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Tarheel

Cables, Coffee, Cycles, and Cocktails

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20 minutes ago, dtel said:

Home again, floor look good. This is pictures of it wet, it is not gloss but satin when it dries. 

 

100 year old oak, the first time it has been sealed.

WOW ---looks brand new

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12 hours ago, sunburnwilly said:

D2A34A7D-6CCA-4B8F-999F-B6A9109C5B35.jpe

 

Not so, if the coffee was from MacDonald's take-out...

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dtel, Love the Craftsman style homes!

Looking good Mr. Kotter!

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I see a spec of dust in the finish.

 

What product did you apply Elden?

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Those pics tell the story.  When you're all done in there it's going to be a showplace!  Kudo's to you all.  

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5 hours ago, CECAA850 said:

I see a spec of dust in the finish.

 

What product did you apply Elden?

Just love it when we talk product.  Moose or gel both work fine as does some of the better hair sprays.

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8 hours ago, CECAA850 said:

I see a spec of dust in the finish.

 

What product did you apply Elden?

there's one in every crowd.

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6 minutes ago, babadono said:

there's one in every crowd.

Depends on the crowd.  But there is always at least one speck of dust.

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12 hours ago, CECAA850 said:

I see a spec of dust in the finish.

 

What product did you apply Elden?

Probably more than one spec, it was swept, swiffered, vacuumed and we picked up pieces as we seen them, but yes I am sure we missed some.

 

Minwax Polyurethane satin. About 3.5-4 gallons for the first coat. It never dried In time for the second coat so Craig and Jim went back Sunday morning to put the second coat, and we left to come home. I would think it took a good bit less for the second coat. 

 

We used a watering can like you would water plants with to put down a little line and spread it with a tool that is made for that, it's like a t bar and you slide a foam piece on it, it did all the floors without falling apart. It's like a tough foam connected to a PVC pipe that slides over the bar, it works perfect, just what we needed and easy it is 18" wide.  

Padco-Lightweight-Floor-Coater-19525-PR-LG.jpg

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43 minutes ago, oldtimer said:
50 minutes ago, babadono said:

there's one in every crowd.

Depends on the crowd.  But there is always at least one speck of dust.

And possibly one in this crowd that wears Depends ?

 

3 hours ago, Tarheel said:

Just love it when we talk product.  Moose or gel both work fine as does some of the better hair sprays.

Moose or gel does not have anything on poly, but you better fix it like you like, it's going to last a long time.

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13 hours ago, KROCK said:

dtel, Love the Craftsman style homes!

Looking good Mr. Kotter!

I like Craftsman style also, but glad this is not mine it's 3 story and over 4000 Sf, I think 4200 and in Hope. Plus a separate 2 story carriage house behind it.

 

7 hours ago, grasshopper said:

You got yourself some fine flooring, Elden. Wish it was in my house.

 

.

I wish I had those floors also, can not afford those for sure. But 100 years ago that was a standard floor and other stuff went on top. These floors were carpeted from day one with carpet, the padding looked like horse hair or some type of straw and thick.  

 

.

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15 minutes ago, dtel said:

Probably more than one spec, it was swept, swiffered, vacuumed and we picked up pieces as we seen them, but yes I am sure we missed some.

 

Minwax Polyurethane satin. About 3.5-4 gallons for the first coat. It never dried In time for the second coat so Craig and Jim went back Sunday morning to put the second coat, and we left to come home. I would think it took a good bit less for the second coat. 

 

We used a watering can like you would water plants with to put down a little kid of in a line and spread it with a tool that is made for that, it's like a t bar and you slide a foam piece on it, it did all the floors without falling apart. It's like a tough foam connected to a PVC pipe that slides over the bar, it works perfect, just what we needed and easy it is 18" wide.  

Padco-Lightweight-Floor-Coater-19525-PR-LG.jpg

It wasn't water based was it?

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No it was oil based, we were quite surprised the smell was not worse than it was, I think the heater running was drawing the fumes to the back of the house. Still probably lost few brain cells which is OK even though were running low.

I was painting poly on the wood trim around the fireplace so he could work right up to it doing the floor. The watering can was 2.5 gallons, you can kind of see it.

museum (4).jpg

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6 minutes ago, dtel said:

I like Craftsman style also, but glad this is not mine it's 3 story and over 4000 Sf, I think 4200 and in Hope. Plus a separate 2 story carriage house behind it.

 

I wish I had those floors also, can not afford those for sure. But 100 years ago that was a standard floor and other stuff went on top. These floors were carpeted from day one with carpet, the padding looked like horse hair or some type of straw and thick.  

 

.


We just had new carpet installed on stairs, hallway and two spare bedrooms. Used horse hair padding (or today’s equivalent) to avoid foam paddings tendency to compress and flatten out in high traffic areas. Highly recommended by the carpet store and installers. 

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I had no idea that was even used back then or later, it was someone's guess as we were pulling it out. Good for you, normal padding does compress and even worse starts to fall apart and is a real mess, smart especially on stairs. 

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1 hour ago, dtel said:

No it was oil based, we were quite surprised the smell was not worse than it was, I think the heater running was drawing the fumes to the back of the house. Still probably lost few brain cells which is OK even though were running low.

I was painting poly on the wood trim around the fireplace so he could work right up to it doing the floor. The watering can was 2.5 gallons, you can kind of see it.

museum (4).jpg

Good thing it wasn't " moisture cure". I did my old house & the smell was there for 6 months.

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The smell was not that bad, but if you left and came back in from the back door where the air return was for the heater it was stronger.

 

It usually dries fast and says it's OK to apply down to 40 degrees, it was above 40 but it really slowed it down, took all night to get where you could walk on it. 

Before 6 hours no re sanding is needed but after 6 hours you are supposed to sand before a second coat. Were hoping since it took all night to get to that point it's going to be OK, probably will. 

 

It's going to be a nice place to display PWK's collection of things, and to have listening rooms for different periods of time through the different Klipsch designs.

 

The original Museum will still be in place by the plant, there are enough artifacts to fill both buildings, it will be nice.

 

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10 hours ago, richieb said:


We just had new carpet installed on stairs, hallway and two spare bedrooms. Used horse hair padding (or today’s equivalent) to avoid foam paddings tendency to compress and flatten out in high traffic areas. Highly recommended by the carpet store and installers. 

The best pad is the thinnest or no pad at all.  The carpet lasts so much longer and never needs to be stretched.

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