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colterphoto1

Washing Machines

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You know, that appliance you buy every couple of decades, technology and government mandates change everything. I'm a simple guy, if I could buy one just like my old Whirlpool I'd do it again. But these days you get electronic controls ( or dials that merely control a computer, just as bad if things go wrong), no porcelain cabinet etc.  I'm hearing that some of the newer ones don't rinse the soap out as well or that the low profile agitators don't do as good of job at cleaning. Yeah, I know I research stuff too much. But my history is that I'll shop something to death, and buy one that fails anyway. 

 

 

Any tips? Looking at a fairly inexpensive Whirlpool Cabrio for about 5 c-notes.  Thanks guys, I trust your opinions. 

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For starters, nothing will be made to last 20 years. Primarily because the electronics that are now added have a very low MTBF. So, even if you got steel gears - rare - you'll be stuck with the cheapest uP board money can buy. So, long term reliability is not likely. 

 

For cleaning, I like front loaders. They are very efficient and do a good job. We have a Bosch because our $2,000 high end Whirlpool Neptune set went south after just 7 years! Plastic gears in the tranny. 

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There's top loaders and front loaders.

 

Top loaders, cheaper to purchase and fix, less complexity, last longer, less efficient.  Just the opposite on front loaders, more expensive to buy and repair, more complex more apt to break.  They use less water and electricity when working properly compared to their top loading counterparts.

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I asked a repair tech working at my dad's house about front loaders. He said, "best thing that ever happened to my business because there is a lot of job security built right in." He went on to say they fail often and it's expensive when they do.

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The above are generalizations, research your particular model.

 

Of note, if you purchase a high efficiency washer, you'll need to purchase high efficiency soap to use in it.  There are some high efficiency top loaders as well which are complex like the front loaders.

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My Maytag repairman says they are all garbage including Maytag new models. My last repair wasn't really a repair as I put in a small load with large water fill. Mine are 17 years old and working fine and he says don't buy any new ones.

JJK

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Get a roommate, then take $100 a month off the rent if they assume laundry duty.  Worked for me.

But if you have to do laundry yourself...jam some Siberian Khatru at a deafening level.

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We have tweny year old front load maytag washer & dryer with knobs. I know what your saying about the new stuff. Over the years I have been able to fix my washer and dryer...not to many issues....but in the back of my mind I'm thinking about the day I can't fix it.

Soon it'll be your home appliances will have OBD ports and you'll have to hook up a scantool for diagnostics....

Good luck.....

MKP :-)

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I hate to say this but it's basically a crap shoot.  For most appliances you can't find many that will have solid reviews across the board.  Check consumer reports and try and find a model with a lot of positive reviews from people that have owned them for more that a few months.  Efficiency regulations are part of the reason that the reliability has been killed in most appliances because the manufacturer's had to comply.  Just look at the motors and compressors and most of the parts in a 20 year old machine.  I've purchased quite a few new appliances and with the exception of my Bosch dishwasher (ratings and reviews killed about everything else in the market) I ended up rolling the dice and hoping for the best, which sucks because in most cases, you can't even spend your way to reliability. 

 

Don't overlook used.

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Looking at a fairly inexpensive Whirlpool Cabrio for about 5 c-notes.

WTW8500DW is rated pretty well on CR but the prices I'm pulling for that are 800-1000 so if you've found one for $500, that sounds pretty solid. 

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Colter, get yourself a decent front loading HE washer. Whirlpool, Kenmore Elite, Samsung all make nice washers these days. Look for one with a SS tub too. Less chance for corrosion. As was stated above, the front loaders are easier to fix, and cheaper as well. Most of the new washers rely on the computer modules and circuit boards, hard to fix yourself, but a quick fix for a service man and very little can go wrong.

 

 

 

Also, word for anyone looking at continued repair issues, home warranties make a lot of sense. For $35 a month our American Home Shield warranty covers us for all repairs on our washer, dryer, dishwasher, fridge, freezers, stove, disposal, A/C, furnace, fireplace, sump pump, water tank....you name it. Flat rate $75 service charge and they come out same day. If they can't fix it, they replace it. We bought a side by side about ten years ago in stainless from a neighbor that was moving out. Last year it died on us, they found out that the new parts alone to fix that fridge would run about $900 for compressor, motor, fan and all that. Instead they cut us a check for $2300 to go pick a new one out. We only paid $700 for the fridge ten yrs ago. Pretty good deal that can really pay off. Just my two cents.

Edited by teaman

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I have had the same set for 25 years.  Kenmore.  I dread the day that they give out. 

 

I have two Mongram refrigerators.  One is a little older and runs.  The other is computerized and the board failed.  Same board that is used in all of their low end models.   I was able to fix it myself, but so much for a high end refrigerator being more reliable.  Looks pretty, that is about it. 

 

Everything is disposable now.  The generation coming up will know no other way than to continually replace everything. 

Edited by tigerwoodKhorns
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My advice is:  don't go cheap, or, too cheap.....I have had great luck with Samsung and Kenmore front loaders.  If you don't need all of the fancy features, buy the model with the least of them.  You will save water, clothes will be cleaner, and will rinse better.

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I had Maytag Neptune front loaders that are 15-17 years old and they still work. The washer got out of whack and the clothes always smelled a little "mildewey" and I replaced them with Samsung front loaders.   I guess they both do about the same job, but they just dont clean as well as the old top loaders.   If I was doing it all again, I would look at some old school Setups from Speed Queen.

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Go with a front loader.  They are quiet and use a fraction of the water of a top loader and use a fraction of the soap.  My monthly water bill went down by a third when we switched, but when the 3x kids were living here we did laundry 5x per week.  The savings in the front loader paid for itself in a couple of years.

 

The downside to the front loader is they need cleaned once a month or they will start to stink.  All that means is you clean a drain plug at the bottom and use a general spray cleaner to clean the front glass on the inside.

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clothes always smelled a little "mildewey" a
 

We experienced the mildew idea for the first month we had the front loader. We had been leaving the door closed when not in use. But the door on a front loader SEALS tight when closed, giving mildew a chance to start. We quickly determined to prop the door open by 6" when not in use. Never had mildew again.

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clothes always smelled a little "mildewey" a
 

We experienced the mildew idea for the first month we had the front loader. We had been leaving the door closed when not in use. But the door on a front loader SEALS tight when closed, giving mildew a chance to start. We quickly determined to prop the door open by 6" when not in use. Never had mildew again.

 

 

 

We always kept our door open and continue to with the new rig.   After seeing pictures like this, we just decided it was time for fear of what could be there that we couldn't see.

 Photos like this freaked my wife out.  I know there is a lot of dangers with some molds out there, but I have never worried much about it.  Even today, some of the fabric softeners smell like mildew to me.  Anymore, I cant handle anything scented.  I like straight up Arm and hammer washing detergent.

 

 

IMG_0029.jpg

 

 

11840394-large.jpg

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WOW

 

Our is stainless steel inside. Every week or so we are doing a load that involves bleach. I look inside all the time because it was an expensive unit. I'm not seeing any trouble yet. 

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It really is a crap shoot & I wish you well with your eventual decision.

I'm holding out as long as I can.

 

I was fighting a wet floor after every load with our 18 yr old Maytag, 2 belt, top loader.

After a call to our (luckily local) appliance parts store, it was apparent it needed a stem seal & bearing replacement.

$120 & 3 hours of my time later, it is again the reliable Maytag I once bought.

 

Those 2 belt, top loaders, are what the commercial laundromats used for many years due to their reliability and easy repairs when needed.

Scum behind the door seal, and funk associated with the front loaders, along with the extra curricular circuitry on them just begs for trouble long term.

 

Fingers crossed here for another 18 years of trouble free washing.

Edited by Arrow#422

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WOW

 

Our is stainless steel inside. Every week or so we are doing a load that involves bleach. I look inside all the time because it was an expensive unit. I'm not seeing any trouble yet. 

 

 

No. Your wash drum stays clean inside. Those pics are the view of the drainage void that can't be seen without removing the drum. Problem is the are many voids behind it that never are in contact with the drainage water which will kill bacteria, yet they stay wet and damp which leads to the mold growing where it will never be cleaned.  I think the first few front load models from manu's were the ones that had this problem and ours was one of the first released which left us wondering if we had the same problem.  We tried tons of bleach and everything, just still had that two or three day old wet towel smell.   

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