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BigStewMan

Anyone use a dehumidifier?

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My two cents is, get a large one.  When we were building, we had such humidity that prior to the drywall going up, you'd have ambient moisture condensing on the copper pipes in the ceiling.....drip....and you could see puddles (lines) all across the room where it was literally raining from above.

 

I bought (I think) a 40 pint (24 hour if I recall) unit....and the next MORNING you could feel a complete change of atmosphere.

 

The higher capacity units....how to describe....  take a soaked towel, wring it.  You will initially get a lot of water out of it.  To get that last bit of moisture from it, you have to wring it tighter & tighter....  the higher capacity units are sort of like wringing the soaked towel and will squeeze more moisture out faster than the smaller units.

 

I'd personally rather have a unit that will yank the moisture out say, over night than having to take 2 days of continuous use to achieve same.

 

If you can drain it automatically (pop plug in canister and attach hose to sink) then it can run as often as it needs.

 

Just remember that bigger is betterer (my opinion)

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Where was what?  Where it was raining?  Right here in East TN.  I've never seen that happen (if that's what you refer to) but it's a walk out basement, we had tons of rain so it was very humid and since basement was 1/2 under ground I guess that made it worse.

 

It really was interesting....except for it being my home that was drowning!!!

 

First morning after putting the dehumidifyer in, all water was gone but the AIR was much much dryer.  Wasn't cold & clammy...was very comfortable.

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15 hours ago, BigStewMan said:

Thanks Pete ... one more question, in this small of an apartment, what size unit would you think appropriate to do the job?

 

I would agree with Richard that going with a larger unit like a 70 pint would be the way to go, but in a 1000 sq.' you could scale that down a bit if you wanted to.  

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I use a 70 pint stand alone in the basement here in relatively humid KC. Set it around 45% and must empty the container daily. This is of course during the humid summer months. This is a full basement under a ranch and where the “cave” is constructed relative to the nearest drain requires using the container not a hose to drain. PITA but it is what it is 

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@BigStewMan We've used one here for about three years now. Used DampRid since FL but the formula changed and it wasn't very good after that. Plus our monsoon-like weather here that I've mentioned before.

The one we had took a dump last month, literally water on the floor. To the curb without hesitation.

 

Got a rubber mat to place under the new one, an LG 70 pint/24hrs that is marked way down now because they're only making 50 pint ones now. It's not really high db noisy but it could be an aggravating sound. Have to set this one to run for a certain number of hours for it to turn completely off when it reaches the set %. It works well, especially since I've put it near the air return.

 

Not really cheap but it works so much quicker & better than using the ac. If this one lasts two or three years it would be cheaper than $15 monthly for those crystals monthly and works better. The electricity probably makes it more.

 

My congestion is improved greatly when the humidity is lower than 50%. Since I have acquired an aversion to taking pills, I prefer this route.

 

https://www.abt.com/product/111143/LG-Black-PuriCare-Dehumidifier-UD701KOG3.html

 

It is not matte finished like the image, it is high gloss like the piano here.

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I run a 70 pint 24/7 and can empty it more than once a day, that is why I mentioned a gravity feed to a floor drain or a pump type. In Kentucky, a daily average in the summer is close to 80%. I keep ceiling fans going 24/7 in my machine shops and in my house. Keeping air moving is more important than it seems, but here it makes a large difference.

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23 hours ago, Woofers and Tweeters said:

I run a 70 pint 24/7 and can empty it more than once a day, that is why I mentioned a gravity feed to a floor drain or a pump type. In Kentucky, a daily average in the summer is close to 80%. I keep ceiling fans going 24/7 in my machine shops and in my house. Keeping air moving is more important than it seems, but here it makes a large difference.

I had the same thing where my humidity in my house was like 70% in Mississippi. Would have to empty the dehumidifier every day. Decided to ask one of our HVAC techs at work what could be causing it.  He came and checked. My AC unit was oversized and what he called "short runs" was causing the issue.  My old one was near end of life so I went 1/2 ton smaller.  Bam humidity stays around 55% which is amazing in Mississippi during the summer.

 

 

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On 2/21/2020 at 2:28 PM, grasshopper said:

 

Never really noticed the humidity on Kauai. It is cooler than Honolulu. Nevermind that hard candy melted out of its wrapper, cigs didn't get stale and raisins were always soft. Our condo was on the north side of the building. It was cool and air always moving.

you must of been on the dry side , kauai gets more rain than any where else on the planet , still has a dry side .

I'd move back to dry climate 

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On 2/22/2020 at 12:28 PM, Woofers and Tweeters said:

I run a 70 pint 24/7 and can empty it more than once a day, that is why I mentioned a gravity feed to a floor drain or a pump type. In Kentucky, a daily average in the summer is close to 80%. I keep ceiling fans going 24/7 in my machine shops and in my house. Keeping air moving is more important than it seems, but here it makes a large difference.

Agreed 100% if "they" can talk about heat index and chill factor then the light breeze on us humans can make a big difference. Had to get a few when living in central FL for that decade, now 600 miles north I can't live without them. One in each room except the bathrooms have fart-fans that can suck a breeze out of the vent without the air handler even running.

 

The whole house exhaust fans are in a lot of the homes around here built around 1960, pop the windows open a bit and running those I think are even better than a ceiling fan at times!

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Keep in mind that once any air is inhaled it quickly gets heated and fully 100% humidified at body temp. Keep in mind that ambient humidity content varies greatly with temperature. 100% humidity at 15F is much, much lower at 72F. So in cold temps the body has a humidity deficit........ it adds moisture to inhaled air to bring it up to 100% humidity at body temp.

 

Relative humidity is usually a comfort issue but high humidity in high temps leads to environmental issues that can trigger reactive airways (asthma). High humidity results in growth of molds which can saturate air with spores, some can be toxic. Mites grow better in warm high humidity areas. Warm highly humid air is heavier and can be perceived as increasing work of breathing. Warm air with high humidity holds particulate aerosols better. On the other hand dry cold air can cold stress airways. Running on a cold dry day often leads to sore airways and can produce asthmatic responses. This is why folks wear snoods in winter. A snood captures exhaled warmth and humidity and thus transfers those to the next inhaled breath reducing cold stress.

 

Getting environmental humidifier systems in cold climates often means adding humidity to keep levels at around 40% relative humidity at room temps.  So...... if you are having breathing issues it may be related to other environmental issues. You can have the house evaluated for mold pollutants. Keeping fresh air cycling through a home reduces stagnation issues. 
 

The answer to your needs can be complex. You can buy home environmental management systems that’ll keep the house totally ‘clean’, no dust, no bugs and proper humidity. I’d suggest you 1st examine areas you can’t visualize for mold. It can get into everything. Look under couch cushions, laundry chutes, crawl spaces and those trackways shower doors glide on are always moldy. Replace your pillows. Wash your bedding and towels more frequently. Make sure your forced air system is cycling outside air into your home and keep its filters clean. Air ducts......... can be huge problems.

 

Lastly if you have any level of asthma make sure you have a rescue inhaler handy. If severe....... keep an epi-pen on hand.

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I have the opposite problem here in the cold part of NA. For about 4-5 months of the year I have to run a Humidifier. With out it my 900 sq. ft. apartment gets down to 30% (and less)

in the cold months cause the heat is constantly on to some degree. I usually add about 1-2 gallons of water to it daily to keep my humidity at 40-45%.

Anything more or less is uncomfortable.

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