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What kind of Heresy's do I have?


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heresy 11's didn't come out until late 1985 so you can do the math. yours are 1984

also welcome to the forum and congrats on a beautiful set of speakers with cane grills

guessing the label says H-OO for Heresy - Oak Oil

 

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Thanks. I'm pretty excited about them. I was confused because the date in the serial number was telling me Heresy I but the box said Heresy II. I bought them from the original owner, who said he custom ordered them and picked them up from the factory, and he didn't mention getting a replacement box. 

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On a related note, these speakers have been stored since 1994. Is there anything I should be wary of electronically? They sound fine to me, but I haven't really turned them up yet. Planning on a bit of Watco Rejuvenating oil for the cabinets, but everything appears to be in excellent shape. 

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i recommend just listening to them for awhile and later contacting bob crites @ critesspeakers.com he can help you with a crossover refresh.

the main thing is that the tweeter- midrange and woofer all work when you put your ear up to them. the tweeter is the hardest to hear. you can stuff a towel in the midrange horn to block it off so you can hear the tweeter working. the other 2 are easy to hear working

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Thanks. I feel like I got lucky. I thought I was getting Heresy II's. Seems like people on here  prefer the I. I'm loving how they sound so far. Can't imagine how awesome they will sound after I give Mr. Crites a call for crossovers and possibly some titanium diaphragms for the tweeters. 

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Thanks. I feel like I got lucky. I thought I was getting Heresy II's. Seems like people on here  prefer the I. I'm loving how they sound so far. Can't imagine how awesome they will sound after I give Mr. Crites a call for crossovers and possibly some titanium diaphragms for the tweeters. 

My Heresys are 1978 models and have never been touched. The Crites products are factory spec. If they sound good leave them alone unless you just want to tinker.


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They look spectacular.  Don’t get your hopes up about titanium diaphragms for your K77/T35 tweeters.  If you had H2s, yes to titanium, but not Heresy.  I have some of each; they all sound great, but none looks as nice as yours.  If they were mine, I wouldn’t trade them for H2s.

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8 hours ago, saintsfan2007 said:

I see you went with the CT-125 tweeters for your Heresy I's. Would you recommend that

When I bought my Heresys, one tweeter was blown.  I ordered a pair the CT125's instead of the K-77 because of the good feedback I had read on the forums.  Never really heard my Heresys with two good stock tweeters.  No regrets in that decision.  At that time I also had the crossovers refreshed.

 

8 hours ago, saintsfan2007 said:

would you keep it stock if you had to do it over again?

Not necessarily, very pleased with decision. 

 

If your pair are sounding good(they sure look good), don't mess with them unless you have too.  On the other hand, if you want them to be trouble free for the next 20 years, go ahead and have the crossover rebuilt and any other changes you deem necessary.  Ask previous owner if crossovers had been recapped.

 

Bill

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IMO,  many of the changes in H2s and H3s were made to address production costs, rather than to achieve sonic improvements.  The short answer, as stated before, enjoy them as they are.  Avoid the urge to “upgrade” just because changes are possible.

 

IMO, newer Heritage manage to sound as good, or better, than older Heritage despite the switch to more plastic and MDF, not because of it.

 

Regarding K77 (T35) vs. CT125, not everyone agrees that CT125s are an improvement, at least, not enough of an improvement to justify the expense if the original tweeters are functioning properly.  I bought a pair of like new CT125s from this forum’s @Allan Songer, a resident expert on Jazz.  Allan sold them to me because he preferred the original tweeters.  I ended up selling them to Michael Colter, @colterphoto1, because my son preferred the K77s and I didn’t perceive a definite improvement to justify replacing properly functioning K77s.  

 

Properly functioning is an important part of the equation.  Electro Voice stopped making T35 (K77) many years ago.  For a time, Klipsch had them made off-shore.  Eventually that became impractical.  Getting a suitable replacement diaphragm for T35/K77 is now problematic.  The only one I would trust is that sold by Bob Ctires, @BEC

 

When I first saw the plastic horn on the H2 tweeter, I thought it looked cheap compared to the metal horn of the K77/T35.  I still think it looks cheap, but I recognize that it performs as well as, or better than K77.  In fact, my daily driver DIY @ClaudeJ1 inspired “Super Heresys” have H2 tweeters with titanium diaphragms from Bob Crites.

 

IMO, the shift away from multiple ply plywood through inferior plywood to MDF was done for cost reasons, not to achieve sonic improvements.  That is not to say that modern Heritage don’t sound great, they do, but it is, IMO, despite some of the construction compromises, not because of them.

 

I recently “won” a pair of H2s on eBay.  The seller shipped both speakers in a single box filled with foam peanuts.  A consequence was loose squawker horns, due to being jarred in transit.  Look closely at the 5 plys in the H2 motorboard and compare that to the multiple plys visible in the end grain of my then unfinished DIY “Supers.”  Granted they are made from Baltic Birch plywood at nearly $100 for a 4 x 8 sheet, which, according to Andy, @HDBRbuilder, Klipsch didn’t use.  As I understand it, Klipsch sourced custom made multiply from Georgia Pacific that was much closer to what’s in my DIYs than to what you see in the H2 photos.  Understand that repairing the stripped holes with toothpicks and Tite-Bond will result in excellent sounding speakers.  That result will be despite the move to cheaper materials, not because of it.

 

The bottom line, enjoy your original Heresys as they are.  The only thing I would change would be the capacitors, which will be mounted on a proper plywood board, rather than crammed onto a plastic terminal cup, as in the H2s.  As always, YMMV, and feel free to send a PM if you want to discuss.

 

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The biggest problem with Baltic Birch plywood from a production stand-point is the wear and tear on cutting tools...router bits, saw blades, etc....along with difficulty to penetrate with fasteners such as staples, brads and finishing nails from guns.  As for sonic superiority over standard cabinet grade plywood, the Baltic birch has it hands down.

 

For the DIY types, Baltic birch it is a better option than standard cabinet-grade plywood, OR MDF...especially if one will be painting the wood or veneering it himself. 

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