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Building an amp (for those who are curious!)

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Great video, I have one question for an issue I run into every now and then.  When I tin my soldering iron, for the most time it sticks to the soldering iron with  no problem.  Recently I purchased a new tip and the solder seems to want to roll right off of the tip.  Any idea why this is?

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12 minutes ago, The Dude said:

Great video, I have one question for an issue I run into every now and then.  When I tin my soldering iron, for the most time it sticks to the soldering iron with  no problem.  Recently I purchased a new tip and the solder seems to want to roll right off of the tip.  Any idea why this is?

Do you clean it each time prior to applying solder?

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2 minutes ago, The Dude said:

Yes

Crappy tip material?  I have no idea.  Maybe a more experienced solder slinger will chime in.  I haven't had that issue.

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31 minutes ago, The Dude said:

Great video, I have one question for an issue I run into every now and then.  When I tin my soldering iron, for the most time it sticks to the soldering iron with  no problem.  Recently I purchased a new tip and the solder seems to want to roll right off of the tip.  Any idea why this is?

use a steel or brass brush on the tip.

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The problem is common with too hot an iron. You will have trouble transfering heat to the leads you want to solder when the iron corrodes over that way. The tip corrodes over real quickly when the iron is too hot. Tips wear out quickly as well.  As previous poster said wire or steel brush will clean. Sandpaper will also do. Lower you temperature and your soldering experience will be much more enjoyable. I have been using this cheap station for almost a year now daily. Works perfectly fine for me. When the tip turns grey too quickly I turn the heat down. 

https://www.parts-express.com/stahl-tools-stssvt-variable-temperature-soldering-iron-station--374-100

 

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I've read that Bottlehead designs, while affordable, are plagued with high noise floors and background hiss.

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2 hours ago, wdecho said:

The problem is common with too hot an iron. You will have trouble transfering heat to the leads you want to solder when the iron corrodes over that way. The tip corrodes over real quickly when the iron is too hot. Tips wear out quickly as well.  As previous poster said wire or steel brush will clean. Sandpaper will also do. Lower you temperature and your soldering experience will be much more enjoyable. I have been using this cheap station for almost a year now daily. Works perfectly fine for me. When the tip turns grey too quickly I turn the heat down. 

https://www.parts-express.com/stahl-tools-stssvt-variable-temperature-soldering-iron-station--374-100

 

Very similar to the one I use.

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3 hours ago, Schu said:

I've read that Bottlehead designs, while affordable, are plagued with high noise floors and background hiss.

 

I've heard several bottleheads and this has not been the case from my experience. I've heard stereomor and the 300b set. Perhaps it is an individual build issue?
 

 

 

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14 hours ago, The Dude said:

Great video, I have one question for an issue I run into every now and then.  When I tin my soldering iron, for the most time it sticks to the soldering iron with  no problem.  Recently I purchased a new tip and the solder seems to want to roll right off of the tip.  Any idea why this is?

Pick up a plain stainless steel pot scrubber at the supermarket.  Heat the iron, gently wipe the tip with it, tin the tip at the beginning of each soldering session, and wipe off the excess with the scrubber.  Use it prior to making each connection, and apply a very tiny amount of solder to the tip before touching it to the connection point.  Are you using lead-free solder or the usual tin/lead?

 

 

Maynard

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11 minutes ago, tube fanatic said:

Pick up a plain stainless steel pot scrubber at the supermarket.  Heat the iron, gently wipe the tip with it,

Other than what others have said it this post, this is a newer tip for me.  Glad to hear this.

 

11 minutes ago, tube fanatic said:

tin the tip at the beginning of each soldering session, and wipe off the excess with the scrubber.  Use it prior to making each connection, and apply a very tiny amount of solder to the tip before touching it to the connection point

This has been my practice for the past couple years and it has proven good, glad I have at least been doing that right.

11 minutes ago, tube fanatic said:

Are you using lead-free solder or the usual tin/lead?

Not sure, I do know its silver solder from radio shack.  I want to say something like 60/40 rosin core.

 

Good stuff and great tips here folks, thanks for the tips.

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Are you referring to the color of the solder or is it silver solder? Leave silver solder and lead free solder to more experienced. You want 60/40 lead, tin. 

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14 hours ago, seti said:

 

I've heard several bottleheads and this has not been the case from my experience. I've heard stereomor and the 300b set. Perhaps it is an individual build issue?
 

 

 

more than likely true... but that is always the case.

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8 hours ago, Schu said:

more than likely true... but that is always the case.

 

Now a friend did buy the bottlehead sex amp kit and it never worked properly

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I've been using the same tip for over a year, and I do A LOT of soldering.

 

All of the tips I've ever used, for both my Weller and my Hakko, are pre-tinned. You only add a bit of solder to aid in heat transfer. I solder at 800 degrees, use clips on the leads (heat sink), and then get in and get out. So, I'm curious what everyone else here is using.

 

Don't understand why anyone would choose to use 60/40 for electronics work, since it has a slushy/pasty stage before solidifying, which increases the chances of a cold solder joint. 63/37 is normally preferred, since it's eutectic, and goes from liquid to solid almost instantaneously.

 

I've been soldering for almost 20 years, and I've never had to "scrub" a tip to get solder to "stick".

 

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I thought I was soldering too hot but it works for me 700ish. I might kick it up and use heat sinks to see if that helps. When I got my Hakko I bought 12 tips. I got a thin curved tip and it has been my favorite soldering top. I need to order a few more.

 

I find this fascinating.

 

 

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I like Dean have been using the same tip on my cheap Stahl station for a year and it looks as good as new and have never scrubbed it with wire or sandpaper. But my Weller 40 watt will need scrubbing after a few hours to get solder to stick and the tips wear out after a few months of use. I now use my 40 watt Weller only for 16 gauge or larger wire. I also have an extremely large soldering iron mechanics use that will solder any wire. 

 

Certainly not the best but definitely the best deal on an iron or station. 

 

https://www.parts-express.com/stahl-tools-stssvt-variable-temperature-soldering-iron-station--374-100

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I ran my Stahl with the same tip around 700, one day it quit working.  So I replaced, only used it once since, that's the time I had the issue.  I will double check the type, I am pretty sure it silver solder as I thought someone had recommended it.  I never had any issues soldering with it.  Maybe its not silver, maybe I just think it is. 

 

10 hours ago, Deang said:

use clips on the leads (heat sink), and then get in and get out.

Good tip.

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Most silver solder for electronics has like 3 or 4% silver in it, along with the tin and lead. It's not difficult to work with, and I use it for the Jupiters, which have silver leads.

 

It almost sounds like you might have gotten a hold of some lead free silver solder, which is used in plumbing on copper.

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