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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Audible Nectar said:

As one who has a fair quantity of vintage heritage I find these new models to look very, very attractive. Love the cursive "Cornwall" on those grills - very cool.

 

Yes, I found the rosewood CWs just irresistible, and I thought about it for like 10 days. Previously I have never spent more than $1k (the RP-280Fs) for a pair of speakers. But my rationale was made in America by Klipsch, simply beautiful cabs instead of "big black boxes", 15" woofers, sweet sweet sound reproduction, super efficient with input power, good price, and one day Heritage production will perhaps stop. In the pics on the Klipsch website the Cornwall script appears to be chromed, but mine are not. Was a wee bit disappointed, but I got over it once I fired them up. The rosewood veneer is better than I expected. Here is another closeup photo of veneer. 

 

DSC_0012small.JPG

 

The Australian Walnut is gorgeous (the best appearing veneer imo) but could only find one pair for sale on ebay and they want $5900 for them delivered, and that isn't happening from me.

Edited by polizzio
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1 hour ago, polizzio said:

If I could screw down that door stop posted above i would. For everyday I feel ok right now, but if somebody was to really push or force the door open, it could hit it. Gonna give it some additional thought; open to ideas.

 

Easy.  Rent a hammer drill (not a rotary hammer, which has a piston driving an internal "hammer" via air spring - a hammer drill is just like a "regular" drill but as you press it causes the chuck, which has serrations, to "interface" with fixed serrations making it go "dzdzdzdz" [high-pitched] as opposed to the rotary hammer's lower-pitched "thwacks") and drill through to the wood below.  If it's on concrete, even better - drill a hole large enough for a fireplace matchstick (or small dowel), stick that in the hole and screw into it.

 

No way I'd trust (or even use) a hinge-pin stop on an exterior door anyway.

 

If you were halfway near I'd install it for you for a couple beers and a couple shots.

 

Congrats!  They're gorgeous.

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Beauties, the reddish wood and the metallic grilles are a sight. I agree completely with you on the SB-3000, you should have no problem moving it.

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53 minutes ago, glens said:

 

Easy.  Rent a hammer drill (not a rotary hammer, which has a piston driving an internal "hammer" via air spring - a hammer drill is just like a "regular" drill but as you press it causes the chuck, which has serrations, to "interface" with fixed serrations making it go "dzdzdzdz" [high-pitched] as opposed to the rotary hammer's lower-pitched "thwacks") and drill through to the wood below.  If it's on concrete, even better - drill a hole large enough for a fireplace matchstick (or small dowel), stick that in the hole and screw into it.

 

No way I'd trust (or even use) a hinge-pin stop on an exterior door anyway.

 

If you were halfway near I'd install it for you for a couple beers and a couple shots.

 

Congrats!  They're gorgeous.

 

You're sure this will work? It would be concrete below the tile (slab house). I have a Home Depot 1.5 miles from me and they have a great tool rental dept. What kind of screw would you suggest to use into the wood dowel? The blue concrete screws?

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10 minutes ago, JohnJ said:

Beauties, the reddish wood and the metallic grilles are a sight. I agree completely with you on the SB-3000, you should have no problem moving it.

 

Thank you sir.

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8 hours ago, polizzio said:

Thank you gentlemen for the warm reception. There is a door stop on the upper hinge which I did re-adjust to prevent contact with the CW (by a couple inches), but it would hit the CW first. I may have to rethink a more rigid solid stop. Def don't want any contact whatsoever. If the SWAT come busting in, it would take a painful hit. I live alone and there are no small children or teens involved at this point. I'm 61.

 

Can't nail a stop into ceramic tile :)  

 

I only had the 280s for a month, and they were very impressive. Along with an SVS sb-3000 for movies, serious low bass authority. Hard to go wrong with the 280s for the price. But I wanted something nicer that "big black boxes" at this point in my life. I like wood so i splurged big time. And acoustic sound design in Vegas had them at a great price. He must have purchased like 15-20 pairs and blew them out. These CWs will be with me til death.........short of another flood.

 

I have a pair of BIC (DV-64 I believe) towers I purchased after my house was flooded in August 2012. Low end but they did the job. Not bad for $280 a pair delivered. Going to sell those, and probably the 45 day old SVS sub too. The SB-3000 is an amazing 1000 watt sealed sub, massive 13" driver.

 

I've had some interesting stereos in my lifetime. When I was 20 I had a pair of Peavey SP-1 loudspeakers (horn tweeter and 15" woofer in a vented cab) and a CS-800 amp in the LR. 400 clean watts per channel, and we used to see the clipping lights blink pretty frequently. Had to use pillows to keep feedback out of my turntable, cds had not been invented yet. 8 track yes, but that's not really hi fidelity. Led Zepplin, Santana, Allman Bros, and Pink Floyd were regulars. Couple hundred vinyl records. Neighbors were not very enthusiastic about my music. I was a young rebellious butthole then.

 

I really like great bass guitar riffs, and solid rythmik kick drum melodies. Fleetwood Mack Tusk is pretty cool with the sub. I run my bass hot. No flat Audyssy here.

Massive DMB fan, and Floyd and Gilmour too. Classical and jazz too. Pretty much anything but rap. Just doesn't work for me. 

Get yourself a ceramic(Not masonary) drill some plumber's putty and drill a hole

 Put a pin in protect those speakers!!

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1 hour ago, glens said:

If you were halfway near I'd install it for you for a couple beers and a couple shots.

 

But only if the beers and shots happened AFTER the install, right? ;)

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And yes after you get thruogh the tile you will need a masonary bit if on a slab. But you just spent ?? Drills are cheap

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Just now, Yuper said:

And yes after you get thruogh the tile you will need a masonary bit if on a slab. But you just spent ?? Drills are cheap

 

Drill bits. I'll rent the hammer drill.

From the above post I could drill the hole and use a slip in metal pin of some sort. Instead of the door stop. To block the travel of the door. Then just lift pin out if needed to move/rotate the speaker, like to access the rear of my receiver/tv/ cables.

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Those stops typically have a machine-threaded hole in their base and a screw with machine threads on one end and wood-screw threads on the other.

 

The two ends have different thread pitches and you adjust the final (tight) orientation of the stop by adjusting the screw in the substrate.

 

I'd have one beer and one shot each end of the task.  Running a cord, drilling, shop-vac-ing, installing - 10 or 15 minutes all-in.

 

The pin you suggested would work but may damage the door and/or pose a nasty safety hazard.  As well might chip the tile if called upon to perform its task of saving the speaker.  You'll not get a perfectly-edged hole in the tile (by the way, don't engage the hammer action until you're about as deep as the width of the bit, and then only use enough pressure as necessary to make reasonable time through the tile; then you can lean into it for the "cement") and the foot of the stop will atone for that (any) sin.

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14 hours ago, polizzio said:

Can't nail a stop into ceramic tile

Not true. You can easily. I do it all the time. Do not rent. Borrow. Standard homeowner cordless drill with a hammer mode for this job. 

 

First to cut though the tile. Use a diamond bit like this one

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rubi-1-4-in-Wet-Cut-Drill-Bit-4920/204074164.

Standard drill function.Let the drill do the work. Do not push. Keep it wet. 


Next follow up with the hammer drill bit into the concrete floor. This is where you use the hammer function. Use a vac to suck up the dust and silica.

 

A real door stop will protect your door and your speakers. I happen to like this one.

https://www.amazon.com/Design-House-204735-Mounted-Nickel/dp/B0083ZLGOS/ref=asc_df_B0083ZLGOS/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167148637601&hvpos=1o36&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7555674049267045856&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9018991&hvtargid=pla-307616126318&psc=1

 

 I typically use Tapcon anchors. Easy to use easy to remove. They even come with the appropriate masonary bit. Too bad Tapcons are blue. Hilti makes similar anchors in a metalic finish.

 

Oh, and one more thing. Really try to keep those original Cornwall III boxes if at all possible.

 

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14 hours ago, polizzio said:

If I could screw down that door stop posted above i would. For everyday I feel ok right now, but if somebody was to really push or force the door open, it could hit it. Gonna give it some additional thought; open to ideas.

Can see the complete door, would it be possible to turn it around so door opens in other direction?

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, 314carpenter said:

Do not rent. Borrow. Standard homeowner cordless drill with a hammer mode for this job.  

 

I don't like to borrow power tools.  If it fails for any reason I'd be buying a new tool and then not owning it.  My rule of thumb is if rental is more than a third the cost of buying, I'll generally buy, unless I expect more than a couple uses.

 

7 hours ago, 314carpenter said:

I typically use Tapcon anchors. Easy to use easy to remove. They even come with the appropriate masonary bit.

 

In my experience (several thousand of them) the failure rate (on the first insertion) is too high to use them for something like the stop you showed in a residence.  A heavy duty stop like that is definitely needed for commercial doors/usage, a bit overkill perhaps for this scenario.  At any rate, tapcons don't do well with re-use of the hole - it's not like cutting threads in wood (better) or steel (best).

 

If there's insufficient room to walk the speaker out around a stop in that location then perhaps installing the stop you specified (with good advice on the drilling) with a masonry nail dropped into a just-oversized hole would be a better solution.  The stop could be picked straight up for removal but would still provide suitability of purpose, though heavy usage as a stop could still fracture the tile.

 

[Edit to add]

Could use a wood screw into an inserted plug instead of that last notion.  Might be the best combination of all aspects involved.

Edited by glens

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43 minutes ago, Ljk said:

Can see the complete door, would it be possible to turn it around so door opens in other direction?

 

Definitely an option, but one which would surely cost more than the purchase of a professional-quality hammer drill alone. 

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… o O (let's take the door out of the frame, and reverse it)

 

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8 hours ago, 314carpenter said:

 

Oh, and one more thing. Really try to keep those original Cornwall III boxes if at all possible.

 

 

The boxes are in my attic already. I don't throw out any box for equipment I own. I still have a Denon AVR-3000 I purchased new in approx 1991 sitting in its original box/packing in a closet. The packing/foam inserts for the CW iii are impressive in itself. Klipsch has it going on. You build fine Heritage loudspeakers, you pack them like fine china. They traveled from Hope AR to Vegas, then back to me in south Louisiana.

 

It amazes me why people don't keep boxes/packing. I was looking at a used Yamaha AVR on ebay very recently, 4 months old and the guy doesn't have original box. That's just not smart imo.....what if you have to send it in for warranty repair?

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Ljk said:

Can see the complete door, would it be possible to turn it around so door opens in other direction?

 

That isn't happening. Would require new LH opening door assembly, install, and painting. Have two ideas, the door stop install suggested earlier, or a 2x4 cut 5" long to lay in front of the CW riser (touching riser at rest) and block any direct contact with the door. I could easily spray it flat black to blend in. Heck I could even glue felt or rubber on both contact ends (bumpers). I just checked for a measurement and the door handle would hit the cabinet edge/veneer if driven there today. That speaker has to either rotate or be pulled out when I need access to my AVR and/or TV rear connections/cabling. I purchased a set of nail in furniture slides at walmart to install but haven't done that yet as I need some help flipping the CWs to remove the existing metal "buttons" and install the slides. That will make it very easy for me to rotate/move that left speaker for access. And prevent damaging my tile flooring. The "blocker" is an easy and simple remedy.

 

If i install the previously mentioned doorstop, it will most likely impede my rotation/moving speaker for AVR cable access. Banana plugs make speaker movement a snap when needed. But I am listening to you guys, still pondering the possibilities. 

 

My power went out this morning @ 0554 for 3.25 hours. Severe weather. Just got 2 tornado warnings on cell. It be very dark outside. Going comfort my CWiii. 

Edited by polizzio
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22 minutes ago, polizzio said:

I purchased a set of nail in furniture slides at walmart to install but haven't done that yet as I need some help flipping the CWs to remove the existing metal "buttons" and install the slides. 

 

I wouldn't do that.  Home Depot, et al, have furniture sliders, plastic on the bottom with foam on the top.  I've got some that are barely larger than a silver dollar and recommend that's what you use without flipping the speakers or pulling the buttons.

 

The unfastened block is a good idea.  You might consider getting a paving brick, a small entry rug to cut up, and a small container of adhesive to glue the rug pieces cut to fit to the brick.  It would be less likely to slide around than a piece of wood, would absorb impacts better before moving not as far, and wrapped, would not mar any surfaces.

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5 minutes ago, glens said:

 

I wouldn't do that.  Home Depot, et al, have furniture sliders, plastic on the bottom with foam on the top.  I've got some that are barely larger than a silver dollar and recommend that's what you use without flipping the speakers or pulling the buttons.

 

 

I saw those in a pic somewhere here on the forum. It would make life easier, no flipping. Moving a heavy speaker is pretty easy with those? Doesn't try to slip off the riser button when moving? I'll only be moving/sliding that one 2 or 3 feet.

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Doesn't try to slip off.  Just tip the speaker a little and stick the two under those corners, repeat (it's a tad more difficult for the second two because the speaker will want to slide - might have to back it up with your foot).

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