Jump to content

1979 LaScala (Asking For Advice)


Recommended Posts

Sup peoples!


I guess it’s customary to mention that this is my first post, but I’m a long time lurker. Just recently acquired a pair of ‘79 LaScala. Our first Klipsch pair. Been drooling over Klipsch and Altec for a while and the opportunity finally came.
 

I’ve been really enjoying these speakers so far, and I plan to continue enjoying them as is for a while. Big BUT, I want to plan and scheme potential tweaks and mods to help them get comfy with their new home and friends. I kinda understand the few camps around upgrading vs restoring vs not fixing if it ain’t broke. I guess I’m in the tweaker camp with one foot in the restoration camp. 
 

These things are og, and sound great, but compared to my previous speakers, they can be a bit bloated with certain music, vocals can be a tad bit veiled, squawks in the face at times, and low end needs help from heaven above. My ears may just need to get used to to them.
 

For context, we listen to a lot of vinyl and digital music through a Schiit DAC, tube preamp and monoblocks. Running balanced mostly. My turntable doesn’t have the black background it used to, thought I had it made. Generally we listen to music with real low end often enough to realize it’s missing. I have 2 subs running in mono, still having issues with placement and blending them with LaScalas. I now realize how low my previous speakers went compared to LaScalas (I had an idea of that getting into it). I fell in love with LaScala first with my eyes, and then more so after listening to a local pair very frequently. Tripped out on how lovely/lively they sounded, how detailed they are. That pair is an early 80s I believe, and sounded really well in it’s large and open environment (not a home, more like a warehouse). 
 

First thing I tried was detaching a diode on the AA hoping it’d help the perceived veiled vocals. A/b-ing them made me think it made a slight difference. I believe I‘m becoming a bit more accustomed to them since a lot of my initial concerns are easing. I a/b’ed my older pair with the monoblocks, and damn, it made me forgive a lot of my initial beefs with our LaScala.

I decided to ask for advice after much hesitation. I’ve been diggin through this forum exhaustively, as well as others, to get tips around these speakers. Mind boggled. Not tryna start any more beefs between camps, plenty of that in our politics, just tryna get some advice. All that to say, I’m interested in seeing how I can adjust, improve, and accustom myself to them. 


A couple things I’m considering: new caps, checking the squawker rubber gaskets, also wondering if using a couple pieces of pure wool insulation in the dog house may help the bloatedness. Also considering a tone control as a bandaid, seems cheaper. 

 

Any advice which way to go? I’m open minded. I feel like I’m on the shore with my boat (LaScala) and staring out to open waters. If being vague, it’s because I’m curious to hear peoples ideas in hopes that it sparks an interest within me. I’m hoping some of the info I shared helps with ideas. Here’s a pic for more context. Thanks in advance, hope all on here are well.
 

Salud,

E

 

image.thumb.jpeg.823b62243a78a4a5cc5b1c8c5365ca28.jpeg

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Congratulations E... and welcome to the forum.

Ive never heard someone say that a properly functioning La Scala LF as being bloated... it generally should be one of Klipsch's BEST performing low frequency image... even if it doesn't extend as low as other speakers.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, estelegalize said:

A couple things I’m considering: new caps, checking the squawker rubber gaskets,

Yes, I highly recommend Jantzen  or Audiocap PPT Theta caps from Parts Express, or, if money is no object Vcaps ODAM.

 

https://www.parts-express.com/electronic-parts/capacitors/film-and-foil-crossover-capacitors

 

https://www.v-cap.com/odam-capacitors.php

 

Yes to the squawker gaskets, from Crites.

 

NO to the insulation in the doghouse.

 

Have fun with your project.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone, happy to be here.

 

1 hour ago, Schu said:

Congratulations E... and welcome to the forum.

Ive never heard someone say that a properly functioning La Scala LF as being bloated... it generally should be one of Klipsch's BEST performing low frequency image... even if it doesn't extend as low as other speakers.

Maybe bloated is the wrong adjective. Boomy maybe, I'm not hip with audio terminology. I got the idea for the insulation because of (what I think is) the upper bass, maybe lower mid range being very forward.

 

 

1 hour ago, jimjimbo said:

Yes, I highly recommend Jantzen  or Audiocap PPT Theta caps from Parts Express, or, if money is no object Vcaps ODAM.

 

https://www.parts-express.com/electronic-parts/capacitors/film-and-foil-crossover-capacitors

 

https://www.v-cap.com/odam-capacitors.php

 

Yes to the squawker gaskets, from Crites.

 

NO to the insulation in the doghouse.

 

Have fun with your project.

Thanks for the recommendations! Was really hoping for that, I'll check out those links.

 

Any chance a new compression driver would help? I called Crites and was turned onto the A-55-G/2. If I hear the lower mid range being too forward is that coming from the woofer in the dog house? Maybe placement is the issue. They're pushed back against that wall, pivoted a bit so that those horns don't center on my face.

 

Thanks again.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try experimenting with placement. LS's don't HAVE to be in a corner, or against a wall, like Cornwall's or KHorns. Maybe move them out into the room and see if that helps tame the issue that you're having. I've not heard any boominess from my all stock '77's. I run them with a pair of McIntosh MC30 amps and while I've never had a need for subs like a lot of other with LS's, it's not because of too much bass. It just sounds right, although certainly different and not as thick as my Cornwalls.

 

Anyway, enjoy the ride. They're fantastic speakers.

 

EDIT: Oh I see Jim basically advised the same as me a few seconds before. Great minds...😁

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Boomy or bloated might be related to another issue as opposed to the speakers design. check those caps first and go from there.

I also agree moving them away from a boundary layer is a good idea, that is how I have run my La Scalas.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, jimjimbo said:

If I may ask, what drivers are currently installed? And, I would pull them out from against the wall.

I assume they're the og drivers, but they have the push pin K-55Vs. Pulling the out may pose an issue. The room they're in is a long rectangle about 450 sq ft, shooting sound long ways. The center of the speakers are about 10.5 ft apart, and my couch is about 10.5 ft away from the speakers. I can't push my couch any farther back (at the moment), moving the speakers forward will push them too close to listening position. Hopefully soon I'll be able to move the room around to pull these out.

 

Anyone recommend tone control? Is that a blasphemous question?

 

23 minutes ago, Schu said:

Boomy or bloated might be related to another issue as opposed to the speakers design. check those caps first and go from there.

I also agree moving them away from a boundary layer is a good idea, that is how I have run my La Scalas.

Regarding caps. Is matching necessary? I see that some sellers offer matching services for an extra fee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even a brief experiment away from the walls will at least give you some idea if they are making the boominess worse, or having little/no effect. You can always move them back.  You might also experiment with moving your other speakers away from the LS's, at least just to hear what effect giving the LS's some space might have.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the original configuration, the LaScala midrange is hot (level is high compared to the rest of the system). I suggest lowering the midrange -3dB to start. 

 

As far as buying a new driver to replace the K55, I would suggest against. The K400 horn is the problem in the midrange, not the driver. Since you are contemplating modding the LaScala, I would suggest experimenting with stuffing the doghouse to see how it changes the sound. If you don't like the result, take it out. 

 

I stuffed my modded LaScala (with eggcrate foam) and prefer it that way. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, svberger said:

Even a brief experiment away from the walls will at least give you some idea if they are making the boominess worse, or having little/no effect. You can always move them back.  You might also experiment with moving your other speakers away from the LS's, at least just to hear what effect giving the LS's some space might have.

Good ideas. I'll try this. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Curious_George said:

In the original configuration, the LaScala midrange is hot (level is high compared to the rest of the system). I suggest lowering the midrange -3dB to start. 

 

As far as buying a new driver to replace the K55, I would suggest against. The K400 horn is the problem in the midrange, not the driver. Since you are contemplating modding the LaScala, I would suggest experimenting with stuffing the doghouse to see how it changes the sound. If you don't like the result, take it out. 

 

I stuffed my modded LaScala (with eggcrate foam) and prefer it that way. 

I've read it's possible lowering the midrange by altering the AA network. I've never soldered caps together, but ain't afraid to try. Can this be accomplished in a similar way with tone control? I'm hesitant to damp the K400 horn with material since it would seem a pain to undo.

 

Regarding stuffing the dog house; would it be recommend to seal with silicone once opened?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, estelegalize said:

I've read it's possible lowering the midrange by altering the AA network. I've never soldered caps together, but ain't afraid to try. Can this be accomplished in a similar way with tone control? I'm hesitant to damp the K400 horn with material since it would seem a pain to undo.

 

Regarding stuffing the dog house; would it be recommend to seal with silicone once opened?

If you have an EQ, you could EQ the midrange down a bit. 

 

Damping the k400 horn externally won't do much... it is the horn design that gives it it's signature sound. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the tweeters are rear mounted flush mounting it will be an improvement.

Seal the doghouse with the foam tape used for sealing drivers.

Crossbraces between doghouse and sidewalls can be a good idea.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, estelegalize said:

I've read it's possible lowering the midrange by altering the AA network. I've never soldered caps together, but ain't afraid to try. Can this be accomplished in a similar way with tone control? I'm hesitant to damp the K400 horn with material since it would seem a pain to undo.

 

Regarding stuffing the dog house; would it be recommend to seal with silicone once opened?

Yes, replace the 13uf cap with a 6.8uf cap, and change the tap on the autoformer from tap 4 to tap 3.

 

Put blue painters tape on the K400, and then apply dynamat.  Contrary to other statements here, it works quite well.  I have done it many times, and it makes a difference.

 

Recommend against stuffing the doghouse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One factor that might be contributing to the "bloated/boomy" sound you are hearing are the "hard" surfaces of your listening room, ie the walls and floor.  You might try laying down an area rug and maybe a put up a couple of wall hangings to absorb some of the reflected sound coming out of your speakers.  I'm sure others on this forum can explain/resolve these issues in better detail than I....

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another advise, if you ever have a reason like the boominess after any crossover refresh and listening for abit, to enter the doghouse, would remove any and all stuffing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, estelegalize said:

 

 

Any advice which way to go? I’m open minded. I feel like I’m on the shore with my boat (LaScala) and staring out to open waters. If being vague, it’s because I’m curious to hear peoples ideas in hopes that it sparks an interest within me. I’m hoping some of the info I shared helps with ideas. Here’s a pic for more context. Thanks in advance, hope all on here are well.
 

 

 

I would not touch anything  since your crossovers are very old and  your best option is to buy new klipsch original capacitors ,for your speakers , once this is done

this would restore the klipsch sound and you will be very pleased

 

the klipsch Crossover repair Center for the USA sell  upgrade kits for your crossovers  :

 

@JEM Performance  JEM Performance Audio  (412) 401-6915       Email   theaudioroom@verizon.net 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...