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Book recommendation?

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Hey guys,  I was hoping you guys had a few recommendations on books to learn basic circuitry?  I would really like something that can help read/build circuit diagrams for valve amplifiers. Hopefully for a beginner and relatively easy to digest.  I currently have a bit of time in quarantine, and would like to spend some more time reading.  My immediate goal is to build a few circuits I've seen floating around on here, help is appreciated!

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I started out by reading books written by Alfred P Morgan (1889-1972). The Boy's First (second, third, etc) Book of Radio And Electronics, and others he wrote in the first half of the last century. It got me interested in soldering things together back when I was 7, still doing it 50 some years later.

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12 hours ago, -Russian-Spy- said:

Hey guys,  I was hoping you guys had a few recommendations on books to learn basic circuitry?  I would really like something that can help read/build circuit diagrams for valve amplifiers. Hopefully for a beginner and relatively easy to digest.  I currently have a bit of time in quarantine, and would like to spend some more time reading.  My immediate goal is to build a few circuits I've seen floating around on here, help is appreciated!

@Chris A and @Mallette both teach, I don't think on that particular subject, but I would expect they have both come across books on that subject that they thought were well written and they have always been a great source of books on many, many topics so maybe they will have something.

 

@Wardsweb may have some go to reference books on his bench that he likes.

 

@Deang and @Marvel

 

I know Marty has at least one in mind @thebes

 

Maynard you have to figure must have one he like @tube fanatic

 

I hope you get the answer you are looking for.

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Go on americanradiohistory.com, bring up Popular Electronics magazine, and start reading with the first issue.  You will learn all about circuits, how they work, how to lay out projects, read schematics, and more.  After you have mastered the basics get a copy of Practical Radio Servicing by Marcus and Levy, and read the chapters on power supplies and audio stages to learn how they work.  I used the latter extensively to teach newbies about audio amp building back in the day.
 

Maynard

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23 hours ago, -Russian-Spy- said:

Hey guys,  I was hoping you guys had a few recommendations on books to learn basic circuitry?  I would really like something that can help read/build circuit diagrams for valve amplifiers. Hopefully for a beginner and relatively easy to digest.  I currently have a bit of time in quarantine, and would like to spend some more time reading.  My immediate goal is to build a few circuits I've seen floating around on here, help is appreciated!

 

I'd recommend Doug Self's "Audio Power Amplifier Design Handbook"

 

Not to dissuade you, but note that you probably need to get for yourself a project to get going, like Nelson Pass's Amp Camp amplifiers (solid state).  This isn't really a beginner's subject as there are a handful of basic ideas that you have to digest (definition of an amplifier, the different types of devices [BJT, FETs, triode/pentode, etc.] and classes of amplification [A, AB, D, etc.]).  That just barely scratches the surface of the domain, and many more basic ideas concerning circuit design based on device types is necessary in order to get a working knowledge of the subject. 

 

Actually, the subject is a little steep in terms of initial learning curve.  It would be similar to a person off the street with no technical background suddenly trying to use finite element analysis (FEA) or even boundary element analysis (BEA) to understand how to design mechanical components.  There are lots of electrical engineers walking around that aren't really knowledgeable on hi-fi audio amplifier designs even though they spent four+ years getting a university degree using amplifiers on chips, etc.  So consider hi-fi audio amplifier design to be a pretty narrow specialization within the field of electrical engineering. 

 

If you're talking about technically obsolete devices--tubes...that specialization gets much narrower.  No one outside of the hi-fi audio and perhaps some very esoteric environments (withstanding nuclear electromagnetic pulse, extremely high power broadcasting amplifiers) really use tubes.  They were basically supplanted by solid state devices for all other applications other than home hi-fi over 50 years ago, and even within home hi-fi, their use is considered "old school obsolete".  You wouldn't be using them if you worked for any of the major corporations that produce consumer hi-fi electronics. 

 

Chris

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I have these but can't claim I've read them recently:

 

A Taste of Tubes, The Connoisseur's Cookbook, by Sonic Frontiers

 

Audio Servicing Theory and Practice, by Andy J. Wells

 

Practical Radio Servicing, Vol. 2 by William Marcus and Alex Levy

 

Radio Troubleshooting Handbook by Alfred Al Ghirardi

 

A series of handbooks used for lessons put out by the National Radio Institute. They cover both radio and television and there are about 30 plus in all.

 

I mostly use these books to put out electrical fires I start (slap, slap) due to my not using them as intended.

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Youtube is you friend in the 21st century. From beginner to engineer.  Uncle Doug is not a bad place to start for tube circuits. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuR4hQTXkG_KxozLxwPzEjQ

 

There are many like him also on youtube but he is a teacher by trade and does a good job for a beginner to learn from. At least from memory says he is, was a teacher. It is always good to have a teacher than just reading a book not that there is much to learn from reading a book as well. 

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On 4/18/2020 at 10:32 AM, -Russian-Spy- said:

Hey guys,  I was hoping you guys had a few recommendations on books to learn basic circuitry?  I would really like something that can help read/build circuit diagrams for valve amplifiers. Hopefully for a beginner and relatively easy to digest.  I currently have a bit of time in quarantine, and would like to spend some more time reading.  My immediate goal is to build a few circuits I've seen floating around on here, help is appreciated!

 

Here are my suggestions, in order of easy to digest:

 

Tube Audio:

Beginner's Guide to Tube Audio Design, Bruce Rozenblit

Principles of Power (A Practical Guide to Tube Power Amplifier Design), Kevin O'Connor

Valve Amplifiers, Morgan Jones

The Tube Preamp Cookbook, Allen Wright

Radiotron Designer's Handbook, F. Langford-Smith

 

Basic Electronics:

Beginners Guide to Electronics, Martin Pickering

 

Also:

Glass Audio reprinted numerous articles (Audio Classroom series) by Norman Crowhurst on tube audio design which may still be found online

Back Issues of Vacuum Tube Valley (out of print) which can found as pdfs online, I think

Back Issues of Sound Practices (out of print), don't know if these are available online

 

 

 

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I like the tube books by rca, sylvania, and anything I can find. The radiotrons are also great. Then I like just reading any of the old hi-fi diy electronics magazines. It is good fun.

Sound Practices and Vaccum Tube Valley are superb.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This course was recommended online from a highly rated X-ray repair company owner as a refresher course for technicians and also for beginners wanting to learn electronics. On sale now cheap, regular price about $100. Just what is needed for house bond wanting to get into electronics individuals on this forum. I forgot all about this course when this thread was started.  Always nice to have a teacher along with books. 

 

https://www.udemy.com/course/crash-course-electronics-and-pcb-design/

 

Just thought I would add I have bought the course myself for a refresher course and to learn more about circuits. It has been 50 years since I took a course and much has been forgotten. It is also something for geeks and others that consider this more interesting than main stream entertainment run down our throats in movies and tv. 

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I am really enjoying the udemy course I bought. I look at one each morning while drinking coffee. Anyone wishing to learn electronics or want a refresher course will like this very much. He starts out with just the basics with each component for those that know nothing or very little about the subject. But it gets as complicated as one wants with more lessons. Stop when you want or take it all the way. Well worth the price. 

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I failed to mention that a 919 page book is included with the course. Udemy, Crash Course Electronics by Andre LaMothe. Starts off with just the basics, components. Best I can tell not the same as this book but I am guessing much the same https://www.amazon.com/dp/0672328208/?coliid=I1VM71PMBDPMG8&colid=QDBNPJWUJH24&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it.

 

I took this as a refresher course but have learned a lot already that I did not know and I am just getting started on the course. How much I will retain at my age is yet to be determined. Retail the course is $100 but put one sale frequently for $15 or $16 or maybe even less. The book is worth the price of the course since this topic is books about electronics. 

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On 4/18/2020 at 7:11 PM, Davecv41 said:

I started out by reading books written by Alfred P Morgan (1889-1972). The Boy's First (second, third, etc) Book of Radio And Electronics, and others he wrote in the first half of the last century. It got me interested in soldering things together back when I was 7, still doing it 50 some years later.

 

Great books! 

I like the writing style, it's very easy to understand.

In fact they're not so many books on electronics, especially 

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