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jvs1670

Hanging Heresey II's

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I want to hang my speakers flush on my rear wall to use them as back surrounds in my system. I've used french cleats on smaller speakers before and supposedly they can handle weights higher than what the Heresey's weigh. Just wondering if the cabs of the speakers can handle being attached in this way or does someone have a better method?

Thanks.

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I cannot answer your question as to the french cleat method of hanging Heresy's.

IMO, a shelf may be the best way to go, unless you are thinking about aiming them down due to room size. Acoustically, I think it is better to aim them straight out, and to have the horns just above ear level when seated. This way, you have the widest sweet spot, you can change the toe in and the seats themselvs don't block the sound. I'm thinking the woofers at ear level would be very effective. In the corners would be the most effective. If you had another Heresy, you could put it in the center of the rear wall, and make a huge improvement in your soundstage. Your AVR would need to be able to support a 6.1 speaker configuration.

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If you used bolts to hold the speaker piece of the French cleat to the back of the Heresy, it should be ok. To be safe, a piece of metal coming down and under the edge of the back of the cab would be better.

Bruce

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Thanks for the input. I bought cleats that can support 100lbs each, they really don't look all that strong or massive but that should easily handle the job safely. Now of course I need to finish the bottoms like the rest of the speakers since I skipped that step thinking I would never see the bottom. I'll get pics when I'm done.

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I would check the back of the speakers both inside and out and see that it is sealed tight and nothing is loose (especially the back). Also, I'd attach cleats at the top and at the bottom for extra safety and to eliminate potential rocking.

Show us the pics when you are done!

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I used the cleats on a speaker about the same size and weight of the Heresy, I don't know what material they used my speakers were mdf. I just used some good wood screws, and one cleat. If you don't plan on selling the Heresies or don't want to ruin the backs. You could make some new backs store the old ones. Drill holes in positions of the holes of the cleats and use t nuts on the back side for some #10 or 1/4" bolts to mount the cleat to, that would hold. I know PSG did something quit nice if you have a room behind were you mount them what he did would work, as well as angling them down 15 degrees as high as you can. Or you can make a french cleat with a 15 degree angle. I think someone else did some thing like that. I hope all that makes since, I know I am kind of rambling.

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No room behind to sink them in but I do like the idea of hanging them at a 15 degree angle while still using the cleats.....any idea how to actually do that? Pics?

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Height-wise, it's usually recommended that surround speakers should be about six feet from the floor. This is higher than ear level, but should give better sound. I've noticed that lots of surround-type sounds (explosion echoes, rainfall, etc.) are the kind of thing that would normally originate well above ground level, so that may be why that height is suggested.

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No room behind to sink them in but I do like the idea of hanging them at a 15 degree angle while still using the cleats.....any idea how to actually do that? Pics?

Heres the one I was thinking of plus a couple other links that give you ideas.

http://forums.klipsch.com/forums/p/56046/542352.aspx#542352

http://forums.klipsch.com/forums/t/57909.aspx?PageIndex=1

Hope this helps.

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They need to be supported on the bottom, so they won't pull apart. Hanging them without this support will strain them, particularly after you run many movie explosions and thunder storms through them to loosen them up. It's amazing how much of this impactive sound occurs above the THX / Audyssey recommended 80 Hz crosover.

Somewhere there is a picture of several Heresy IIs being used as surrounds at Klipsch -- they all are supported from the bottom by shelves with a lip coming up a couple of inches to support the sides, and it looks like they are attached on the back, as well. They are pointed slightly down at the audience.

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They need to be supported on the bottom, so they won't pull apart. Hanging them without this support will strain them...

That's why I mentioned the same thing above. Never hurts to have it repeated. [:)]

Bruce

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If you intend to have the Heresys HIGH UP, near the ceiling, then you may want to install a shelf, angled slightly downward with a center brace under it, and large enough to have a LIP around its front and sides to "cradle" the cabinet's front and side edges

The downward angle of the firing of the speaker can be towards the head height at the listening position "sweet spot" (front plane of cabinet tangent to radius from head height), if so desired. If the downward cabinet angle has too much slope, then you can take a couple screw-hooks and chain, put the hook into the center of the back cabinet edge closest to the ceiling...with another screw-hook into the wall behind it (preferably into a stud, if possible), and the chain connecting the two hooks taughtly after the box is on the shelf...this will keep it from possibly tipping forward and off the shelf. I have flown Heresys like this numerous times and it works great, with minimal damage to the cabs.

You can put some thin peel'n'stick cushions, like "grippers", in the corners of the shelf, and some small felt pads spaced inside the lips on the edges of the shelf, to protect the finish on the speaker cabs...especially a good idea if the speakers are inverted!

I also recommend having the cabs UPSIDE DOWN, with the woofer closest to the ceiling when they are up high...this allows the ceiling/wall corner to replicate floor positioning for max acoustical reflection effect of the speaker...thereby punching the bottom-end sound up somewhat, and increasing the "presence" and soundstage.

MOUNTING inverted K-horns in ceiling corners works pretty well, too...depending on the structural integrity of the ceiling-to-wall construction.

I suggest experimenting with the downward angle to get the best results before you make the final fixed version of the shelf...you can do this by making a shelf with a hinge on back edge to experiment with...then put up the permanent solid one based upon the best angle found.

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After looking at all the info and suggestions I decided to still just mount them flush with no tilting down or toe angles. I do appreciate all the input you guys gave me, thanks. My final question is regarding position of the speaker itself. I need to mount them high to avoid them intruding on my room space so should I mount them straight up in their normal positon or invert them upside down. Looks like the top of the speaker would be at a height of about 6'8", so if I flip them upside down that would put the tweeter down at a little over 5'4" off of the floor. Upside down will definitely put the tweeter and mid closer to ear height in all seated positions obviously so this shouldi be more desirable I would think.

Or I could mount sideways, any disadvantages to this? Top side would go towards middle of wall to keep the highs towards center right? I'm really looking for this to sound good with movies or sporting events........anytime I want just music I really wont even have these on most of the time, not sure if that makes a difference.

John

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My previous post said:

..."I also recommend having the cabs UPSIDE DOWN, with the woofer closest to the ceiling when they are up high...this allows the ceiling/wall corner to replicate floor positioning for max acoustical reflection effect of the speaker...thereby punching the bottom-end sound up somewhat, and increasing the "presence" and soundstage."

You may also want to reconsider the mounting flush to the wall, which will automatically negate your ability to adjust the cabinet distance from the wall for optimal wall to cabinet spacing. This is one of the more important abilities to make adjustment for your room's accoustical deficiencies.

Your call, tho!

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HDBR....yes that suggestion made sense to go with it upside down, never even thought of it until I saw your post, thanks.

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