", Cornwall-I (early models)

GRILLS & CLOTH CODES:

#03 = Cane

#13 = Heritage brown

#15 = White/black coarse weave

#17 = Duracrest, black, poly-olefin, stranded, coarse weave (Heritage only)

#18 = Duracrest, brown, poly-olefin, stranded, coarse weave (Heritage only)

Heritage grill frames for the Cornwall, La Scala, and Heresy were made from (a) "Masonite" fiberboard, or (B) a resin impregnated board (late model Cornwall & Heresy). The backings for the Klipschorn & Belle bass bins are 3/8" or ½" plywood, with a 'cut out' frame, with the cloth glued and stapled.

The new Reference series and all new Heritage series grills (except Klipschorn's) are retained by magnets. 60th Anniversary Klipschorns are also retained by magnets.

Grill "Velcro" varies between either 3/4" round or ½" x 3/4" rectangles. On Cornwall's (and seen on several Heresy's), the "motor board" Velcro pieces are sometimes stapled to the motor board.

LOGO DESIGNS

1. There were four basic designs:

(a) "Pie slice" in black/silver, clear/copper, clear/white (early pies), and copper/black: Sizes and fonts vary slightly as manufacturer/ contractors changed. The most recent (current for the Heritage series) is the copper/black pie slice, sometimes referred to as the small "Jubilee" pie.

(B) Copper with PWK logo and black lettering: This design varied slightly with the font & etching varying in distance and size.

© Copper/bronze with subdued lettering, and no "PWK" emblem on a background of horizontal stripes: These were generally seen in the mid-70s.

(d) In early production years, there was a clear plastic strip with "Klipschorn", and also "Rebel" in white script lettering.

4. The Heritage logos were/are secured to the grills, centered usually within ½" to 3/4" from the top edge of the grill with types b & c, and either on the upper left or upper right for type a (pie slices). The glue used is contact cement. The "d" type for the Klipschorn on the type "B" (collared), was held on the collar with two small pin nails. Current Heritage "pie slice" logos are secured with PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive).

HERESY PRODUCTION NOTES & TIME LINES:

1957: The Heresy is introduced as a center channel for the Klipschorn. It is the first Klipsch speaker that does not require corner placement. This model utilized the K-1000 midrange horn. These are rare, and one example in the Museum in Hope is the rarest of all the Klipsch Heritage speakers.

1957 - 1959: Both 8" and 12" woofer versions were produced during this period.

1967 - The H-700 is introduced in the now familiar format using a 12" K-22 woofer (There were several variants used E, EF, K) K-700 horn; K-55-V mid-range and the K-77 (T-35 type Alnico magnet) tweeter. From this date through the end of the model run in 1985, various networks were used: Type C, Type E and Type E-2. All were variations on the same design.

1972-1973: The Heresy's name is changed from H-700 to Heresy.

1983-1984: The K-24 woofer is substituted for the K-22, and during the last production of the Heresy-I, the midrange K-53/701 is substituted for the K-55/700.

1985: The Heresy II is introduced using a mid-range and tweeter driver set that, for the first time since the introduction of the H-700 differed from that of the Klipschorn. Component designations were: Woofer K-24-K, Midrange K-701 horn and K-52 driver (the mid range assembly was also stamped K-53 on the driver). The tweeter is K-75-K horn and K-76 driver. This was the first Heresy model to discontinue the use the traditional alpha numeric network designations (Type E-2). All of the drivers in the Heresy II were front mounted to reduce the diffraction effects caused by rear mounting and firing through the motor board.

May 2001: Finish, grill and riser variant options are reduced from nearly 100 to 10.

Sept 29, 2005: The Heresy III is introduced featuring increased sensitivity (3dB), Titanium mid-range and tweeter diaphragms, Tractrix tweeter horn and bi-wire inputs. Component designations are: Woofer K-28-E, Midrange K-53-Ti (K-701 horn and K-53-Ti driver), Tweeter K-107-Ti (K-79-T horn and K-100-Ti driver). Finish, grille and riser variations are further reduced from 10 to 3.

May 2006: The Heresy III midrange compression driver is sourced to a new supplier and the network is revised to compensate for the change.

HERESY-I & II - PARTS & RESOURCES:

Heresy-I; General:

Klipsch Factory Parts: There are no complete parts assemblies remaining for any pre-1983 Heresy-I's.

K-77 Tweeters - Bob Crites CT-125's, or replace diaphragms; some diaphragms were still available from Klipsch, but may no longer be available.

K-55 Midrange (Through 1983 only) - Atlas PD5VH's, or replace diaphragms; No factory parts available; contact Bob Crites for diaphragm replacement or new PD5VH's. The Selenium D250X can also be substituted, but requires attenuation either with a resistor or on the crossover. Contact Bob Crites for details. The Selenium can only be used with the K-700 metal horn.

K-700 midrange horn (Through 1983 only) - No longer available. Forum members often have spares.

K-53/701 midrange/ horn assembly (1983 through early 1985 only); There are a few 701 horns still available from Klipsch. There are no K-52 drivers available. Forum members often have spares. contact Bob Crites for diaphragm replacement. NOTE: You cannot substitute the K53/701 combo on a pre-83 motorboard. It will not fit due to the driver slot locations. You will have to replace the motor board. You can use the K-55/700 however on the late 83 through early 85 Heresy-I's.

K-22 woofer No longer available. Forum members often have spares. The K-24 can be substituted. Klipsch still has a few available. The better replacement is the either the K-28 from Klipsch, or the Bob Crites CW-1228 specifically designed as the replacement for the old K-22's and K-24's.

Type E/E2 Crossovers; No longer available. Forum members often have spares. Can be recapped, upgraded, modified (e.g. E/4500), etc. Numerous Forum members can either provide the service, or assist and advise you regarding capacitors and modificatons, etc.

Grills: No longer avilable; Forum members may have spares, or they can be made as per: http://forums.klipsch.com/forums/t/110684.aspx. Heresy II and Heresy-II grills cannot be exchanged as the driver "holes" are not in the same place.

Heresy-II: General:

The recommended "upgrade" is for the Klipsch Heresy-III driver & crossover "kit". It is designed for use only on the "square cup" (late 1986 and later) Heresy-II's. It can be used to upgrade the "round cup", but the owner will have to modify the rear panel to accept the new "cup".

Factory Parts: There are very few complete driver assemblies remaining. See further below.

K-76 Tweeters - There are a few driver only assemblies remaining at Klipsch parts, and some replacement diaphragms; but may no longer be available. Bob Crites has replacement diaphragms.

K-53/701 midrange/ horn assembly; There are a few plastic 701 horns still available from Klipsch. There are no K-52 drivers available. Forum members often have spares. contact Bob Crites for diaphragm replacement.

K-24 woofer; There are a very few still available from Klipsch parts. Forum members often have spares. The better replacement is the either the K-28 from Klipsch, or the Bob Crites CW-1228 specifically designed as the replacement for the old K-22's and K-24's.

Type Heresy-II Crossovers; Not available. Forum members often have spares. Can be recapped, upgraded, modified, etc. Numerous Forum members can either provide the service, or assist and advise regarding capacitors, etc.

Grills: No longer avilable; Forum members may have spares, or they can be made as per: http://forums.klipsch.com/forums/t/110684.aspx. Heresy II and Heresy-II grills cannot be exchanged as the driver "holes" are not in the same place. The Heresy-III grill can be subsituted for the Heresy-II as the driver "holes" are in the correct location. Contact Klipsch Parts for information, and/or pricing.

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The 55's in question were really "harsh" as you described.

I didn't say they were "harsh", just not as balanced, with the mids too forward. That could, of course, be adjusted, but I don't think many "turn down" the mids.

Bruce

That's exactly what John Albright's Heresy Crossover mod Less Bright thread is about.

Dropping the Mid and Tweet each one tap on the autoformer and adding a swamping resistor on the mid smooths things out a bunch for the H1.

http://community.klipsch.com/forums/t/21971.aspx

I rolled 3 different midhorns through my Heresy's last night.

The stock K-700, the Tractrix Mid with the Galaxy Cone driver, and a 4 sided Conical horn with a K55 attached.

With the K-700/K55 certain sounds such as the background strings on some Loreena McKennitt tracks sounded tinny and buzzy as though they were indeed coming from the other end of a tube, most likely due to the slow expansion rate of the exponential horn.

With the Conical horn/K55 combo these same sounds appeared more forward in the mix and easier to discern with a much more natural sound.

With the Tractrix horn/Galaxy combo the sound was more relaxed, most likely due to the lower output of the 5" driver.

Yet still very natural sounding.

I think I'm probably going to end up altering my motorboard for a conical horn with the K55 and CT125 in a horizontal(sort of) layout.

Although I think I'll be trying one of Yuichi Arai's A-480 horns as well.

-Josh

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Interestingly, mods to the Heresy-I don't always sound good in a particular room. What sounded "ok" in one room, turned into phenomenal in another room. Room dynamics and placement will always very noticeably alter what one hears.

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The sad thing is that Groomie typed that off the top of his head.

I was thinking the same thing.

It must be a 'great minds thinking alike' kinda moment..... [Y]

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