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The next generation could not care less about our hobby.


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My father had a Grundig console stereo when I was growing up. Touching it was forbidden. I couldn't tell you what kind of amp was in it though I do remember hearing about it having a Garrard record changer in it. I got a Panasonic all-in-one stereo when I was 13 that had a record changer and cassette player/recorder.

When I went away to school 'everyone' had a stereo that consisted of a reciever, turntable and speakers and maybe a cassette or open reel deck...though some still had 8-tracks.

I think Walkman's and ghetto blisters, or boom boxes, were the beginning of the demise of HiFi audio.

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hmmm... I had one of the first boom boxes any of my friends had ever seen. It was my first stereo purchase and the beginning of my journey. Unless you count the pocket AM transistor radio and later a clock radio. Whoops I forgot the parent's Magnavox console... spent hours with that too.

I wonder about the music and the fragile storage mediums we use.

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There will shortly be an infrastructure shift that will allow for lossless audio streaming over portable devices. Earbuds are starting to sound really good and in some ways better than a lot of the great stereos I've heard over the years

I wish the industry had gone through this shift about 15 years ago. I wonder if there had been the will, would there have been the way?

The introduction of inferior formats, like MP3, was a huge mistake. At least, when I bought my moderate quality Klipsch Pro Media in about 2005, there was a warning in the manual that using MP3 as a source might result in lower quality!

Practically all of the live music young people are exposed to is amplified music. If more of them heard unamplified live music, there might be more appreciation for the way orchestral music, jazz, etc. really sound. I wonder if kids who play in the school orchestra are more oriented toward good sound reproduction than the general youth population.

At least modern kids can hear fairly good sound in some movie theaters and some home theaters.

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I disagree with generalizing all kids of this generation. There are many thrift stores and antique stores around central Arkansas that are carrying more vintage consoles, turntables and hifi gear because kids are into it. I used to get pretty good deals but because it is "cool" the prices have started going up. This started with the vinyl revolution that is going on but they all want something cool to play their records on and not that POS at Target.

I agree. I live in central Arkansas too. Last time I was in Hastings there were college kids male and female looking through all the vinly new and used for sale. They were buying too. Both my sons (25 and 19 almost 20) are buying new vinly records and building their collections although neither has a turntable yet. Neither do I but I'm looking. BTW, vinly sales were up 37% nationally in 2013.

Yup while CD sales are dropping like a rock and has for sometime Vinyl keeps rising...

Although vinyl record sales are up 40%, about 12 million units last year, vinyl sales are less than 2% of total music sales. Non-CD digital music leads the way with sales in billions. The next generation has spoken. :rolleyes:

You are misinterpreting the numbers...compare the percentages to 10 years ago and the trend is clear..vinyl will never die...

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Also to honestly interpret the numbers used vinyl sales would have to be included..

Then used CD sales would need to be included also. There are over 10 billion CDs produced annually with greater numbers produced in prior years, so used CD sales are sure to dwarf used vinyl sales.

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I wonder if kids who play in the school orchestra are more oriented toward good sound reproduction than the general youth population.

As an acoustic guitar player, and hi-fi buff, we always had music in the house. My daughter played piano, my older son bought an acoustic guitar and electric bass.

For some reason, the younger son told us one day that he wanted to learn to play trumpet. We obliged, and though we always had symphonic/classical music in the house, we started going to the local symphony more and more. We homeschooled, so our son got into a homeschool band, but also tried out for and got into the city's youth orchestra. He played First the last two years, before going off to college, where he majored in Music Composition.

The main point here is that, in our home, we made a conscientious choice to listen to music and listen to all kinds of music and go to live concerts, both the symphony to blues, rock, bluegrass and jazz. For us it was just like reading... If your kids see you are interested, they are more likely to get involved as well.

Bruce

Edited by Marvel
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Music is a requirement in my house... as is athletics and of course their school studies. We don't tell them what they have to do... just that they can choose something musical... learn an instrument, sing, whatever and choose something athletic to pursue. I'm surprised they don't complain more about that but they find plenty of other things. We attend about half a dozen performances a year and take the kids to as many as possible.

They love to play their instruments and sing but they don't yet seem to listen nearly as much as I did. Their school has quite a music program and my oldest two are actually invited as part of their vocal ensemble to perform at Carnegie Hall next year along with 200 other high school kids. I'm pretty excited for them and I suspect some of you might be too when I decide what to put up for sale to pay their way.

Still, when they listen to music it is mostly through ear buds on their phones. Oh, and by the way, they TALK on their cell phone less than 1% of the time. It is always text or sometimes email.

Now regarding the equipment we use to try to reproduce musical performances... I wouldn't have known or thought anything about Hi Fi if not for the local Hi Fi shop and their patient and at least somewhat knowledgeable help. Around here they closed 25 years ago and now there is nothing but Best Buy or the like where there is basically no knowledge. I think places like this forum has the potential to bridge that gap a little bit.

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"Everyone with a smattering of hi-fi experience understands that there has been precious little improvement in the final sound (at the ear) from say, 1955 to today."

While for the most part I agree with this I have to ask when did this revelation sneak into your consciousness? Seems like a total contradiction to most of the last ten years of your public comments and as recent as the last couple months....

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How many different ways has Disney released "Snow White?"

I believe Snow White was (widely) released in 4 different ways: Film, VHS, DVD, Blu-ray.

But, Ben-Hur was released in 6 different ways: 70 mm prints, 35 mm prints, VHS, DVD #1, DVD #2 ("from the original 65mm negative"), Blu-ray.

I'm not sure, but Citizen Kane may have come out 4 ways.

None of the above includes inexpensive v.s. deluxe packaging, # of special features, etc.

It's possible that quality music reproduction today is worse than in 1955, given that as some of the equipment got better, some got worse (Tubes v.s. SS), and many of the sources are now worse than vinyl (when everything just happened to go right) or real time transferred reel to reel tape @ 7.5 or 15. I will say that, with modern movies, Blu-ray sound and images in a good HT are superb, compared to movie quality we used to get in the home, but not enough TLC is expended in transferring old classics, like those mentioned above.

I've found that my daughter and her friends do appreciate our good HT set-up, and bring their movies over to experience them in our HT.

A few films wil be re-purchased in 4K, when available, or the streaming equivalent? Get out your wallets -- oh, I forgot, it's all PayPal now.

Edited by Garyrc
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"Everyone with a smattering of hi-fi experience understands that there has been precious little improvement in the final sound (at the ear) from say, 1955 to today."

While for the most part I agree with this I have to ask when did this revelation sneak into your consciousness? Seems like a total contradiction to most of the last ten years of your public comments and as recent as the last couple months....

Hmm..... Someone must be paying attention. Curious as to how one retaliates from such an observation?

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