Jump to content
The Klipsch Audio Community
Coytee

Hey "paint" guys.... gotta question for ya!

Recommended Posts

I have an industrial backhoe (JCB).  It's painted that proverbial "industrial yellow" and of course, is greatly faded from new.

 

I don't really care so much about the shade.....as much as "what would be the best (durable) type of paint to put onto something like this?

 

Scenario:  One of my stabilizers has popped a leak so needs to be rebuilt.  When I was inspecting it (as I was attaching new hoses to it) I noticed that the underside is nearly naked of paint so thought I'd pull it off, clean it, rebuild it and then repaint it.

 

I'm guessing that an oil base would be the most durable (?) and same with a primer (?)  Any brand specific that should be considerred first?  When I painted the fenders of my tractor, I was told to go to PPG and use their stuff.  I can do that again if their brand would work well.

 

One reason I bother to ask about this is decades ago, I had my car painted.  At the time, I was a teenager.  Took it to the car wash (mistake #1) and used their pressure washer (mistake #2) and had a spot on the side of the car where the paint literally peeled off when the pressure hit it.  So it wasn't sticking very well and this will get abused so want something sticky!!! (but not to the touch!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a picture so you can see why I'm not terribly concerned about the paint however, if I'm doing the job, would like to do a decent job.  (what better to use for improving my painting skills!!)

JCB.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's my personal Rorschach test... just pick a spot and stare at it for 30 minutes.  Some people tell me they can see Elvis....

 

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Industrial enamel.  Pick a color that you can easily pick up in a spray can for touch ups.  Hit the rust with 36 grit and a DA. Def. prime the ugly spots

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

May I ask what "DA" is??  Don't forget you're talking to a dummy here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For anyone who wants a chuckle....  couple years ago, I had "Frozen Shoulder".  Well, in addition to that, I had a "SLAP" tear and a torn rotator cuff....  all on the same shoulder.

 

Then my swing cylinders decided their life was up and time for them to explode on me.  I needed to get them off however, they are heavy as lead AND you have to hold them both up in midair while taking off the plate that holds them up (then duck lest they fall and crush you)

 

Then, you have to put them up in reverse.....holding TWO 80/90 pound (?  guess) cylinders while also using your mythic third & fourth hands to lift the 50 pound plate that goes under them to hold them.

 

THEN, try that with one arm tied behind your back.

 

That is what I was up against here so I got my floor jack and a plethora of straps.  At the time of the picture, I don't recall if it was going up or coming down but got it done.  Oh, and the bolts have to be torqued to something like 400 Ft Pounds (from memory, not sure if that's correct)

 

So I also had to get a torque multiplier to aid with that.

 

It was a challenge but I'm nothing if not persistent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you should paint it in Black bed liner.  👍  perhaps, time to take it up a notch.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With rust already eating away at parts of it, why not just get everything prepped by scraping loose the flakes where it is peeling, then sanding it spo that the new primier will stick well...and instead of using regular primer, get some of that stuff (can't remember what it is called!) that bonds with the rust...put on a coat of that, then shoot it whatever color you want afterwards?  That way you would be killing two birds with one stone, I would think.

 

Bed liner isn't a bad idea, either....that way when you're climbing around on it, at least your shoes would have a better grip to what they come in contact with! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like the rust is very established. Sand blasting would be the preferred method if you really want to do a pro job, most likely you that's not what you had in mind.

 

The inexpensive alternative is to treat it with a "rust converter" after using a heavy duty wire brush attached to an angle grinder to remove much of the flakey surface rust and old paint. There are many different brands of the stuff for sale that are all basically the same. Here's an example: https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-rust-converter.html

https://www.eastwood.com/4-5-in-angle-grinder.html

https://www.amazon.com/Makita-Piece-Grinders-Heavy-Duty-Conditioning/dp/B01869GKBY

 

After that a good sanding with an orbital sander like a DA (dual action) using progressively finer grits of sandpaper. Start with 60 grit and work up to 300 or so...

 

I'd then use a brush to apply a couple of coats of enamel paint. A brush or roller is the way to go with tractors and farm implements when the surface is rough and you aren't interested in a "show car" quality paint job. Rustoleum makes a farm equipment enamel (and a primer too) that's available at most any Home Depot. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Specialty-1-qt-Farm-Equipment-John-Deere-Yellow-Gloss-Enamel-Paint-2-Pack-7443502/202552473?MERCH=REC-_-PLP_Browse-_-NA-_-202552473-_-N

 

In the past one could purchase original decals for John Deere, Ford, International Harvester and other manufactures. A good finishing touch!

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could also consider DTM (direct to metal coatings).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, thebes said:

You could also consider DTM (direct to metal coatings).

Looks like good stuff! It has been "received with excitement by those industries that specialize in painting dumpsters and storage containers". https://fmipaint.com/direct-to-metal-coatings/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sure you scrape then wire brush then ospho the rust first! Sikkens is fantastic, mostly two part stuff (aliphatic epoxy) at $150 a quart on the late 90s. You have a commercial paint store in town near you? The one here was useless compared to the one in Orlando years ago. A good one would help you out!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Coytee said:

I have an industrial backhoe (JCB).  It's painted that proverbial "industrial yellow" and of course, is greatly faded from new.

 

I don't really care so much about the shade.....as much as "what would be the best (durable) type of paint to put onto something like this?

 

Scenario:  One of my stabilizers has popped a leak so needs to be rebuilt.  When I was inspecting it (as I was attaching new hoses to it) I noticed that the underside is nearly naked of paint so thought I'd pull it off, clean it, rebuild it and then repaint it.

 

I'm guessing that an oil base would be the most durable (?) and same with a primer (?)  Any brand specific that should be considerred first?  When I painted the fenders of my tractor, I was told to go to PPG and use their stuff.  I can do that again if their brand would work well.

 

One reason I bother to ask about this is decades ago, I had my car painted.  At the time, I was a teenager.  Took it to the car wash (mistake #1) and used their pressure washer (mistake #2) and had a spot on the side of the car where the paint literally peeled off when the pressure hit it.  So it wasn't sticking very well and this will get abused so want something sticky!!! (but not to the touch!)

it called preping before painting..

Remove the rust.... remove oil and grease.. epoxy primer..  sand or scuff.. then tack rag ..oil and graese remove... then paint

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Note that I'm not going to paint the machine....  I'm only going to be working on the rear stabilizers

.

14 hours ago, HDBRbuilder said:

Bed liner isn't a bad idea, either....that way when you're climbing around on it, at least your shoes would have a better grip to what they come in contact with! 

 

Andy, you don't know how much you hit this on the head....  I do climb over it like a monkey when I'm trying to reach or fix something (or need a perch while doing something else)

 

I still have some of that red paint I used on the K510 (for the sake of keeping it low cost)...  hadn't thought about that.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just throw the red paint all over it and make a huge mess. Then sell it for art and make about 20 million.

JJK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Da dual action sander. For long flat surfaces you could also use an idiot stick. No I'm not making that up lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cylinders are ....I don't know....  six maybe eight inches in diameter (never really looked at them)

 

but being round, might  be annoying.

 

Isn't there a paint "POR" which is something like paint on rust??

 

I was once told that's the cats meow for oxidized items.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...