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Home Theater

Talk about Klipsch Home Theater products and setups including Floorstanders, Bookshelf Speakers, Soundbars and more here!

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  1. Freeze after Firmware Update Failure

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  2. Advice

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  3. RP-8000F vs. RF-7III 1 2

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  • Recent Posts

    • Here's what bob says about break in n capacitors... & drivers.  I think what he says about "brightness" spot on.    Q:  Do components have a break-in time? A:  Some do and some don't.  Capacitors would be a definite NO.  Let's look at this one a bit.   You have new good quality capacitors installed in your crossovers.  Capacitors have exactly two qualities that effect the sound of your music that goes through them.  Those are capacitance (what we use them for) and ESR.  ESR is the sum of all other qualities of a capacitor other than capacitance expressed as an Equivalent Series Resistance.  ESR is a bad thing.  Good caps have ESR so low it is barely measurable, on the order of  a couple of hundredths of an ohm.  ESR is made up of stuff like the resistance of the leads and their connections to the foil inside the capacitor or stray inductance or dielectric absorption. So, we put our new caps in the crossovers.  These new caps are right on the capacitance value the design calls for and the ESR is almost unmeasurably low.  What exactly of these two qualities do you expect to change with break-in?  And if either of them changed, why would you expect the sound to get better since the only way they could change is to go away from the "perfect" values they had to start with?  I hope any caps you use in your crossovers are good enough that they do not change at all for many years of use.   Q:  But my speakers sound so bright after putting in the new caps that I have to hope they change with break-in.  In fact I am pretty sure they are getting better as I listen longer.  They must be changing. A:  Sounding brighter is a good thing.  That means your old caps were really bad and had high ESR.  That high ESR had the impedance all upset on the crossovers and you had the drivers all trying to play at the wrong frequencies.  Also, the high ESR was directly attenuating the high frequencies.  Now with the new good caps, the frequency and level relationships are back to where the factory had them when the speakers were new.  The fact that you think they are changing now is because you are getting used to them sounding like they should.  The break in is occurring but it is inside your head instead of inside the speakers.   Q:  How about break in time for wires and interconnect cables? A:  None   Q:  How about break in time for drivers or new driver diaphragms? A:  Yes, and depends on the size of the driver.  Tweeter diaphragm probably break-in at a matter of seconds.  They are very low mass and move very little, so any break in would happen almost instantly.  Probably happened when the factory tested the diaphragm after manufacture. Midrange are a bit bigger and have a bit more mass.  Break-in is probably on the order of minutes with these. Woofers would take the longest.  I think that break-in on a 12 to 15 inch woofer would be less than an hour played at pretty good volume using music with a lot of low frequency content.    
    • As long as the repair is along the seam and not on the surround shoe goo is an acceptable long lasting repair.   If the rubber surround has hardened and no longer flexible it will need to be replaced with a new one.
    • In the umpteen years I've been on here I've only had one bad transaction and he no longer posts here.  I'm fairly certain it was a flipper.  Other than that one time, transactions have been stellar.
    • I have the RP280f's.....the previous iteration of your 8000's.  I use them in two channel for music only using a Yamaha A-S500 integrated amp.  Plenty of low end, no sub necessary, and to me, this combination works very well together.  Someone up thread suggested the A-S701 - and I would heartily concur.  It also falls right in your price range.  As they say, your mileage may vary.  Enjoy those new speakers!
    • Well, Flyboy (you started it! ), sounds like you've got a nice system put together!!   Better stop now while you're young & innocent....  it only draws you in more and you want to get better sound (which is always possible) and before you know it, you'll have a 7.1 surround system comprised of MWM Grande stacks....with a couple dinky subwoofers thrown in for good measure.   Flee while you can.
    • These are brand new horns and there are not warehouses full of them. What craze are you referring to?
    • Jason ---what are you repairing with the shoe goo--------will it glue on , seal on-------------and wouldn't glue be just as good  -
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