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Will a separate ss amp bring up the volume for the bass driver front speakers?


StratCountry
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Check the cabinet for air leaks by pushing the woofer back as evenly as you can and checking if the passive stays in the same position, if the passive moves back in you have a leak.

 

To find the leak ( if there is one) run a 20 Hz tone through the system, enough to get the woofer moving 1/8" or so and using a 3/16- 1/4" vacuum line or similar type hose with one end near your ear and the other end go around all the drivers, passive, terminal cup and seams. If there is a leak you will hear a chuffing sound from the end of the hose.

 

 

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52 minutes ago, veloceleste said:

although it seems counterintuitive to have a rear passive radiator firing into a bass trap

 

noticed this with a pair of rear ported speakers.  Glad that I'm not going crazy/er. Won't go into the discovery process.

 Relating to a member with a new pair of CWIII falling flat at 60hz. Had everything to do with the room dimensions.

 

might try running a sweep at MLP.

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1 hour ago, StratCountry said:

My current SVS SB-2000 helped some the last 2 years but where My listening area is, there is a strong dead bass area there, everywhere else including the kitchen, the bass is good, this is with the subwoofer bass, the front speakers bass was pretty low throughout the room, I did try the Subwoofers placement but generally in the same end of the room.

 

  • Try moving the sub around some more, including in a rear corner, behind the couch, etc.  Either you or it are probably sitting in a room null. 
  • Can you turn the sub up? 

 

As Augspurger of JBL used to say, most people, as long as they are assured that their speakers are flat, like a little bump in the bass.  This is more true now than it used to be -- see Chris A's many posts, starting with "The Missing Octave."

 

If you use Audyssey (I love it), you, like everyone else who uses it will have to turn the subwoofer up AFTER running the calibration (or else Audyssey will turn it right down, having "heard" too much bass).

Most people prefer it with an after calibration bass boost of 3 to 9 dB.

 

In some rooms, some phase cancellation occurs if you have your main fronts on full range.  In those rooms you actually get more bass with the main speakers set to SMALL rather than LARGE.  I  think the reason someone asked that question is that you absolutely need full range, LARGE, if  you DON'T use a subwoofer.

 

See this also, by Mike Thomas; it's a goldmine, and covers more than just dealing with subs.

GUIDE TO SUBWOOFER CALIBRATION AND BASS PREFERENCES
* The Guide linked above is a comprehensive guide to Audio & HT systems, including:
Speaker placements & Room treatments; HT calibration & Room EQ; Room gain; Bass
Preferences; Subwoofer Buyer's Guide: Sealed/ported; ID subs; Subwoofer placement.

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51 minutes ago, StratCountry said:

Not sure I want to go that route. It's very loud at a 3rd up or slightly more on my volume, referring to the mid & highs.

it is not about the level it is about the amps ability to control the speaker. A sub would also be a way to solve the balance issue to make it to be what ever you want it to be.

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10 hours ago, garyrc said:

 

  • Try moving the sub around some more, including in a rear corner, behind the couch, etc.  Either you or it are probably sitting in a room null. 
  • Can you turn the sub up? 

 

As Augspurger of JBL used to say, most people, as long as they are assured that their speakers are flat, like a little bump in the bass.  This is more true now than it used to be -- see Chris A's many posts, starting with "The Missing Octave."

 

If you use Audyssey (I love it), you, like everyone else who uses it will have to turn the subwoofer up AFTER running the calibration (or else Audyssey will turn it right down, having "heard" too much bass).

Most people prefer it with an after calibration bass boost of 3 to 9 dB.

 

In some rooms, some phase cancellation occurs if you have your main fronts on full range.  In those rooms you actually get more bass with the main speakers set to SMALL rather than LARGE.  I  think the reason someone asked that question is that you absolutely need full range, LARGE, if  you DON'T use a subwoofer.

 

See this also, by Mike Thomas; it's a goldmine, and covers more than just dealing with subs.

GUIDE TO SUBWOOFER CALIBRATION AND BASS PREFERENCES
* The Guide linked above is a comprehensive guide to Audio & HT systems, including:
Speaker placements & Room treatments; HT calibration & Room EQ; Room gain; Bass
Preferences; Subwoofer Buyer's Guide: Sealed/ported; ID subs; Subwoofer placement.

 

I'll set the fronts to small for awhile,  that could be the problem with low frequencies. 

I always had to turn up the bass after using Audyssey.

There is a frequency adjustment & volume which I played around with as well as the phase shift adjustment. 

Polarities are correct.

I'll try subwoofer placement some more.

Will check for air leaks and read the article link.

I wonder if a second woofer might help in this case?

 

Appreciate all your help here.

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As noticed, music with weak bass is less than satisfying.  If your SVS sub is not bringing the bass to the listening position either, I doubt an amplifier addition will do it for the Chorus.  If you are indeed in a bass null,  there are a few things you can do.  one being, move the sub nearfield, close to the listening position.  That should bring the most dramatic change.  Another is the subwoofer test, where you put the sub on the seat where you sit and play some bass heavy music,  walk around the room and listen for the place where you hear the most bass. Then you put the sub in that spot.  As well, you owe it to yourself to bring back the bass. 😀  if things don't work as you have it set up, change the room layout, get out of the null and find an arrangement that works. 👍     

 

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11 hours ago, jason str said:

Check the cabinet for air leaks by pushing the woofer back as evenly as you can and checking if the passive stays in the same position, if the passive moves back in you have a leak.

Think this is reversed :)  No air leak should mean if I push on the woofer, the passive will move ...

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1 hour ago, Emile said:

Think this is reversed :)  No air leak should mean if I push on the woofer, the passive will move ...

 

The passive will move either way unless there is a gaping hole, the passive will move back to its normal position slowly if there is a leak.

 

Sometimes i forget some have no experience but it seemed pretty self explanatory.

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I see two paths forward here. You can keep guessing or you can measure your system response and know exactly what’s going on. If you’re running Audyssy then it will try to autocorrect to flat response in your room. It’s quite likely that you just don’t like the sound of flat response and need to make some manual eq adjustments to get the sound you have in mind. There’s an app you can get for your Marantz that will let you manually change the EQ curve for your main channels. But step 1 is to get a measurement microphone and take a response sweep measurement from your listening position so you know where you are starting from. There are many of us here that can help you with the technical aspects of this.

 

I run my system with three different response curves: flat, some midbass enhancement and significant midbass enhancement. Each one of these curves sounds best depending on the quality of the recording. My guess is you will like the sound of a low shelf boost of between 2 - 6d centered at 200hz. This will emphasize the low string of a bass guitar and the thump of the drum bottom end without muddying the vocal range. 

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I think this is a very good idea.  The previous owner may not have hooked up the new crossovers correctly.
Yeah, it happens all the time. Check the polarity on the drivers themselves as well. Previous owners.....I've had two sets of speakers that had the mid drivers hooked up backwards.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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20 hours ago, StratCountry said:

My Chorus ii speakers are connected to my Marantz SR-7011 receiver. The bass level on these speakers have always been too low for me

 

If there was a way to bi-amp my Chorus ii’s, I would go that route since my SR-7011 has quite a few flexible options including adjusting the crossovers within the receiver.

 

99687568_20190912_1503122.thumb.jpg.d27f0b2180b57221012f6d6355f210dd.jpg

 

Others have alluded to speaker placement and I agree.  I see couches directly blocking the woofer on both sides.  Try moving the speakers away from the wall and closer to the TV, use a little less toe-in and see if that helps the sound.  I think it will.

+++

 

You have a great AVR in the 7011, it has an incredible amount of options.  I have the 6011 running 5.1 in Neural-X most of the time for TV/movies.

 

I think part of your weak bass issues might be in the set up of your 7011.  I assume you are using Audyssey.  Try the different curves (flat, L/R Bypass, etc) to find what your preference is.  You should really be able to tune that bass to exactly what you like.  You can also use Audyssey Manual to boost the L/R bass exactly where you want it.  I would suggest you not bump any more than 3 db.

 

I suggest you use Dynamic EQ, but I'm guessing you already are.  Try experimenting with Dynamic Volume, which turns on Dynamic EQ by default.  A lot of people will tell you not to use Dynamic Volume but try it for yourself, see what you think.  I think you'll find it greatly fills in the bass at lower to mid volume in a full way. 

 

Eco Mode ON will restrict your power to about 40 watts.  Try Auto or Off.  You don't waste any more electricity and your 7011 is fully capable of giving those speakers all they need.

+++

 

You can bi-amp just for fun if nothing else works.  I've used it with my RF-83's.  Bi-amp mode does not make the bass any stronger, the effects are very subtle at best, maybe a 1-2% increase in mid-range clarity.  That's all I could hear, if that.

 

591494550_RP-600Mbi-amprightsideview_800.thumb.jpg.b8712124600503367435c1ae83b68773.jpg

 

 

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59 minutes ago, MenloBob said:

I see two paths forward here. You can keep guessing or you can measure your system response and know exactly what’s going on. If you’re running Audyssy then it will try to autocorrect to flat response in your room. It’s quite likely that you just don’t like the sound of flat response and need to make some manual eq adjustments to get the sound you have in mind. There’s an app you can get for your Marantz that will let you manually change the EQ curve for your main channels. But step 1 is to get a measurement microphone and take a response sweep measurement from your listening position so you know where you are starting from. There are many of us here that can help you with the technical aspects of this.

 

I run my system with three different response curves: flat, some midbass enhancement and significant midbass enhancement. Each one of these curves sounds best depending on the quality of the recording. My guess is you will like the sound of a low shelf boost of between 2 - 6d centered at 200hz. This will emphasize the low string of a bass guitar and the thump of the drum bottom end without muddying the vocal range. 

 

You are correct, I do NOT like flat frequency response. My eq settings have always been the smiling face look with mids slightly less than 0db, my son got stuck in that position too.

"There’s an app you can get for your Marantz that will let you manually change the EQ curve for your main channels." How do I find this app? Thanks.

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41 minutes ago, wvu80 said:

 

Others have alluded to speaker placement and I agree.  I see couches directly blocking the woofer on both sides.  Try moving the speakers away from the wall and closer to the TV, use a little less toe-in and see if that helps the sound.  I think it will.

+++

 

You have a great AVR in the 7011, it has an incredible amount of options.  I have the 6011 running 5.1 in Neural-X most of the time for TV/movies.

 

I think part of your weak bass issues might be in the set up of your 7011.  I assume you are using Audyssey.  Try the different curves (flat, L/R Bypass, etc) to find what your preference is.  You should really be able to tune that bass to exactly what you like.  You can also use Audyssey Manual to boost the L/R bass exactly where you want it.  I would suggest you not bump any more than 3 db.

 

I suggest you use Dynamic EQ, but I'm guessing you already are.  Try experimenting with Dynamic Volume, which turns on Dynamic EQ by default.  A lot of people will tell you not to use Dynamic Volume but try it for yourself, see what you think.  I think you'll find it greatly fills in the bass at lower to mid volume in a full way. 

 

Eco Mode ON will restrict your power to about 40 watts.  Try Auto or Off.  You don't waste any more electricity and your 7011 is fully capable of giving those speakers all they need.

+++

 

You can bi-amp just for fun if nothing else works.  I've used it with my RF-83's.  Bi-amp mode does not make the bass any stronger, the effects are very subtle at best, maybe a 1-2% increase in mid-range clarity.  That's all I could hear, if that.

 

591494550_RP-600Mbi-amprightsideview_800.thumb.jpg.b8712124600503367435c1ae83b68773.jpg

 

 

 

I always keep my Eco-Mode off, there is a huge difference in sound quality (in a bad way" when on.

When I stand in my listening area, the bass is good, but in my sitting position same area, I lose what seems to be 50% of my bass frequencies, I can move either left or right 2-3 feet, the bass gradually increases, really strange. As I mentioned in one of my earlier posts, every where else in the room including the kitchen, the entire frequency range sounds great.

There are crossovers adjustments in my receiver, but I never wanted to mess with them since my 7.1 sounds great as is except for the bass null while sitting in my easy chair.

I have tried every sound options in my receiver since I bought it about 2 years ago from Crutchfield but will continue doing so, there must be something I'm missing while adjusting sound options in my receiver.

I  know if I purchased a 2nd subwoofer and place them in their correct places, it will solve this null bass area, I'd rather do away with the assistance of the sub since I know the fronts can really pound except at very high volume setting. I'll move the fronts around some more but keeping them in the same end wall.

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45 minutes ago, StratCountry said:

When I stand in my listening area, the bass is good, but in my sitting position same area, I lose what seems to be 50% of my bass frequencies, I can move either left or right 2-3 feet, the bass gradually increases, really strange

 

You have standing waves that are cancelling the bass. You need to change something about the relationship between the speakers and the shape of the room.

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