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JFHSQT

Blew my La Scala II tweeters - how big of a deal?

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I would agree with those suggesting that you reach out to Klipsch.  Though their warranty does not include coverage for damage arising from abuse (that it was unintended is beside the point), it would cost them next to nothing to keep happy a customer who bought their speakers new and from an authorized dealer.  I'm betting they'll happily oblige.

 

I would NOT recommend replacing the damaged tweeter with anything but the OEM part.  I can't understand the thinking that some aftermarket vendor has come up with an improvement over what Klipsch has designed and engineered.  Plus, if you need to sell them, I think it would hurt resale to modify them.  Keep 'em stock - that's my $.02.

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Bob Crites and simply speakers sells klipsch parts . But Klipsch should send new diaphragms because the crossover should have protected 8000 dollar speakers I think.

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9 minutes ago, ODS123 said:

I can't understand the thinking that some aftermarket vendor has come up with an improvement over what Klipsch has designed and engineered.

Ever see the FR and impulse response plots comparing the K-77 to the B&C de-120? Ever listen to a pair?

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2 minutes ago, ricktate said:

Bob Crites and simply speakers sells klipsch parts . But Klipsch should send new diaphragms because the crossover should have protected 8000 dollar speakers I think.

I agree with that. The tweeter protection failed - that's not the owner's fault.

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These are La Scala 2's (the system can't be very old) The diaphragm was accidentally fried. Yet, a bunch of you want the OP to spend a few hundred to "upgrade" the entire tweeter.  This makes no sense. Fix them, enjoy them, and be done with it.

 

BTW, the crossover may require alteration to accommodate a different brand of tweeter. Are you guys now going to suggest the OP "do this by ear"?

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5 minutes ago, PrestonTom said:

...a bunch of you want the OP to spend a few hundred to "upgrade" the entire tweeter.

One person made the suggestion after the OP asked.

 

4 minutes ago, PrestonTom said:

BTW, the crossover may require alteration to accommodate a different brand of tweeter.

I already pointed out that potential problem.

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Is simply replacing the diaphragm any more difficult than replacing the entire tweeter?

 

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Yes.

 

Since you're not Mr. fixit, you can remove it, and send it to Bob for repair.

 

You should definitely call Klipsch first and see if you get lucky. You will need the serial number of your loudspeaker. 

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8 minutes ago, Deang said:

Yes.

 

Since you're not Mr. fixit, you can remove it, and send it to Bob for repair.

 

You should definitely call Klipsch first and see if you get lucky. You will need the serial number of your loudspeaker. 

 

Thanks, I called the dealer to get some feedback from them before contacting Klipsch (they are only 6 months old), and will call Bob as well to see what he thinks.

 

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Also, if these speakers are within the warranty period, wouldn't replacing the original tweeter with a non OEM part void the remaining warranty??  I can understand tinkering with different tweeters, etc.. in a 20 year old pair for which the OEM part is no longer available, but no way in a pair of speakers that are still in production.

 

I would be skeptical of claims that replacing the original tweeter w/ an aftermarket part really improves the sound.   I think that once someone has gone to the trouble of replacing it they will naturally be inclined to believe it sounds better even if it doesn't.  I see big potential for placebo effect.

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8 minutes ago, JFHSQT said:

 

Thanks, I called the dealer to get some feedback from them before contacting Klipsch (they are only 6 months old), and will call Bob as well to see what he thinks.

 

Don't forget to physically inspect the network when you remove the tweeter. A burned up polyswitch or resistor would be pretty hard to miss.

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Dean, or whoever else, doesn't it seem strange that a polyswitch would have not reacted quickly enough to protect the tweeter. I thought were capable of kicking in due to transients and  turn-on thumps. 

 

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OK so I talked to Michael at Crites, and it seems like the CT 120 would require modification to my cabinet anyway, so not a good fit. As others have suggested, he also cautioned against voiding a warranty in a 6 month old speaker system... so it seems like the best route is to just go back to the dealer and see if they can negotiate replacement diaphragm under warranty and do the service work there. 

 

Which means I'll be missing my awesome speakers for at least several weeks if not longer. :(

Local Craigslist has a pair of JBL L5s for sale. I wonder if those would be a good pinch hitter for the time being. 

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1 minute ago, PrestonTom said:

Dean, or whoever else, doesn't it seem strange that a polyswitch would have not reacted quickly enough to protect the tweeter. I thought were capable of kicking in due to transients and  turn-on thumps. 

 

I am curious about that too since that is one of the claimed protections for pro gear.

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45 minutes ago, JFHSQT said:

Which means I'll be missing my awesome speakers for at least several weeks if not longer. :(

 

There has been a lot of suggestions, guessing and assuming all weekend in this thread when IMHO you should give your dealer and Klipsch a chance to help resolve your problem. 

 

Maybe you can even continue to use them till repair parts can be shipped to you or the dealer.

 

By the way even protection circuits have limits depending on the type of overload pulse they might have encountered and might not be able to protect in 100% of all cases.

 

miketn

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19 minutes ago, PrestonTom said:

Dean, or whoever else, doesn't it seem strange that a polyswitch would have not reacted quickly enough to protect the tweeter. I thought were capable of kicking in due to transients and  turn-on thumps. 

 

We once had a really good thread about tweeter protection - some were adamant that a polyswitch was not always fast enough. DJK claimed auto bulbs worked the best. If I'm remembering right, he also preferred the zener diodes over the polyswitch.

 

When the polyswitch tripped, current would have transferred to the resistor, and it apparently failed too.

 

 

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@JFHSQT Whereabouts do you live? Maybe someone from here lives close to you and would be willing to give you a hand.

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Thanks Miketn and Dean, I think there's some good news here. I just spoke with the service department at Audiotronics here in Roanoke (where I bought the speakers) and he thinks Klipsch will send a new diaphragm under warranty with no issues, in just a few days from AR. It sounds like I'll just be able to bring the doghouse into the service dept and they can swap the diaphragm there, so this may not be as long-term an issue as I had feared. 

 

Although now I am kind of curious about those JBL L5s, haha.

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One idea just occurred to me, wondering if this is feasible or not.

 

Since I do not biwire my La Scala IIs, I'm wondering if (until I get the tweeter swapped out) it would be possible to remove the biwire jumpers on the La Scalas and plug one set of speakers out from my Luxman L509X into the "Low" speaker posts on the La Scalas and plug another set of speaker outs from the Luxman into my RP-150Ms... and using the RP-150ms for the highs. 

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Love your integrated choice, by the way!!  The Luxman L509X is beautiful and feature packed.  There are way too few integrated amps with bass, treble, mono switch.  ..And for no particularly good reason, I might add.  ..Well, there is a reason often cited - that they deteriorate the signal - but this is nonsense in my view.  I view them as essential features to make it possible to enjoy ALL recorded music, including songs that need slight tonal adjustment or Stereo mix defeated.

 

I would have bought the very same amp had I not bought my MA600.  ,..I'm sure I would have been just as happy.

 

 

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