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Advice for Beginners - consider this test from an audio club

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I do now. Sorry about that. 

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@kink56 ,   I played some full spectrum pink noise through a La Scala while observing a Real Time Analyzer and I see the hump in the frequency response that you are talking about. I guess that gives this speaker the "punch" that many people seem to enjoy. Thanks for giving me something interesting to think about. 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Khornukopia said:

@kink56 ,   I played some full spectrum pink noise through a La Scala while observing a Real Time Analyzer and I see the hump in the frequency response that you are talking about. I guess that gives this speaker the "punch" that many people seem to enjoy. Thanks for giving me something interesting to think about. 

 

 

As I’m sure you know but it should still be pointed out that in the region around 300hz and below in most typical sized Listening rooms we are very much hearing the combination of (loudspeaker + boundary constructive and destructive interference + room modal response). So if I had Lascala or Belle I would suggest trying to locate the mouth of the mouth around a quarter of a wavelength at 150 hz from the front and/or side walls and another option to minimize any cumulative effects around the 150hz region from room modes (if your rooms dimensions support the creation of modes in this region) is to locate the loudspeaker at the null points for the 150 hz region axial modes and in some situations if the floor to ceiling mode is an issue in the 150 hz region (which is highly possible if your ceiling height is around 7.5ft to 8ft) then placing the loudspeaker on a riser as I’ve seen some have done with the Lascala could be a good solution.

 

miketn

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My Klipschorns measure fairly good, and sound bigger and better than another pair of speakers that measure flatter, in the same room.

 

IMG_1154.JPG.10600d6d63b6f1d3e96523be5ba7e27a.JPG

 

 

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The huge difference is when you turn up the volume. Most of the other speakers can't produce the clean, powerful SPL. 

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21 minutes ago, Khornukopia said:

My Klipschorns measure fairly good, and sound bigger and better than another pair of speakers that measure flatter, in the same room.

 

IMG_1154.JPG.10600d6d63b6f1d3e96523be5ba7e27a.JPG

 

 

I assume that is an android smart phone so what ap are you using?

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3 hours ago, Dave A said:

what ap are you using?

 

The display in the picture is the measurement from a wired microphone connected to a dbx PA2. I also use the free download, REW (Room EQ Wizard) on a laptop. There are some inexpensive or free RTA apps available for Android and I-phone devices that are very handy tools. I like to capture freeze frames of my handheld RTA and SPL meter when listening to live music, so I can make realistic comparisons at home.

 

On your smart phone or I-Pod, just search the app store for RTA and/or SPL meter.

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My 1976 La Scala's produced their own fart sound when I first got them (only slight exaggeration).  Starting at around 85db and up they really produced some lousy noise.  They had spent their life in a choir loft organ installation so I imagine they were exposed to a lot of heat through the years.  A large injection of glue at all the joints and bracing the bins took care of the vibration.  This didn't do anything for the 148hz peak.  I had never heard about this peak being a characteristic of La Scala's but was playing with DSP settings by ear to get pretty close to finding this out on my own.  I just assumed it was my room causing the issue.  Using pink noise I found that I had gotten pretty close already but was able to dial it in great.  The iPhone makes for a surprisingly good spl meter. 

 

You don't have to go to an active crossover.  If you are using a DAC it can be pretty simple to dial in these settings into DSP that is available with some players.  I originally used Foobar which can get pretty close to the settings you want.  Roon (I know... it's expensive) allows you to dial this in perfectly.  What a nice difference there is dropping 148hz 7db (q=8)!    We can do this even with our passive crossovers.  However, I haven't figured out how I'm going to address this for vinyl.  I might go as far as to digitize my vinyl so I can play it back via DAC with DSP enabled.  

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On 1/15/2019 at 1:39 PM, jimjimbo said:
On 1/15/2019 at 1:05 PM, Deang said:

Klipsch hit a home run with the LaScala II. Excellent sounding loudspeaker.

Completely agree.  After I heard them and the Heresy III at Hope last year, it was an easy decision for me.

 

Bose?

 

:emotion-14:

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22 minutes ago, Coytee said:

 

Bose?

 

:emotion-14:

How'd you guess?

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Does anyone have an appropriate passive notch filter already worked out for La Scala’s 148 Hertz hump?  Easy enough to put it in on a switch to see if it improves the sound.

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11 hours ago, mikebse2a3 said:

As I’m sure you know but it should still be pointed out that in the region around 300hz and below in most typical sized Listening rooms we are very much hearing the combination of (loudspeaker + boundary constructive and destructive interference + room modal response). So if I had Lascala or Belle I would suggest trying to locate the mouth of the mouth around a quarter of a wavelength at 150 hz from the front and/or side walls and another option to minimize any cumulative effects around the 150hz region from room modes (if your rooms dimensions support the creation of modes in this region) is to locate the loudspeaker at the null points for the 150 hz region axial modes and in some situations if the floor to ceiling mode is an issue in the 150 hz region (which is highly possible if your ceiling height is around 7.5ft to 8ft) then placing the loudspeaker on a riser as I’ve seen some have done with the Lascala could be a good solution.

 

miketn

Nah, just PEQ the sucker.

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5 hours ago, Coytee said:

 

Bose?

 

:emotion-14:

Yes, the Klipsch has a hard time keeping up.

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13 minutes ago, Tizman said:

Does anyone have an appropriate passive notch filter already worked out for La Scala’s 148 Hertz hump?  Easy enough to put it in on a switch to see if it improves the sound.

 

When you are that low in frequency, then room effects will swamp any perturbations in the frequency response of the cabinet. I am not sure I would worry about it.

If you want to pursue it, I would borrow a DSP box. You can pick up a Behringer DEQ 2496 for less than 300 and explore the effect. If it has a positive effect, then buy a better DSP box and add it to your system. 

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Getting rid of that 150 Hz hump makes a big difference in a positive way, every little improvement makes for a more enjoyable listening session.

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I can try it with EQ, just to see if it makes any difference in my setup, but my preference would be to do it passively, and do it with some of the quality parts I have at hand. My last Behringer crossover made its presence know in a negative way.  It’s was noisy and you could hear it in the chain, so I’m leery  about buying another Behringer component.

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=== I refuse to skim the past 78 pages of back and forth but I recall the premise was that all amplifiers sound alike? I’m curious why no one brought up what can actually influence the sound of an amplifier -  the preamp. Is the OP going to say that like all amps, all preamps sound alike too? I bring this up as I shuffled pre’s today and the difference is by no means subtle — 

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6 minutes ago, richieb said:

 

=== I refuse to skim the past 78 pages of back and forth but I recall the premise was that all amplifiers sound alike? I’m curious why no one brought up what can actually influence the sound of an - the preamp. Is the OP going to say that like all amps, all preamps sound alike too? I bring this up as I shuffled pre’s today and the difference is by no means subtle — 

The premise wasn’t worthy of a response 

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